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April 20, 1979 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-04-20

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Page 6-Friday, April 20, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Finals arriving as
study slump sets in

(Continued frorPage 3)
Greg Roda, who was working on a
Spanish paper. 'I'm taking advantage
of study days," he explained. During
the term Roda claimed that he studied
about two hours a day, and said "I have
t a rule of no studying on weekends."
Charley Sneed shared Roda's laid-
back attitude towards studying. "If I
can stay away from the bars I'll do it
tonight." He studies more "when the
pressure is on" just before a test.
On Wednesday and Thursday after-
noons the tennis and basketball courts
and track at Palmer Field were
crowded with athletes. Bodies on towels
dotted the hills behind the dormitories.
A rather sweaty pair emerged fromt he
tennis courts and explained how they
could spare the study time. "One
final," said one, and her partner grin-
ned, "No finals."
OTHER STUDENTS were more
worried about their impending tests.
They trudged to the libraries with
bulging knapsacks begining at 8:00
a.m. Sleepy pre-meddies and panic-
stricken souls who haven't cracked a
book since midterms filled the libraries
by mid-morning reading for - a
marathon study session with textbooks
and notes.
On the fifth floor of the Grad, Kathy

Stefanof, a LSA sophomore, took a
short break from studying accounting.
"I usually try to get one of the big
typing carrols," she explained. "I got
here at five after eight and they were,
all gone." Stefanof said she planned to
stay, "until I can't stand the Grad
anymore.
Diehard students remained in the
libraries for hours. "Quite a few stay
until about 2:00 a.m.," said, Andrea
Phillips, a student worker at the Un-
dergraudate Library. On Wednesday
night about 20 students stayed until the
library closed at 5:00 a.m.
Even some professors were trying to
catch up at the end of the term. English
Professor Marie Ellman was working
in her Haven Hall office "trying to put
together an exam." "It always talkes
longer than I think it will," she ex-
plained.
"I'm grading papers," said Prof.
Thomas Toon, who teaches English and
a History of the English Language
course. "I should be doing something
more exciting," he added with a wistful
glance out his office window. Noting the
mid-day crowd of students enjoying the
warm weather on the Diag, he laughed,
"They're not preparing for that exam
I'm writing."

Board votes to maintain
Cellar's current structure

(Continued from Page3)
Cellar employee Ralph McKee, board
member and business school professor
Tim Nantell had considerable influence
in the board's decision. "Tim brough a
whole new light," said Jacobsen. "It
was Tim's motion, he duly deserves
credit." The board had expected to ap-
prove a structure developed by a com-
mittee consisting of several non-union
employees and management, accor-
ding to both Jacobsen and McKee. Nan-
tell was unavailable for comment last
night.
McKee presented statistical infor-
mation to the board during an open
meeting Tuesday afternoon. He said he

examined a survey conducted by'the
National Association of College Stores
(NASC) and determined that the Cellar
is seventh in the nation in terms of sales
per square foot.
"In terms of our limitations, we're
one of the most efficient store of this
kind in the country," said McKee.
"IT (THE structure) is not
traditional, but the work is getting
done," admitted Jacobsen.
At a closed meeting Tuesday night,
the board discussed the information it
had received from McKee and evidence
from its own financial records, said
Jacobsen. The board then voted in
public to maintain the current struc-
ture.

M-

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