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April 21, 1979 - Image 59

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-04-21

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The Michigan Daily--Satirdoy April 211979-Page,15

some pe
howeve
African
with opj
prove t}
cising n
vocal a
WCCAA
Regen
Wh c

. .i .rm* and what will they do next?
(Continued from Page 14) former Senate Advisory Committee for
University Affairs chairman. "Why probably not have addressed these Daniel Fusfeld to describe h
ople feel about it." Brown said, that is, I couldn't say." issues. They would have been content to opinion of the task ahead.
r, that the failure of the South The reason could be that faculty rest on the "review" they conducted in "Whatever bus comes alon
government and corporations members have felt the divestment issue October. Regents will be the last ones t
erations in South Africa to im- does not affect them enough to deserve But whether or not the Regents will it," Cox said.
he situation for blacks is exer- thought. Another possibility, of course, totally divest from corporations doing And while most coalition me
nore influence on him than the is that faculty members have con- business in South Africa, and when, if seem convinced the Regents wil
nd disruptive activity of the sidered the issue and think of they do, are still open questions. the bus, none of them is quite su
divestiture as the wrong route. Univer- Demonstrator Geoff Cox paraphrased a much prodding will be necess
it James Waters (D-Muskegon) sity's governing faculty body, the comment by University economist make them do so.
dgr bilinlu fn thn i-f*tn ._

is own
ng, the
o catch
embers
1 catch
re how
ary to

-nsaapuoiciy or te t irst time
Thursday he is "definitely leaning
towards divestiture"-agreed with
Brown.
"AtBthis point, after looking at
everything again, I don't think much
significant change has happened in
South Africa and I don't think it's going
to," Waters said.
WHILE THE WCCAA's public'
clashes with the Regents receive much
attention, the group is quietly working
behind the scenes to help its cause.
While 150 demonstrators were mar-
ching on the Diag and on Regents
Plaza, a group of black students were
meeting discreetly with Waters to ask

Senate Assembly, voted to condemn the
tactics used in last month's disruption
of the Regents meeting.
THE WCCAA and its supporters
could also increase their credibility if
more black students and community
membes showed up at their demon-
strations. While Kamara said he felt
black students were adequately
represented at yesterday's protest in
the Union ballroom, Taylor conceded,
"a large percentage of the coalition is
not black," and Weiss said the small
proportion of black members is
"something we're working on." Taylor
added, however, that the WCCAA's af-
filiation with black organizations is

r
Ydgnd Gum laude

The> WCCAA is 'perhaps
making us realize more
full- than we otherwise
would, how strongly th'>y
,el about it (direstment),
or how strongly- some peo-
ple fel about it.'
-Regent Paul Brown

AWARD TH
HIGH HON
DISTINGUI
EMINENT I
OF THE CL
PEN & PEN
12 OR 14 KT
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ORS WITH THE
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ICIL COMBINATION
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12 KT. List $30
A Ours $25
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for his support on the issues of black
enrollment, attrition, recruiting, and
divestment. Taylor mentioned the WC-
CAA will be soliciting support in other
parts of the state this summer. And ac-
cording to WCCAA spokeswoman Judy
Weiss, the coalition will soon concen-
trate on cementing its contacts with
larger regional anti-apartheid groups,
elected officials and pro-divestment ef-
forts at other colleges and universities.
Such efforts are important to the
coaliton right now. With the end of the
academic year, the vast majority of the
University's students will leave Ann
Arbor for the next four months and they
will likely leave consideration of the
divestment issue behind them. The
WCCAA is now faced with the problem
of sustaining the momentum it has
created in the past two months.
Coalition members say they can do
this. Taylor explained that some
representatives will be in Ann Arbor
this summer to publicize the issue as
they have for the last two months. He
also said that many coalition members
are underclass students and will thus be
able to continue to push for divestment
in the next few years if necessary.
IT IS ALSO important for the
coalition to increase its support among
the University's faculty. An important
lesson learned by the student Left in the
1960's was that student demands
carried added weight when accom-
panied by faculty support. And 110
faculty signatures on a petition-while
significant-is not enough.
"I would just perceive that there has
not been a great faculty participation in
at least the formal actions of the
coalition," said Prof. Shaw Livermore~~

evidence that blacks are represented in
the group.
Despite these minor difficulties, it is
clear that the demonstrators who have
brought their case to the Regents in the
last two months, have won several
significant victories. The pressure
brought on the Board seems to have
prompted Friday's public discussion of
University divestment from two cor-
porations, Black and Decker and G.D.
Searle, which refuse to comply with the
Sullivan Principles. The entire divest-
ment issue is currently under review
for a second time by the Senate Ad-
visory Committee for Financial Affairs
(SACFA), and will be considered by the
Regents when that group makes its
report to the Regents (See related
story, Page 2). Without pressure from
the demonstrators, the Regents would

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