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May 12, 1979 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-05-12

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Page 8-Saturday, May 12, 1979-The Michigan Daily
STUDENTS IN BIND USE SERVICE:
Pre-written term papers readily available

(Contnuedfrom Page 1)
In addition to lots of money, a lack of morals and
some luck are good companions for students who
choose to buy their way through homework assign-
ments.
The University considers turning in purchased
term papers plagiarism. Students who are caught
may appear before the LSA judicicary, where
penalties are given according to individual cases. In
the past, students caught handing in purchased
papers have failed the respective course and been
placed on probation.
THE LAST SUCH case was in 1971 when two
students were caught turning in the same paper, but
professors and administrators say they are under
no illusions that this type of behavior hasn't been
going on the last eight years.
"I have a hunch that the percentsges are Afar
higher than anyone knows," said Psychology Prof.
Daniel Weintraub.
Professors and teaching assistants (TAs) tell
stories of students whom they suspect have turned
in a "professional" term paper, but say that ac-
cusing the student is difficult.

"THE AWFUL THING is that you have no way of
knowing," said Bert Hornback, an English
Language and Literature professor.
"I'm probably naive, but I assume that because I
require a lot of work from students, they'll be smart
enough to-get out if they aren't going to do the
work," he continued. "There are some people who
won't assign papers any more because of that sort
of thing (buying papers)."
Weintraub admits hefalls into the latter category.
"I don't require papers any more (in introductory
psych courses) because it's an open invitation for
students to go out and buy something," he said.
EVEN THOUGH PROFESSORS say they have
difficulty spotting research papers, there are some
instances in which the paper itself is a dead
giveaway. A student has no way of knowing,
especially if he is dealing with a local firm, whether
someone else in his class will have the same subject
idea and turn in an identical paper. And an English
TA tells a story about a professor who received a
paper he, himself, had written as an undergraduate.
For these reasons, local firms have a hard time
staying in business in Ann Arbor. According to

University Counsel Roderick Daane, it's not illegal
for a company to write term papers, but it is "con-
trary to public policy in Michigan." He clarified
that it is difficult for a business which openly admits
that its function is to supply term papers for studen-
ts to obtain a license from the state. Misrepresen-
ting a business's services (e.g. claiming to edit
papers when the business actually writes them) is
illegal.
About ten years ago the University sued one such
Ann Arbor based firm, "Write-on," and forced
them out of business. Today, there's another firm
in town with what Daane called "that incredibly nif-
ty title-Write-on." Run by a self-proclaimed "Ex-
perienced Professional" Joan Hutchinson, "Write-
on" does not write papers for students, but will
rewrite a rough draft or do research for a student
and prepare a synopsis. She could not be reached
for comment on her services.
Pacific Research and Collegiate Research, two
out-of-state companies that advertise heavily on
campus declined to comment on the services they
provide.

NyTREX, eity disagree
on liability for sludge

(Continuedfrom Page 1)
who were eager to use itas fertilizer.
Until recently, the DNR refused to
allow NyTREX to dump the sludge on
fields in Washtenaw County.
CITY OFFICIALS learned 4Wed-
nesday night that NyTREX had been
spreading Ann Arbor's sludge on fields
in southwestern Washtenaw County
without the knowledge or consent of
city officials.
According to Abbott, the city pays
NyTREX nearly $2,000 per day to truck.
the sludge, with about one quarter of
that sum earmarked for fuel to Ohio.
Although Abbott said the sludge from
Ann Arbor's plant contains only low
amounts of harmful substances, the
city's contract with NyTREX specifies
that the city is not responsible for the
sludge after it leaves the plant..
LOWE CLAIMED Wednesday the
city is liable for any possible damage to
the environment.
City Administrator Sylvester Murray
said yesterday that although the city
was unsure whether Lowe had violated

the contract, "the city isn't going to be
responsible, unless the city is involved
in the decision (to use the sludge' in
Michigan)."
The DNR holds the city responsible
for disposal of the sludge, according to
Richard Sprague, who issues sludge
disposal permits for the DNR.
Sprague said he has not issued a writ-
ten permit for NyTREX to spread
sludge in Washtenaw County.
Sprague also said by giving NyTREX
verbal permission in late April to
spread the sludge on fields in
Washtenaw County instead of in Ohio,
he was following the spirit of
Michigan's Solid Waste Act (P.A. 641).
This law states that Michigan sludge
should be disposed of in Michigan,
Sprague said.
NyTREX owner Lowe accused
Sprague and the DNR of interpreting
the law and dragging its feet on issuing
a permit for sludge disposal in
Washtenaw County. "Dick Sprague
said clear back in April, 'you'll have
your permit in five days."'

-- ,
Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
SEWAGE FLOWS through a waste processing pool, just one of the many stages
of purification.

Sunday, May 13 Aud. A Angell Hall
DAY OF THE DOLPHIN
(MIKE NICHOLS, 1976)
GEORGE C. SCOTT as the marine scientist who discovers the secret of com-
municating with dolphins. His program is infiltrated by men intent upon
using the trained dolphins to assassinate the President. A truly exciting
film, TRISH VAN DEVERE and PAUL SORVINO. "MA, Pa!
Tonight at ($ \ Tickets
7:30 & 9:30 $1.50 each
Cinema ii is now accepting new member applications. Pick them up at
all of our film showings.

Patti wi i sing for DSO

theAnn/Arbor'Film Cooperative presents at MLB 3
SATURDAY, MAY 12 $1.50
EAST OF EDEN
(Elia Kazan, 1955) 7 only-MLB3
Kazan's adaptation of Steinbeck's novel was the film that turned a talented
stage-TV actor named JAMES DEAN into a superstar. Dean plays Carl Trask,
a confused adolescent desperately seeking approval. The honesty of his
performance prompted director Kazan to say, "Dean didn't play Cal, he was
Cal." "In James Dean, today's youth discovers itself."-Truffaut.
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
(Nicholas Ray, 1955) 94only-MLB 3
A teenager gets into trouble in school and runs away with his girlfriend.
There are many reasons to see REBEL, but James Dean overshadows them all
with his best screen nerformance. With NATALIE WOOD, DENNIS HOPPER
JIM BACKUS, and SAL MINEO. PLUS: JAMES DEAN INTERVIEW (1955).
Scenes from an early TV role precede Dean's interview with Gig Young.
TUESDAY: Free showing of Renoir's THE RULES OF THE GAME
and WOMEN ON THE BEACH

(coninuedfrom PugeSeven)
to the crowd about the goals of the
Symphony."
Today, a dream comes true for the
happy couple. "We're meeting the
maestro," Fred beamed. 'It's an
honor," Patti added, "But I'm still a
happy fan. It's really exciting to meet
someone I'm a big fan of."
As I left, Fred asked if I had ever seen
the DSO. Meekly, I confessed I never

had. "I want you to go," he said, "and I
want you to call me after you go and tell
me how you liked it. I think you'll be
surprised how wonderful it is to hear a
hundred musicians playing at the same
time. And go more than once and get an
idea of the variety of sound they can
produce."
"But be sure Dorati is conducting,"
Patti added.

David Leoan's 1965
DR. ZHIV AGO
"David Lean's Dr. Zhivtgo does for snow what Lawrence of Arabia did for
sand."-John Simon, screenplay by Robert Bolt from Nobel winner Boris Paster-
nak's novel about a Russian doctor who lives through the revolution. Over-
whelming musical score from the appropriately named Maurice Jaree. With
OMAR SHARIFF, ROD STEIGER, ALEC GUINNESS. & JULIE CHRISTIE.
Sunday free showing (at 8:00 only)
Stroheim's FOOLISH WIVES
Fri. (May 18) OKLAHOMA

CINEMA GUILD

OLD ARCH AUD
st-So

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