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April 17, 1976 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-17

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Saturday, April 11,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY- TRAVEL SUPPLEMEN I

Page i hree

Saturday. AiriI 17, THE MICHIGAN DAILY - TRAVEL SUPPLEMEN I Page lhree

-Z6. ,

AYH
Inore than
hostels
By LAURIE YOUNG
If you like the outdoors,
American Youth Hostels has a
great deal to offer you. Whe-
ther you want to stay in Ann
Arbor or travel around the
United States or Europe, AYH
sponsors a variety of activities
ranging from bicycling to down-
hill skiing.
American Youth Hostels is a
non-profit organization which
offers people of all ages low-
cost-outdoor recreation and hos-
tel travel. A hostel is a low
cost place where you can throw
down your sleeping bag and
cook a meal in return for keep-
ing the hostel clean. It is not
a motel, and bikers and hitch-
hikers are particularly encour-
aged. Drivers are urged to use
the hostel as a home base for
other activities.
The Ann Arbor Area AYHI
chapter spOnsors a variety of
bicyclin, canoeing hiking, and
backpacking trips in the area.
The Detroit chapter offers sail-
ing as well. In winter they em-
phasize cross-country and down-
hill skiing.
Throughout the warm sea-
son, the Ann Arbor chapter or-
ganizes tri-weekly bicycle
rides. The rides are classified
in four categories from "no-
vice" rider to "expert" rider
to enable people to choose a
ride which will best suit their
desired pace. The rides differ
in length, frequency of rest
stops and difficulty of terrain.
A breakfast ride, which usually
starts between 7:30 A. M. and
8:00 A. M., is 15-35 miles long.
Riders stop for breakfast at a
restaurant midway through the
ride. Other rides can vary be-
tween 55 miles and 90 miles
long.
There will be a mass meeting
for the Ann Arbor chapter on
May 10 at 7:30 P. M. at the
AYH office in the International
Center. They will discuss com-
ing events as well as review
activities of past seasons and
introduce new friends to AYH.
If you are interested in partici-
pating in events or' becoming
a group leader, please come!
Everyone is welcome.
There are nine different hos-
tels in Michigan - including
two in the upper Peninsula and
two in the Detroit area. While
you do not have to be a mem-
ber of AYH to stay at a hostel
(though, it is greatly encourag-
ed), members pay between
$1.50 and $4.00 per night. AYH
membership (cards) are wel-
come at any hostel all over the
world.
National AYH sponsors a va-
riety of hiking and bicycling
trips all over the United States,
Canada and Europe. The trips
vary in length and cost, and are
usually limited to 7-10 people.
For further information about
AYH activities and member-
ship, contact Lois Jacob, Presi-
dent of Ann Arbor Area AYH,
at 663-6282 or Reuben Chapman,
bicycling chairperson, at 761-
2274.

Breeze to

By JEFF EPSTEIN
What is only 300 miles, yet,
worlds apart from the city of
Detroit? Chicago. And, while the
Windy City hasn't joined the
ranks of international cosmopoli-
tan cities, it is certainly an ur-
ban oasis in the vast Midwest-
ern desert.
What is especially noteworthy
about Chicago to travelers from
the Detroit area is that Chica-
goans actually enjoy their city.
And, the city's entertainment
and amusement facilities actu-
ally attract people.
Unquestionably, C h i c a g o
strains under the inevitable sec-
ond city comparisons to New
York. But lately, natives are

quick to ad
ley's Doma
the museur
tions, "excit
so has half t
and problem
tantly for th
expense.
The follow
ed to be he
are thinkinE
day jaunt to
the World o
WHAT TO1
The first
without hesi
to the near
pick up your
to find out1

Chicago for
[mit that while Da- ing on. "Chicago" functions as a
in might have half bulletin board magazine, and is
ns, cultural attrac- the definitive source of coming
tement," etc., it al- attractions, cultural events, and
:he people, pollution, freebies. Study your "Chicago"
is. And, most impor- calendar carefully, and you'll
he traveler, half the know more than any native.
Highlights have to include the
ving guide is intend- Art Institute of Chicago, the Mu-
lpful for those who seum of Contemporary Art, and
g of making a 2-3 the tour of the Mercantile Ex-
the Hog Butcher of change. The Museum of Science
n a modest budget. and Industry is enthralling to a
DO thirteen year old, but a bit te-
move you make, tedious if you're older.
tation, is to run out WHERE TO STAY
est newstand and How should I know? I live
copy of "Chicago," there. But, in the reference sec-
exactly what is go- tion of the UGLI, is a standard

whiriw

Stop, searching- for

directory of Hotels and Motels,
which lists most every type of
accommodation in the city, in-
cluding the address, phone, and
price. A most important consid-
eration is the location of the ho-
tel. Basically, your room should
be within walking distance to.
the Rush St./Oak St. hot spot
district, but to figure out your
location a bit of geography is
helpful. (The Rush/Oak area is
1000 North, and 100 East. Mi-
chigan Ave. is 200 East. Center
point is the State St./Madison
Ave. intersection.)
DO NOT MISS
Second City. A comedy troupe,
Second City has been the start-
ing point for many funny and
famous comedians, including
David Steinberg, Robert Klein,
Alan Arkin, and some of the
Not - Ready - For - Prime -
Time-Players. If you call ahead
you might find that there will be
improvisation sessions after the
regular show, which are often
free, and often funnier than the
show.
The Water Tower Place-John
Hancock Building-Michigan Ave.
-According to retailers, the
Magnificent Mile is every bit of
New York's Park Ave. but more
convenient. The Water Tower
Place is an architectural bore
from the outside, but the main
entrance leads you into a tree-
filled atrium flanked by a Lord
& Taylor's and a Marshall
Field's. The rest of the eight
floors include shops, etc. Rather
than pay an exorbitant fee to
look out over the city from the
top of the Hancock Center, I
suggest that you journey up one
less story to the Ninety-Fifth
Restaurant, where for almost
the same price, you'll receive

ind tr4
the same view, but over a drink
in the cocktail lounge..
WHERE TO EAT
Assuming you're travelling
under the confines of a budget,
Chicago still has a wealth of
reasonably priced, casual res-
taurants that serve a solid meal.
"Chicago" magazine lists many
of the places that are worthy of
attention, but here are a few
that are favorites:
Pizzeria Dues-Chicago style
pizza is the best; it is actually
worthy of a meal, and Dues is
the originator of the recipe.
R. J. Grunts-the flagship res-
taurant of the Lettuce Entertain
You organization, is so popular
that you should be prepared to
wait a long time, especially on
a weekend night. Therefore, it
is recommended that you eat at
RJ's for lunch. During the sum-
mer, the salad bar is an incred-
ible display of greens, hor d'
orves and fresh fruit. The Chi-
cago Claim Co.-Nothing more
than good hamburgers, and oth-
er trimmings at a nice price.
The Blackhawk on Pearson-
For a bit fancier meal, the
Blackhawk's specialty is Prime
Rib and steaks, but the schrod
is the best. Solid salad bar with
every type of relish, and a great
hot fudge sundae.
HOW TO GET AROUND
There is something called the
Chicago Transit Authority that
runs busses, els, and a subway
line, but to figure out how to
use them you're going to need a
map. However, as an incentive
to use the CTA, be warned the
parking tickets are $10 and $20
apiece, depending on the of-
fense. There is ample, though
expensive, p r i v a t e parking
spaces in the city.

a tr

I

Going up. . .
A group from Wilderness Outfitters begins the first
approach on peak ascent to the Wind River Mountains
in Wyoming last summer.

Travel Guides in Review
Edited by Ellen Kolovos
Reviews by Lynn Gumpert and
Michael Privitera
University of Michigan Press,
1975.
By DAN BLUGERMAN
Travelling requires planning.
And while talking with the more
experienced is invaluable, there
is no way you can avoid the
need to search out avcouple
books full of travel information.
It's hard to find a bookstore
without travel guides and equal-
ly hard to know which books
contain the exact information
you need for planning your trip.
"Suit Your Spirit" by the in-
formed staff of the International
Center at the 'U' can help you
find those secrets to the cheap-
est air travel or suggest a com-
prehensive guide to hitch hiking
in South America. It reviews on-
ly 88 of the thousands of travel
guides, but can prove a valuable
resource to the student traveller
as their selections fall into three
groups: student or low-budget
oriented; "classic" or well
known; or inclusive or geogra-
phic areas not generally cover-
ed.
The structured, one-page re-

avei gu
views evaluate the usefulness'
of the information and spell out
who the books can help the
most.
This is the kind of work you
will be tempted to fully exploit
while standing in the bookstore
aisle. All books are indexed by
geographic area, alphabetical
order and mode of transporta-
tion for quick reference. If you
use it to locate a book, and it is
posible you wouldn't have found
it without this source, purchase
a copy of "Suit Your Spirit" to
insure successive annual revi-
sions. There have been 1974 and
1975 editions, but if everyone
gets wise and nobody buys it, at
some point the university will
refuse to publish the updates.
Also, the money saved by avoid-
ing useless information could
easily be more than the $3.95
this reviewer paid for it.
Only a few of the critiques are
negative, but this appears to be
a function of selection. The au-
thors want to direct people to
the better travel guides rather
than engage in repetitive di-
gressions about the lesser works
on the subject.
This work shows its usefulness
in the EVALUATION of "Trav-

ellers Guide to Southern Afr
ca." "It is unfortunate that, th
book does not live up to a tra
eller's expectations. Although
might be good for light, la
night reading, it is not recon
mended as an outstanding gui
or an inclusive commentar
Unfortunately, more informatic
does not exist and for the m
ment one must depend on su
superficial commentaries as th
one."
In the 'Plane' section of tt
mode of travel index there
listed only one title: "Air Trav
Bargains". The EVALUATIO
tells why.
"At first glance, the volum
of information appears ove
whelming. Locating inexpensi
air rates involves precious tin
spent in research as well as
certain amount of luck. The
are the hidden costs of low a
fares. But the bargain inform
tion is all here for those willir
to dig for it."
Publisher, date, number
pages and price are includ
for all reviewed books. A list
volumes in series is found
the back of the book. At lea
one selection from each seri
is reviewed.

ide

*i-
'is
IV-
it
te
mn-
de
y.
on
o-
ch
is
he
is
el
N
ne
r-
ve
ne
a
se
air
a-

Bring This

22 YEAR OLDS!.

a-
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of
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of On The Largest Selection Of I
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is only half the fun
Grace Young attempts her first rapell down a barren
cliff of the Wind River Mountains.

BOERSMA TRAVEL

The Province of Varmland,
in the western part of Sweden,
claims to be Europe's number
one canoe region. This could be
true-the area is spangled with
thousands of lakes, islands and
water labyrinths. If you're in-
terested in paddling, you can
rent a canoe from outfittters in
one of Varmland's four major
canoeing centers (the largest
is Arjang) and head out into

beautiful wild country. Canoes
can be rented for seven days
and nights, including provisions,
for about $35 per person for
groups of ten (other arrange-
ments can be made for groups
of varying sizes.) For a list of
owedish canoeing possibilities,
write the Swedish National
Tourist Office, 75 Rockefeller
Plaza, NYC 10019 - Mademoi-
selle -

I/M

m

puuinu.uUUUUUUUUUE

mm

NNEW

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srsre,.

Hang Gliders 0 Instruction r Service
Eco-Flight and Seagull Gliders
Unique String Kites 0 Model Balsa Gliders

le
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A SURPLUS STORE AND A WHOLE LOT MORE!
IRMY SURPLUS

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ALL BOOTS
(Hiking, Military, Work)
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LARGEST SELECTION OF CHARTERS IN MIDWEST
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EUROPEAN CHARTERS
Advance Book Charters &
Travel Group Centers
10 Days to 9 Months Duration
from $259
Advance purchase required of
30 to 60 days. As little as 10%
deposit holds your reserva-
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Toronto to London, Manches-
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Chicago, Montreal, New York,
washington, D.C. & Boston
departures available (Eurail.

TORONTO
DEPARTS ANY
SPRING WEEKEND
from $39.50
Price includes round trip rail
transportation, accommoda-
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SEASONS SHERATON HO-
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taxes & gratuities.
WEEKDAY TORONTO

BUCK & GERBER KNIVES

BROOKS CYCLE JACKETS

CAMP TRAILS SILVA COMPASSES
UNIVERSAL PACKS COLEMAN

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OPTIMUS STOVES

CB RADIOS

DEXTER HIKING BOOTS

LEVI

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*Ai programs include round
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201 E. Washington

I

U

- F -~ I

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