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July 10, 1979 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1979-07-10

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Page 2-Tuesday, July 10, 1979-The Michigan Daily
July is hottest month for stolen bikes
(Continued from Page1)
very high if we have the proper iden- He also suggested a bicycle owner et- will leave that bike downtown and steal serial numbers and1
tification," said Ann Arbor Police ch his or her driver's license number on another one for the ride back to State police. We'll take
Major Robert Whittaker. Proper iden- the frame. Etching tools are available St., Whittaker said. without a serial nun
tification includes a complete descrip- for free at the fire station. He added that bike owners should serial number (the
tion, a serial number, and a bicycle MOST BIKE thieves use bolt cutters lock their vehicles inside a building piece of paper," W
license number, according to Whit- to break chain locks, Whittaker added. with a cable-type chain and a key lock. Permanent bicyc
taker Liquid nitrogen, which eats through the Combinations locks aren't effective available for 50 cent
Part of the reason for the Ann Arbor chains, seems to be a common tool of because, said Whittaker, "there are office in City Hall.
Police Department's high location rate teen-age bike thieves, supposedly just so many combinations, and if the Once you've made
is the National Crime Information Cen- because it is available in high school kids are good, just give them enough next few weeks yo
ter (NCIC) in Washington. Once a bike chemistry laboratories, time" The chain should be placed garage at the police
has been recovered, identification The average bike stealer in Ann Ar- thro." the spoes h e around gai te at
numbers are processed through NCIC bor, according to Whittaker, swipes an frameg Even bike manufa
to locate the two-wheeler's owner. Just unlocked bicycle from State St. because IF YOUR BIKE is stolen, Whittaker tie to add devices t
last Sunday, the owner of a bike found he or she needs a convenient way to get said, you should "look immediately in bike thefts. "Anythi
in Saline was traced through NCIC, downtown. Chances are the thief, who is the area," in case the thief simply dum- in," said Wittaker,
Whittaker said. probably high school or college age, ei r "Then find the tiene and kid can take cad awit

2

report it to the local
a report with or
rber. But without a
report), is just a
hittaker explained.
le licenses are
s in the City Clerk's
the report, for the
u can peruse the
e station where un-
tored.
acturers can do lit-
hat would prevent
ng a man can put
"an eight-year-old
h the proper tools."

}/UI l . 1I 11 10H M5 11

n '-l at u, WII

Carter announces increase in Saudi Oil production

(Continued from Page 1)
O'Neill said the members of Congress
were told the increase in Saudi oil
production would be from 500,000 to 1
million barrels a day. But it was un-
clear how much of the increase would
reach gasoline pumps in the United
States or when it would be available.
EVEN SO, the report was the first
good news for the- administration to
emerge from the domestic summit con-
ference.
Rep. Toby Moffett (D-Conn.), who
has been sharply critical of Carter's
energy proposals, said after the mor-
ning meeting: "It was obvious we were
Chairman appointed
James Neel, M.D., chairman of the
department of human genetics at the
University, will serve as president of
the VIth International Congress of
Human Genetics.
In notifying Neel of his selection, the
organizing committee of the Congress
said, "In view of your many original
and important contributions to human
genetics and your preeminent position
in the field, your nomination to serve in
this most central position was a natural
choice."
The Congress will be held Sept. 13-18,
1981, in Jerusalem.
TEACHERS WANTED
All K-8 grades. Low income Catholic
schools in Texas. Small monthly stip-
end, furnished housing and basic
needs provided. Begin Aug. 12. Write
Volanteers for Edacationa land Social
Services, Box N, 3001 South Congress,
Austin Texas 78704.

talking to a person in deep political
trouble - who knows he's in deep
political trouble and who's trying to do
something about it."
Rumors of the Saudi oil production
hike had been circulating in the Middle
East since last week after the Saudi
state radio announced a temporary in-
crease because the government needed
the extra money for its $142 billion
development program.
IN NICOSIA, Cyprus, the Middle
East Economic Survey reported
yesterday just hours before the White
House announcement that the increase
Brown's book awarded
University Prof. Deming Brown's
most recent book, "Soviet Russian
Literature Since Stalin," has been elec-
ted by Choice Magazine as one of the
outstanding academic books of 1978.
Brown is director of the University
Center for Russian and East European
Studies.
About five per cent of books reviewed
during the year are selected by the
magazine. The listing will appear in the
May issue of Choice Magazine.
"Soviet Russian Literature Since
Stalin" is published by Cambridge
University Press. A soft cover edition is
to appear in the fall.
During the summer of 1979, Brown
will serve as director of a National En-
dowment for the Humanities Summer
Seminar for College Teachers at the
University of Washington on the subject
of Russian short fiction.

was already in effect and would total
one million barrels a day - more than
double the shortage in U.S. imports -
for the three summer months.
Deputy-White House press secretary
Rex Granum, who read to reporters a
three-paragraph announcement about
the increase, said it would extend "for a
significant and specific period of time,"
but that details would be announced by
the Saudi government.
The announcement said Carter had
received "a personal commitment
from Crown Prince Fahd." Granum
said the message had been relayed to
Robert Strauss, Carter's special Middle
East envoy, and John West, the U.S.
ambassador to Saudi Arabia, in a
meeting in Riyadh last week with Fahd,
the most powerful figure in the Saudi
royal family.'
GRANUM STRESSED that although
Strauss was visiting the Saudi city in
connection with his Middle East
negotiating role, there was no quid pro
quo relationship established to gain the
Begin, Sadat
for three-day
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt (AP) -
Egypt's Anwar Sadat and Israel's
Menachem Begin begin three days of
summitry in this Mediterranean resort
today, continuing their "getting-to-
know-you-better" dialogue.
Both Egyptian and Israeli officials
caution against expecting a dramatic
breakthrough in negotiations on
Palestinian autonomy at the meeting,
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 40-S
Tuesday, July 10, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
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commitment of increased production.
Saudi Arabia, which supports the
Palestinians, has strongly opposed the
Egyptian-Israeli peace agreement.
The White House announcement said
only that "the personal message to the
president made clear that the Saudi
decision is based on their historic frien-
dly relationship with the United States,
and their commitment to be a depen-
dable supplier of oil to the world."
Carter, who last week was sharply
critical of the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries, of
which Saudi Arabia is a key member,
yesterday "expressed the appreciation
of the American people for this
decision," the White House statement
said.
"He wishes to emphasize, however,
that while the increased production will
be helpful in the short term, it does not
relieve the United States or other oil
consuming nations of the necessity for
firm action to reduce significantly their
dependence on imported oil," it said.
in Egypt
discussion
the seventh between the two former ad-
versaries.
"At this point, it is the process that is
important because it sets the
psychological climate for the results
that must come later," said a close ad-
viser to the Egyptian president.
THE EXPANSION of the original
one-day schedule to 48 hours over three
days prompted speculation that Sadat
and the Israeli prime minister would
try to capitalize on the procedural
breakthrough at last week's round of
talks on autonomy for the 1.1 million
Palestinian Arabs living in the Israeli-
occupied West Bank of the Jordan
River and the Gaza Strip.
At those sessions, U.S. Mideast envoy
Robert Strauss orchestrated an
agreement by both sides to -set up
working groups to study key issues,
rather than continue their wrangling
over an agenda.
U.S. Ambassador Alfred Atherton
flew here from Cairo yesterday, met
with Sadat at the Egyptian leader's
summer residence, and conveyed a
message from President Carter on the
outcome of Strauss" meetings over the
weekend with officials in Jordan and
Saudi Arabia. Its contents were not
divulged.-
IN THEIR TALKS with Strauss, Jor-
dan's King Hussein and Saudi Crown
Prince Fahd reiterated their nations'
opposition to the Egyptian-Israeli
negotiations.

Teaching Fellowships
for
Graduate Students
are now available through the
PILOT PROGRAM
Deadline-July 13
The Pilot Program is an innovative, residential
educational program sponsored by LS&A and the
Housing Division.
TO APPLY:
1) Fill in a Pilot/LS&A application available from Alice Lloyd
Hall, 100 Observatory St. (764-7521).
2) Fill in a Housing opplication available from Ms. Charlene
Coady, 1500 S. A. B. (763-3161).

.k ' , :r t' I fit t I. 1,1 0 .. a 1-14A

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