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January 16, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-16

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Friday, January 16, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

page Seven

Friday, January 16, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page seven

Grand jury hears

nurses in

VA case

Pro-Western troops
flceing, U.S. informs
WASHINGTON (A' - T h e have some 200 technicians aid-
United States has informed its ing the Popular Movement for:
European allies that resistance the Liberation of Angola and,
to Marxist forces in northern according to Kissinger, has ship-
Angola has "all but collapsed" ped in close to "$200 million
and that pro-Western troops are 'worth of military equipment:
fleeing to the Zaire border, over the last nine months." '
sources said yesterdayv

A.... £ J ' ..£, Friday, January 16
Day Calendar
WUOM: Marvin Feiheim, "The
Medieval Inspiration of Modern
l 1es IFiems,"14:05 am,.
a Regents' meeting: Regents' Rm.,
11 am.
Ob Gyn Dept.: Ralph Di Gaetana.
dent blocked the publication of "The Applications of MIDAS,"
the two reports by saying dis- L2204 Women's Hosp., noon,
History, Ctr. for West European
closure "would be detrimental Studies: E. P. Thompsonr"The
to the national security." Sale of Wives in 18th Century Eng-
land," Lec. Rm. 1, MLB, noon.
Chairman Otis Pike (D-N.Y.) Educ. Communications Media:
confirmed he got a letter from Monument to the Dream; Sentinels
Ford on the reports the commit- of Silence, Schorling Aud., SEB,
KISSINGER told the envoysy teatdopbis.Bth

DETROIT (UPI) - Four
nurses employed by the local
Veterans Administration (VA)
hospital last summer testified
yesterday in Detroit before a
federal grand jury probing a
baffling series of breathing fail-
ures that resulted in 11 patient
deaths.
One of the witnesses, Leonora
Perez, 39, now an empoye of
the Chicago VA hospital, was
named in a copyrighted Ann Ar-
bor news story earlier this week
as a key suspect in the case.
ACCORDING to the News
story, the U. S. Attorney's office
in Detroit is preparing to re-
quest indictments for Perez and'
another VA nurse, Filipina Nar-
ciso, 29, who both worked in the
hospital's Intensive Care Unit
(ICU) last summer where all
the breathing failures and

A in "a1 n

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

deaths occurred.
Iowever, officials flatly de-
nied the story, terming it
"purely speculati e" and would
only say that "the investiga-
tion is continuing."
Officials also declined to say
whether they had accumulated
enough evidence in their five
month investigation to prepare
any indictment requests.
BOTH Perez and Narciso ap-
peared before the grand jury in
November but Perez was sub-
poenaed to reappear yesterday,
though officials declined to say
why she was asked to return.
Asked whether she was wor-
ried about the grand jury's in-
vestigation, Perez said, "No,
not really."
Perez spent three and a half
hours in the jury room and then

raced out of the federal build-1
ing with commenting on her
testimony.1
HER ATTORNEY, Thomas
O'Brien, also declined com-;
ment.1
Federal officials used slides
and charts of hospital floors in
an apparent effort to pinpoint
locations of employes when the'
deaths occured.
Officials declined to name
the other three nurses who tes-
tified yesterday or to reveal the
nature of their 30 minute testi-
monies.
FEDERAL sources said sev-
eral more witnesses will ap-
pear, but did not go into de-y
tail.
The grand jurors are probing
more than 50 breathing failures
which occurred over a two
month period, ending August 15
when the FBI entered the case.
Investigators determined that
someone deliberately injected
Pavulon, a powerful neruo-mus-
cular relaxant normally used
during surgery, to the unsus-
pecting patients.
AFTER hearing yesterday's
testimonies, the grand jury ad-I
journed for about two weeks.
Richard Delonis, chief of the'
U. S. Attornev's criminal divi-;
sion in Detroit said yesterday;
the grand jury would meet'
again to continue the investiga-'
tion, but not before Jan. 27.
"Today does not mark the'
end of their consideration of
this case" Delonis said.

ment baroque music, R. C. Aud., 8
pill.
Music School: Philharmonic Or-
chestra. Hill Aud., q pm; string bass
degree recital, Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Musical Society: Beaux Arts Trio,
Rackham Aud., 8:30 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7456
If you want a job or plan to at-
tend grad/professional school make
appt. with reps on-campus. Inter-
viewing at CP&P: Jan. 20; Or-
bach's Inc., Jan. 21; Prudential Life,
Jan. 22; So. Methodist U./Law,
Cargill, & U. of Toledo/Law.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB,PPhone: 763-4117
Interviews: Camp Tamarack, MI
Coed: Tues., 20 & Fri. 23 9-5. Open-
ings include counselors; supervis-
ors, drivers, cooks, nurses, special-
ists. Register in person or by phone
763-4117.
Camp Chi, Wise. Coed: Mon. Jan.
26 9-5. Openings include counselors,
specialists, tennis, waterfront, arts,
crafts, supervisors, etc., 763-4117.
Irish Hills C. S. Council, Jackson,
Mi: interview Weds. Jan. 21 9-5.
Openings include counselors, spe-
cialists. supervisors, many others,
R~egister.

Change in grad fee
structure planned.

.KISSINGER told the envoys tee wantedtpuls.Bth
Meanwhile, Secretary of State according to a high U.S. official, refused to give any details, say-
Henry Kissinger told diplomats that the United States supports ing the letter itself was stamped
from 37 African countries late withdrawal of South African "secret."
yesterday that he hopes the troops from Angola as a first Pike has never confirmed the
civil war in the former Portu- step toward removal of all for- sie he reports, th
guese colony can be settled eign forces. But he emphasized they have been disclosed by the
through negotiation within a that all military intervention tpesd s
month. must cease. press.
THE REPORT of the situation In the cable, Kissinger said ONE OF TIIE reports de-
along the northern front was there is no firm indication scribes previous CIA funding of
cabled by Kissinger to the North whether South Africa intends to moderate political parties in
Atlantic Council in Brussels go ahead with plans to pull out Italy in an effort to prevent
Tuesday night. Sources said he-!Tits troops from Angola. Communist election gains.
informed the allies that the Meanwhile, President F o r d The second report detailshU.S.
Marxist faction, heavily sup-imoved yesterday to block pub- support for two factions fighting
ported by Cuban troops, was ad- lication of House itelligence:t already beco oe ubic as
vancing rapidly in a drive to- committee reports on U.S. co-ap
ward the border with Zaire. 1vertoperationssin Angola and
InesenAglItaly, sources said. Second baseman Dave Cash of
In eastern Angoja, Kissinger the Philadelphia Phillies led
related, a second pro-Western UNDER TERMS of an agree- National Leaguers in 1975 with
faction, backed by South Afri- ment worked out by Ford and 312 hits, three more than Pete
can, soldiers, had failed to se-|the committee after a confron- Rose of Cincinnati and Steve
cure a key railroad facility and tation in September, the Presi- Garvey of Los Angeles.
"virtuially all" fighting men of
the National Front for the Lib--
eration of Angola and their LEARN MODERN
Zairian allies were fleeing the
battlefield. i
Kissinger, in the meeting with,
African envoys at the State De-
nartment, said he planned to Course based on original method which utilizes the root
take up the possibility of a ne- relationships between Greek ad Fnlish. Learn Greek as
gotiated settlement in Moscow an extension of1English.
next week when he sees Soviet On Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7-9. Starts Jan.
leader Leonid Brezhnev about 20th at St. Nicholos Orthodox Church. For
prospects for ,a new nuclear Information
weapons treaty. The Russians
-...- -' 662-2801

z .
i
f,
'
s
.f
d'
h?
e
e

(Continued from Pag
-and pre-candidates a
ally a reversal of the
structure, according to
Dougherty, Assistant
Vice - President for A
Affairs.
Reduction in staffh
accomplished by not fil
tions that become vaca
man said that about 10
have 'been eliminated
way. He expects the p
continue, lout could no
by hbow much moret
would be trimmed.
Proposa
for SAL]
outlined
(Continued from Pag

22:10 pm.
Astronomy: Marc S. Allen, Mys-
teries of the Shell Closing: Astro-
physics at N equal 50," P&A Col-
loq. Rm., 4 pm. ..
U Club: Dinner theatre, Comic
Opera. The Zoo, Main Dining Rm..
7 pm.
Hockey: U-M vs. Notre Dame,
Yost Ice Arena, 7:30 pm.
Women's Basketball: U-M vs.
Wayne State, Crisler Arena, 8 pm.
- PTP: The Robber Bridegroom,
John Houseman's Acting Company,
Power, 8 pm.
t Residential College: Vocal, lnstru-

ge 1) THE REPORT has also en-
re basic- abled Rackham to identify and
revised 'eliminate work duplications and
Edward unnecessary paper work.
to the In the RRC report (more com-
Academic monly referred to as the "Ack-
lev' report after committee'
ha~s beenchairman Economics Professor
Ming ben also recommended that gradu-
ant. Suss- ate departments be solely re-
p itions sponsible for their own pro-
i nthis
rocess ty Burt Sussman said that Rack-
)t specify hanm will be giving departments
the staff more responsibility over certain
activities but not sole respon-
_s ibility.
Rhodes, in his draft letter,,
points out that Rackham shouldt
continue its present role of "re-
sponsibility for the approval of
new graduate degree pro-
grams."
The Rackham school is the
governing body over all M.A.'
~and Ph.D. programs except
those for degrees in professions,
ge 1) such as Medicine or Law. Suss-

i
i
f
i
's

FRIDAY at HILLEL
JANUARY 16
5:00 P.M.-MINYAN DAVENING
5:30 P.M.-RAMAH DAVEN ING
6:15 P.M.-SHABBAT DINNER
8:00 P.M.-REFORM SERVICE
AT BETH EMETH
(7:30- -transporttion will beprovided)
8:30 P.M.-ONEG SHABBAT
AT HEBREW HOUSE
make dinner reservations by 1 p.m Friday
GRAD SHABBAT DINNER POSTPONED TO FEBRUARY 27

new treaty while in Mos-,w. man pointed out that there are
Instead, he hopes to reach an , also occasional exceptions in
agreement on the princinies that such schools as Architecture,
would guide technical neg%>a- Library Science, Public Health
tions. and others.

i
1
I
.

TICKETS NOW ON SALE
$4.00
Hill Auditorium
Box Office
The Blind Pg
and both Discount
Record stores
Les McCann
AND
MIXED BAG
Wed., Jan.. 21st
Michigan Union Ballroom
First Show 8:00, Second Show10:30
Doors open at 7:30

West Side Book Shop
Fine Used, Rare and Out-of-Print
Books Bought and Sold
a MODERN FIRSTS
a AMERICAN INDIANS
a POETRY
a MUSIC
a AMERICANA
* OCCULT
113 W. Li berty-995-1891
MON.-SAT.: 11:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M.
THURS., FRI. NITES TILL 9:00 P.M.
- n
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC
BEERS & WINES & COCKTAILS
NOW OPEN
SUNDAYS
11:30 a.m. 'til 8 p.m.
NO 8-8987
203 E. WASHINGTON
Between 4th & 5th Ave.

r , r
-_

Information reaching NATO
diplomats in London suggested
dim prospects of advances. One
informant said it is up to the
Soviet leadership to come up
with proposals that will match
or improve on ideas advanced'
by the U.S. government.
However, the chances of a
successful Kissinger mi *on
were considered good by U.S.
officials, since Kissinger was
invited to Moscow to meet with.
Soviet Communist party leader'
Leonid Brezhnev.
IF THE Russians were Pot
serious about reaching an agree-
ment, one official said, Brezh-
nev would not have asked Kis-
singer to come.
Even under this optimistic
light, it is unlikely that a final
agreement can be reached for'
some time.
Kissinger told his news con-
ference that, "under the best
of circumstances,, it would take
another two or three months"
to work out the detailed pro-
visions of a final accorld.
YESTERDAY Kissinger added
Denmark, Belgium and Spain
to .his 'itinerary.
The State Department said
Kissinger would stop in Copen-
hagen next Tuesday, en route to
Moscow for talks with Prime
Minister Anker Jorgensen and
Foreign Minister K. 3. Ander-
sen.
He will brief the North Atlan-
tic Council in Brussels after his
Moscow talks on Jan. 23 and
then fly to Madrid to meet
Spanish government ufficials
and King Juan Carlos.

i11

GAYNESS AND SPIRITUALITY
People of many different spiritual paths who relate positively to gayness meet each.
SUNDAY at 3 p.m. at CANTERBURY HOUSE on the corner of Catherine and Divi-
sion. Upcomina discussion topics are:
JANUARY 18: Social Meetinq, no planned topic
JANUARY 25: The Significance of Romantic and Sexual Fantasies
FEBRUJARY 1; Gay Marrioqes
FEBRUARY 8: Relatinq to Parents and Relatives About Gayness
FEBRUARY 15: Should Gay People Work Inside or Outside Existinq Institutions
FEBRUARY 22: Spirituality in Music, Literature, and the Arts
FEBRUARY 29: Rights of Gay People Under the Law
Meetings usually include an introduction to the topic by group members and/or
invited guests, followed by discussion in small groups. Some time is set aside at the end
for reflection in the style of a Quaker meeting. There is a social hour from 4:30 to 5:30.
SUNDAYS AT 3 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. DIVISION-Telephone 665-0606

I

I

I

Sa GYROS . . A delicious continental special-
ty, the GYROS is a lean blend of
and you've said a mouthful / specialy selected portions of
beef and lamb. It is lightly sea-
soned and cooked to sear the
outside and seal the juice and
flavor inside. The meat is cook-
ed to order on the Autodoner,
which gives it that "charcoal-
l ike" flavor. Served with Raw
Onions and Tomatoes on Greek
Pita Bread. All for only $1.45.
SHISH-KA-BOB SANDWICH .. $1.40
MOUSAKA ... 1.75
PASTITSIO ..' 1.75
DOLMADES 1.75
c SPINACH PIE 1.75
COMBINATION PLATE 3.65
GREEK SALAD ...... .90
w PASTERIES ........5 o

Whensomeone drinks too
much and then drives, it's the silence
that kills. Your silence.
It kills your friends, your
relatives, and people you don't even
know. But they're all people you
could save.
If you knew what to say,
maybe you'd be less quiet. Maybe
fewer people would die.
What you should say is, "I'll
drive you home." Or, "Let me call a,
Cab." Or, "Sleep on my couch
tonight."

coffee never made anyone sober.
Maybe it would keep him awake
long enough to have an accident'
But that's about all.
The best way to prevent a
drunk from becoming a dead drunk
is to stop him from driving.
Speak up. Don't let silence be
'the last sound he hears.

- --------------,
j)DRUNKDRIVERIDEPT. Y A-1
1 BOX 2345
I ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852

Don't hsitat Iv caui se VOLI-i

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