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July 13, 1979 - Image 14

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-07-13

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Page 14-Friday, July 13, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Carter official: Food not political weapon

EAST LANSING (UPI)-A Carter
administration spokesman said yester-
day it is virtually impossible for the
world's grain exporting nations to use
food as a political weapon that would
force the oil exporters to lower their
prices.
Dale Hathaway, an assistant
agriculture secretary, said that though
the oil consuming nations are willing to
pay almost any amount for oil, "no one
is willing to pay $20 for a bushel of

"'IF ONE TAKES out Nigeria and
Indonesia from the cartel, the rest of
the OPEC countries could buy their
food elsewhere," Hathaway said.
"There are very few customers in rich
countries for $20 wheat and no
customers in poor countries because
they cannot afford it.
"The idea may make a good song, but
it's a bad political policy," Hathaway
said.
THE FORMER Michigan State

University (MSU) professor returned
to East Lansing for the last day of the
Nineth International Agricultural
Engineering Congress which began
July 8.
Hathaway was one of three speakers
addressing the closing session.
Carl Hall, dean of the Collge of
Engineering at Washington State
University (WSU), told the meeting
plants will paly a more significant role
in energy production in the future.

Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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THE THIRD speaker, Sylvan Wit-
twer, director of the MSU agriculture
experiment station, talked about ways
of increasing crop yield to ease possible
future food shortages.
Hathaway told the gathering that for
the world's population to have enough
to eat by the turn of the century, there
have to be marked improvements in
farming technology, worldwide food
distribution and resources
management.
Another significant factor is gover-
nment regulation.
"MANY DEVELOPING countries
have cheap food policies which
discourage farmers," Hathaway said.
"They overvalue their currency which
amounts to a subsidy for imports and a
tax on exports. There's no incentive for
farmers to produce more."
This space contributed b
the puhlsher as a r his service
"Maybe
it wl
away.
The five most
dangerous
words in the
English
language.
American
Cancer
Society
We want
to cure cancer
in your lifetime.

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