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May 22, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SDoily-Tuesday,May 22, 1979-Page 3,
City Council
avoids action
on rezoning
resolutions
By JOHN GOYER
After listening to a group of Ann
Arbor citizens speak out against
proposed office and housing develop-
ments on the city's south side, the city
council last night tabled six rezoning
resolutions which would pave the way
for such construction.
Many of those who spoke at the
meeting said the increased traffic
resulting from the developments would
harm the environment of the south
side. They also expressed concern over
the lack of demonstrated need for such
developments in that area of the city.
IN ADDITION, council tabled until
Thursday a proposed 23 per cent in-
crease in sewage rates, at the recom-
mendation of Assistant City Ad-
ministrator Patrick Kenney.
Kenney told council that the city had
not yet received estimates from
developers on the amount which would
be paid through surcharges on permits
to connect to the city's sewer system.
If developers agree to permit sur-
charges, the proposed 23 per cent in-
crease could be reduced to 10 per cent.
KENNEY ALSO said the city had not
yet arrived at a firm estimate of how
much the sludge hauling will cost the
city. The city's original estimate of a 23
per cent rate increase has already been
reduced to l8oper cent.
A 23 per cent increase would add
r- about $15 per year to the average
g homeowners utilities bill.
e Developer Patricia Dion, of Dion
e Builders, spoke against increases in
A building permit fees during the public
d hearings portion of the meeting. She
e pointed out that the city's building
department had a surplus of $41,000 in
its budget for the past year.
n- KENNEY SAID the surplus was in-
n significant, and he added that the
n building department's operating ex-
tn penses are twice that of its revenues
from permit fees.
Even though Council later tabled ac-
a tion on the permit fee increases, Dion
questioned why the items were on the
n agenda at all, as Mayor Belcher and
m City Administrator Murray had infor-
m mally assured her Friday that the
w items would be tabled.
Mayor Pro-tem Gerald Bell (R-Fifth
See REZONING, Page 12

Daily Pnoto byLISA uvo
Up on the roof
This view of West Quad dorm from the top of the Michigan Union could have inspired Escher's famous illusion.

FREEDOM OF SPEECH REPORT ALSO PRESENTED:

B
New gu
to xinform
approved
Senate As
the acad
guideline
staff, an
personali
The pl
responsil
Universit
of inforr
linked sys
THE Al
revision o
committe
faculty m
tober 1978
Medica
ted the gi
said it wa
r

New privacy guidelines approved
y PATRICIA HAGEN take years of implementation in the suggestions for action to help chairper
idelines on privacy and access schools and colleges." sons deal with disturbances durin
nation were overwhelmingly The plans still must be approved University functions:
I by the University faculty formally by the University Board of " Assessing the amount of tim
semblyat the final meeting of Regents. necessary for the speaker to complet
lemic year yesterday. The SENATE ASSEMBLY members also the presentation as planned an
es give University faculty, received a report from the ad hoc allowing a reasonable period fo
d students more control over committee reviewing Freedom of, questions and answers should guide th
information. Speech guidelines. "We did report that chairperson in removal of disruptors.
ans outline the rights and the guidelines worked relatively well," . The chairperson should try to con
bilities of individuals and said Corpron, committee chairman and sider the nature of the disturbance, sir
.y officials concerning the use new chairman of the Senate Assembly. ce the application of the guidelines to a
nation in University name- The report was requested after con- isolated or spontaneous inciden
stems of records. cern was expressed over the handling necessarily may differ from a
PPROVED privacy rules are a of a disturbance last December at a lec- organized disruption.
f a report first submitted by a ture by Yigal Allon, former minister " Disruptors removed from
e of administrative officials, and deputy prime minister of Israel. University function should also b
embers, and students in Oc- In the report, members of the ad hoc removed from the building.
. committee concluded that the present The report also said ratification of a
1 Prof. William Lands presen- guidelines "withstood a most rigorous, amended University Judiciary Syster
uidelines to the Assembly and emotional test of their adequacy." is essential, because it would allo
as the "first step in what will THE REPORT included several members of the University communit
A 1See ASSEMBLY, Page 13

-today

I

A l/you need is love
The London Daily Express reported yesterday
that the Beatles came closer to a reunion last
weekend than any other time since the famous
foursome broke up in 1969. The occasion was a
celebration of the marriage of George Harrison's
former wife Patti Boyd to guitarist Eric Clapton.
John Lennon was the only ex-Beatle who didn't
show up. 'Harrison, Paul McCartney, and Ringo
Starr performed Beatles hits from the 1960s for
about 200 guests. Patti Boyd and Harrison divorced
in 1977. Clapton's mansion at Ewhurst, Surrey,
about 20 miles from London, was the site for the
private concert.
Star-spangled tribute
A gaggle of Hollywood stars testified.yesterday in

tribute to cancer-striken actor John Wayne, and
leading the pack was the perennial Elizabeth
Taylor, wife of Sen. John Warner (R-Va.). The
House banking subcommittee passed a measure 6 to
0 to issue a gold medal to Wayne, the star of 200
films. Subcommittee members listened to tributes
from Taylor, actress Maurine O'Hara, warbler"
Frank Sinatra, and Rep. Barry Goldwat5er, Jr. (R-
Calif.). "Kids today," said Taylor, "talk about cool.
Well, Big John is one cool cat. He is a giant and he.
will be with us always." O'Hara, wiping back tears,
said, "He is the United States of America." Even
President Carter threw in a few good words. "John
Wayne personifies the true American character,"
he wrote in a latter to the subcommittee's chairper-
son. "His true grit helped win the West, World War
11, and the hearts of thousands of us ... " Wayne,
71, is hospitalized in California for cancer treatmen-
ts.

Happenings ...
... enjoy the sunshine until 4 p.m., when Prof.
Aubrey Jenkins of the University of Sussex,
England, will speak at the colloquium, "Vinyl
Polymerization Initiated by Titanium Amides," in
Room 3005 of the Chemistry Building.. . the School
of Music and the Center for South and Southeast
Asian Studies are co-sponsoring a presentation of
Indian Folk Music, at the poolside near the School of
Music building at 7 p.m. In case of rain, the concert
will be performed in the Recital Hall ... on the
Diag at 8 p.m., there will be a protest against the
planned executions of two Florida inmates.
On the outside
The weather remains the same as yesterday, with
sunshine, winds, 5 to 15 miles per hour, and a high in
the mid-60s. It'll be nippy tonight, though. The low
will be in the mid-40s.

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