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May 05, 1979 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, May 5, 1979-Page 9

Unemployment rises;

state's rate
(continued from Page 3)
coming may have had an impact."
"ALSO, THE thought is that because
of the holidays and some other things
the sample may have been off a little,"
he said.
It was too early to determine,
however, whether the sharp increase
signaled the start of an employment
downturn for Michigan, McGhee said.
The Carter- administration has
predicted that unemployment will in-
crease to 6.2 per cent this year as a
result of efforts to slow economic
growth to help control inflation.
report also showed that total em-
ployment declined by 670,000, or 6.9 per
cent, to 96.2 million during the month, a
sharp drop that was not expected. The
decline in jobs was the largest since
January 1968 when jobs fell 700,000.
Employment had been increasing at

hits 8.6%

a monthly average of 300,000 during the
previous eight months, and such a tur-
around in a single month could indicate
the economy is headed into a tailspin.
However, administration officials
sought to head off such an inter-
pretation.
"I don't think these figures signal
basic weakness in the economy," said
Lyle Gramley, a member of the
President's Council of Economic Ad-
visers. "My strong suspicion is that
there is something rather irregular
about these numbers which will get
reversed next month."
"It would be a major mistake in my
view to assume that something fun-
damental has happened in demand for,
and supply of, labor because of the
April numbers," Gramley added. He
said that before the government makes
any changes in its economic policies, it
should wait for the May jobs report.

I

DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES-Adults $1.50
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. tl 1:30 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. Noon ill 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30.5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

WOODY ALLEN
DIANE KEATON
3:15
MERYL STREEPA7:15
ANNE YRN mil iffA 10:00
ANNE BYRNE Fri & Sot
1200
MICHAEL MURPHY midnight
MARIEL HEMINGWAY A
10:00 3:30
2:45 6:45
9:30

South African police seek
anti-governfment guerrillas

SOWETO, South Africa (AP) -
Police teams searched house-to-house
in this black township yesterday for
three gunmen who killed a black
policeman and wounded five other per-
sons at a police station in the boldest at-
tack yet by anti-government black
guerrillas.
Justice and Police Minister James
Kruger said on national television he
expected early arrests.
"Good progress" is being made in the
investigation, he said. "By the very
nature of the case, the police cannot
reveal details of their progress."
THREE OVERALL-CLAD raiders
struck at about 9:10 p.m. Thursday,
storming the Moroka police station on
the main road through Soweto, just out-
side Johannesburg.
Firing AK-47 automatic rifles, they
cut down Constable Brian Temba, on
guard at the gate, and two black
civilians. Temba died yesterday of
multiple wounds.
Continuing on into the station, the
gunmen shot and seriously wounded
another policeman. A third policeman
and three civilians - two men and a
woman - suffered minor injuries. All
the victims were black.
"ACCORDING TO a black woman
eyewitness, she saw one of the at-
tackers throwing something into the
building ... which caused a tremen-
dous explosion," a police statement
said. "The building burst into flames.
"The three armed black men then left
the premises like they came - on
foot ... In the street outside the gate a
hand grenade of Russian origin was
found."
The guerrillas also scattered small
mimeographed leaflets around the
grounds that read: "Support the ANC
and Umknonto We Sizwe. Remember
June 1976. Remember Mahlangu. Take
up arms. Fight."
THE ANC IS the banned African
National Congress, of which Umknonto
We Sizwe (Spear of the Nation) is the
militant arm. June 1976 was the month
massive anti-government black
upheavals erupted in Soweto and
spread across the country.
Solomon Mahlangu, a black guerrilla,
was hanged in early April for his part in
the shooting deaths of two whites in

Johannesburg.
After the 1976 disturbances an
unknown number of black youths from
Soweto - a community of some one
million blacks - and other black town-
ships left the country forinsurgency
training in black African states.
FOR THE PAST year or more there
have been reports of infiltration back
into South Africa and isolated attacks
by armed young blacks in what is
clearly an incipient underground war
against this nation's white-minority
control and apartheid system of racial
segregation.
Police said Thursday's Soweto attack
was the third on a police station by
black guerrillas but the first in which
armed men actually entered a station.
The other attacks, in Soweto in 1976 and
Johannesburg in 1977, involved bombs
lobbed in from outside. No one was in-
jured in those attacks.
The black guerrillas are believed to
have their external bases in neigh-
boring Botswana.
The hours
are long,
but that's
the pay is
But as a volunteer
you'll get to help America
stand a little taller. And you'll
stand a little taller yourself.
America needs your help or
we wouldn't beasking. Your
community needs your help.
People 18 or 80: we don't care
as long as you do. VISTA is
coming alive again. Come alive
with us. VISTA. Call toll free:
800-424-8580. visTA

FRI.
SAT.
12:00
MID-
NIGHT
No matches, lighters, or other
open flame of any type.

FRI.
SAT.
12:00
MID-
NIGHT

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