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June 08, 1979 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-06-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, June 8, 1979-Page 5
PROTEST HIGH FUEL COSTS, 55 MPH LIMIT
Truckers block traffic in wildcat strike

From the Associated Pressofteruktain"Teod
Independent truckers blocksded of the truck station. "The indep
truck stops and brought traffic to a truckers have a very, very valid
crawl on major highways yesterday in We sympathize with them."
,a geared-up wildcat protest in at least Merk said the price of diesel f
14 states over rising diesel fuel costs. his station has increased 21 pe
The truckers gained strongest sup- since Jan 1 and is now selling ft
port in the West and Midwest, but track cents a gallon.
stop blocades and other protests also THE INDEPENDENT Tru
occurred in Connecticut and Florida. Association (ITA) has not sanc
POLICE IN Milford, Conn., arrested the strike, and the truckers to
six truckers who left their rigs parked their action a wildcat protest ov
and locked for six hours in front of price and shortage of diesel fuel, t
pumps at the Mayflower Truck Station mph speed limit and other grieval
Inc. They were charged with criminal In Indiana, truckers parked 20
trespass and breach of peace. four abreast across a one-mile s
"There was no violence," said of the Indiana Toll Road, near
Howard Merk, executive vice president blocking the toll road and a sect
Mass. to cut state
paid abortion funds
BOSTON (AP) - Massachusetts, on- nment employees, including tea
ce known for its liberal welfare from receiving health insu
benefits, is getting ready to sharply coverage for voluntary abortions.
reduce the number of state-subsidized Although Massachusetts has h
abortions. The move could affect not anti-abortion law on its books forr
only low-income women but tens of a year, implementation has
thousands in the middle class as well. delayed by federal lawsuita, broul
A bill on Gay. Edward King's desk birth-control clinics. While the
tightens existing state law by battles continued, the state W
eliminating financial aid for abortions Department was under federal
sought by rape and incest victims. Un- orders to keep providing abo
der the new measure, the state would whenever a doctor believes the n
finance only those abortions necessary needs one for her phs)ysic
to save s mother's life, psychological health.
King, a conservative Democrat who That language has allowed Me
won office last fall campaigning again- to pay for more than 5,000 of the
st abortion, crime, and taxes, plans to abortions performed in Massach
sign the bill within a few days, accor- in the past year.
ding to his legislative aides.
If the new law survives court Last month, the U.S. Supreme
challenges planned by its opponents, it refused to hear a suit ag
will have an impact that extends far Massachusetts' existing anti-abi
beyond those women who depend on the law, but left the door open for r
state to pay their doctor bills. Besides sideration. Challengers are
curbing Medicaid abortion benefits, it preparing a second request for a
also forbids all state and local gover- court review.

endent
point.
fuel at
w cent
or 87.9
ickers
tioned
ermed
er the
the 55-
nces.
0 rigs
ection
Gary,
ion of

Interstate 94.
The truckers began lining up about
midnight and remained until shortly
before the morning rush hour yester-
day, state police said. The protest came
after officials slapped a 25-gallon
ceiling on diesel fuel purchases, down
from 50 gallons, along the toll road this
week.
"WE JUST can't make a living on 55
mph," one trucker said. "Our pockets
are emptied every time we fill up our
tanks."
In Wyoming, a convoy of a dozen rigs
slowed to 25 mph on Interstate 80 at
Rock Springs yesterday before disper-
sing without incident. The convoy was
passing through desolate section of
Wyoming known as the Red Desert,
where the 55-mph speed limit is
frequently ignored.
"It's kind of ironic," said one
Wyoming highway patrol officer. "It's
the first time any of those truckers ever
observed the speed limit. Maybe they
should have raised the price of fuel
before."
INDEPENDENT HAULERS in

Oregon blocked two large truck stops in
the Portland area yesterday, and Dave
Crandall, organizer of the protest in the
state, said a planned shutdown was
gathering steam.
"We feel like we're being effective,"
said Crandall. "We feel that by this
weekend we should have the whole
West Coast shut down."
Truckers staged protests at several
truck stops in Minnesota, but two major
stops on Interstate 90 were both pum-
ping fuel.
"THERE ARE some stations still
open," said Rick Leistico, one of nearly
40 truckers blocking pumps at Clear-
water Truck Plaza on Interstate 94,
south of St. Cloud. "But we're hoping to
have them all covered before long."
Rodney Nelson, one of the protesters
at a truck stop near Rochester, Minn.,
said he would remain "until something
finally happens, until we get some at-
tention so that they know in
Washington."
"If I go out and drive, I'm not going to
make any money. I'm just wearing out
my truck," he said.

chers,
rance
ad an
nearly
been
fght by
legal
Velfare
court
rtions
:other
al or
dicaid
36,000
usetts
Court
ainst
ortion
recon-
now
high-

CINEMA II presents
Classic 30's Musical Night-Double Feature
TOP HAT
(MARK SANDRICH, 1953)
GINGER ROGERS and FRED ASTAIRE in one of their most delightful and fanciful
pictures. The plot takes second place to the high-stepping of the most dynamic
dancing duo ever to hit the silver screen. Disco, move over! (105 min.) 7:30 only
GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933
BUSBY BERKELY, MERVYN LEROY, 1933
Dig it. DICK POWELL using a can opener to get into RUBY KEELER's metal dress.
GINGER ROGERS and hundreds of chorus girls dressed in nothing but gigantic
coins, singing "Were in the Money.' (98 min.). 9:30 only.
DuUBAEnEATU$1.50
Aud.A Anell allDOUBLE FEATURE $2.50

State officials file appeal
of welfare abortion ruling

(Continued from Pages)
oing his ruling yesterday morning.
UNDER THE order, the state now
can pay only for those abortions
"required for the medical treatment of
the mother as certified by a licensed
physician."
The Department of Social Services
said it is in the process of notifying
physicans and local branch offices, so
Warren's ruling can be complied with
"as quickly as possible."
As a result of the circuit court-ruling,
the state is prohibited from authorizing
or funding any "elective" abortions.
ALL BILLS submitted for abortions
now must be accompanied by a signed
physician's statement that must read:
"I certify that this abortion was

medically required for the treatment of
this recipient."
Warren's order, and the state's plan-
ned appeal, are the latest in a series of
legislative and court struggles over the
use of tax dollars for welfare abortions.
Milliken three times has vetoed
legislation to curtail welfare abor-
tions-twice through Medicaid ap-
propriations bills and once in a simple,
flat-out ban.
The governor said it would be unfair
to deny poor women a legal medical
procedure which it afforded to more
wealthy ones.
An estimated 14,000 state-paid abor-
tions were performed last year, at a
cost of $3.5 million.

Akira Kurosawa's 1954
SEVEN SAMURI
Perhaps the best known of Japanese films, this epic tale of
a band of samuri defending a village against raiding bandits
has a driving musical score, complicated subplots, and dynamic
photography. Starring TOSHIRO MIFUNG. Japanese with sub-
titles.
Sat: Hawk's HIS GIRL FRIDAY
Sun: Fritz Lang's M (Free at 8)
CINEMA GUILD ,NIGHA OLQACH. AUD.

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