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July 19, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-07-19

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Page 10-Thursday, July 19, 1979--The Michigan Daily
'U' prof speculates on Carter staff's moves

connuedfrom Page 1)
and set up his team" for the next elec-
tion.
"The cabinet may well have
strengthened their position in the ad-
ministration," Grassmuck speculated.
"Cabinet members are making Carter
decide now," who will be on with him
during his campaign and afterwards.
ONCE THOSE replacements are
made it will be difficult for Carter to
change things around," Grassmuck
said. A revamped team is "supposed to
give . . . a clean bill of health" to the
Carter administration, he continued.
Despite the impending
reorganization, Grassmuck said Carter
still has a strong chance to be reelected,
largely because of the proven advan-
tages of being an incumbent president.
"I don't think this has helped his
Nederlander
appointed
(Continued from Page 3)
a Detroit law firm, and also has been
active in state party politics. Hertzberg
is not scheduled to be at the Washington
meeting today.
NEDERLANDER WAS elected to the
University Board of Regents in 1968.
He received his B.A. from the
University, and got his law degree in
1958.
Nederlander has been active in
several gubernatorial campaigns, and
has held other posts in the state
Democratic party.

chances at all," Grassmuck said. "It
doesn't create a great deal of confiden-
ce in the American government."
The president's action "unites his
political campaign with domestic
policies," Grassmuck said. But he ad-
ded that it is not yet clear if the action's
effect will be favorable or unfavorable
to his re-election chances.
"LEFT ALONE as a single event, it
won't increase confidence in him,"
Grassmuck continued. But it will be
seen as "part of the whole picture"
which includes Carter's 12 days of
Camp David consultations, his recently
announced energy program, the SALT
II treaty, and the Mideast peace treaty.
Grassmuck also noted that the staff's
move followed Carter's long-awaited
speech on his energy program which
was very favorably received. The
speech, in which Carter asked for the
help of the American people, led to an
upsurge in his sagging popularity, ac-
cording to the polls.
The reorganization "will give the
president a chance to ... reshuffle his
task forces and energy team,"
Grassmuck said. Any appointments he
makes will be staunch supporters of his
energy program.
While the mass resignation had not
been expected, Carter had planned to
make some staff changes because of his
dissatisfaction with his aides,
Grassmuck noted. He said the
resignations of Attorney General Grif-
fin Bell and Energy Secretary James
Schlesinger had been anticipated.
Carter probably planned the
reorganization with assistant Hamilton

Jordan, who has now been named chief
of staff, Grassmuck said.
THE PROFESSOR said this action
set a precedent for a presidential
requies for full-scale resignations in
mid-term, as far as he knew. He cited
Nixon's request for the resignation of
all his appointees at the start of his
second term as the only similar instan-
ce.
Grassmuck said most past presidents
have had considerable turnover in their
administrations while in office, but to
date there has not been any major
upheavals in Carter's staff. He called
this precedent "tremendous" in view of
the size of the cabinet.
Since the public will be watching Car-
ter closely, Grassmuck said the
reorganization could have important
repercussions in Congress. "It will give
congressmen a chance to choose
sides." If Carter replaces certain
Cabinet officers,' their "champions (in
Congress) will come to bat for them."
"THEY WILL begin to look at the
White House in terms of their own
chance," Grassmuck said, like Carter,
"they are looking for re-election."
"This is the time for quick action on
the part of special interest groups,"
Grassmuck said. They are probably
"buzzing around" considering who to
suggest as replacement candidates, he
said.

Another University faculty member
said he will wait "to see which
resignations get picked up," before
assessing the effects of the White House
staff's resignation.
SO FAR it is "just a formal action,"
said Professor of Law Thomas Kauper,
who was the assistant attorney general
in charge of anti-trust action in the
Justice Department during the Nixon
and Ford administrations.
He is well acquainted with the
historical perspective of the current
situation.
"My resignation was requested," he
said, when Nixon asked for the
resignation of all presidential appoin-
tees at the start of his second term in
1972. Kauper's resignation was not ac-
cepted and he continued at his post.
Kauper said the Carter staff's action
"obviously doesn't help morale any."
In 1972, Americans responded to the
across-the-board request for
resignations, most of which were not
accepted in Nixon's attempt at a fresh
start, with a "reaction of considerable
uncertainty," Kauper added.
The effects "depend on how far down
(in the staff ranks) this goes," he said.
"If he starts accepting resignations in
his Energy Department it could have
considerable effect."

Wordproeessor employees
demand union reeognition

All rt W 4111 /IttLKtff !
IF YOU LIKED "BLOOPER$" YOU'LL LOVE...
10
TM
PAT TWO
SEE...JOHN BOY SMOKE A JOINT!
SEE ... CAROL BURNETT PICK HER NOSE!
SEE...THE FRANKENSTEIN MONSTER BREAK UP WITH LAUGHTER!
! "STAR TREK ABBOTT & COSTELLO
" BETTE DAVIS * HOLLYWOOD PALACE
* MASH . HUMPHREY BOGART
" BOB HOPE " ELVIS PRESLEY
* DRACULA " NAME THAT TUNE
* ERROL FLYNN " EDW. G. ROBINSON
* PERRY COMO * NEWLYWED GAME
" LAUGH -IN " JONATHAN WINTERS
* BOB NEWHART . SPENCER TRACY
* THE WALTONS " CAROL BURNETT
* RED SKELTON " CHARLIE CHAN
" FRANKENSTEIN * LON CHANEY JR.
" BING CROSBY * JOHNNY CARSON
* DON RICKLES * MIKE DOUGLAS
* SOUPY SALES " DICK VAN DYKE
" JERRY LEWIS " JAMES CAGNEY
" DON ADAMS * VINCENT PRICE, ETC.
BLOOPERS FROM THE SPORTS WORLD!
pu SILLY SHORT SUBJECTS! INCLUDING "SING ALONG WITH POPEYE"
T.V. COMMERICALS YOU WON'T BELIEVE! and "THE THREE STOOGES
BLOOPERSISATRADEMARKOF BLOOPERS NC c1979 LOPERS,INC
UNDEVTLGNOT AUMITE DWITHOUT PARENT A* R H EDIAN R
FOX VILLAGE TNHEATRE 3ANN UARBER

(Continued from Page 3)
employees would consider asking the
NLRB to conduct their election.
Low wages are a leading grievance of
Wordprocessor employees. Starting
pay is minimum wage - $2.90 an hour.
Employee Mary McNamara said raises
"aren't geared at all to the cost of
living."
MCNAMARA also said employees,
most of whom are full time, receive no
benefits, such as insurance, sick days
or paid vacations. "We are not asking
for anything outlandish," she added.
She said management is "really in-
consistent" in policy and has "no
regard for what they tell employees."
Other employees said working con-
ditions are especially poor. They said
they must work in a shop which has no
air conditioning, making their work en-
vironment "incredibly hot." The

machines in the shop also drive up tem-
peratures, sometimes as high as 100'
F., according to a leaflet employees
have been passing out.
SMITH DENIED many of the
workers' complaints. "It has never
been 100 degrees in here and we do have
air conditioning," she said.
Also, employees said they are often
forced to work overtime, and are never
guaranteed a fixed schedule.
Overtime is only given to employees
who wanted it, she said. "If anything,
my policy has been no overtime without
specific approval of a manager," she
said.
The IWW, the union which organized
workers for University Cellar, was
chosen about a month ago to represent
dissatisfied Wordprocessor workers,
according to McNamara.

Uniersity of the Philippinles
Concert chorus
THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
7:30 P.M.-Thursday, July 19
State Street at William, Ann Arbor
PROGRAM INCLUDES:
SACRED MUSIC, FILIPINO FOLK MUSIC,
CHOREOGRAPHED PHILIPPINE SONGS
TICKET INFORMATION: Phone 662-5529 or 971-5723
CONTRIBUTION: $3.00 (students #1.00)
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CONCERT
Proceeds for student scholarships

I

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