100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday,,.Jonuary 151"1'976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

PLO PARTICIPATION ATTACKED

Israel threatens Geneva boycott,

By AP and UPI
Israel threatened yesterday to "reconsider its commitment"
to the Geneva peace talks as Arab nations readied a proposal
to ask the U. N. Security Council to add Palestinian "national
rights" to the framework for a Mideast peace.
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon, speaking to the Israeli parlia-
ment in Jerusalem, warned that any changes in Security Council
resolutiops on the Mideast could lead to "paralysis, if not to
the abolition" of the Geneva conference.
THE GENEVA conference was convened after the October
1973 Mideast war, with the United States and the Soviet Union
as co-sponsors. It met once, then recessed to await Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger's personal diplomacy.
Arab countries want the Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO) invited to the next Geneva session, but Israel refuses to
egotiate with the guerrilla organization and is boycotting the
urrent Security Council session because the PLO was invited
to Participate.

Allon said "the Palestinian problem must not be ignored, butE
the PLO does not represent any people and is not fit for nego-
tiations on any subject."
AT THE UNITED NATIONS in New York, Arab delegates
said they had agreed in principle on a resolution to put before
the Security Council calling for Israeli withdrawal from all oc-
cupied Arab territory and recognition of the "inalienable na-
tional rights" of the Palestinians as the basis for any peace set-
tlement.
Meanwhile, in a further escalation of the Lebanese -civil war
yesterday, Christian forces captured a Palestinian refugee camp
and Moslems retaliated by attacking downtown Beirut with
mortars and machine guns in a drive to cut the burning capital
in two.
Fierce fighting raged across the country and throughout the
capital's deserted streets. The Associated Press reported 169
killed and 310 wounded, while other news services reported lower
figures. This raises the estimated toll for nine months of civil
war to nearly 8,500 dead and 18,100 wounded.
CHRISTIAN FORCES backed by armored cars and mortar
fire seized the Palestinian camp of Ibayeh 10 miles north of
Beirut on the coast at dawn today after laying siege to it for
five days, witnesses said. A spokesman for the Christian Phalan-
gist party hailed it as a "major victory."
In other Mideast developments, France said yesterday a
number of European countries planned to offer prposals in the
future for guaranteeing a Mideast peace settlement.
French Ambassador Louis de Guiringaud, first of the per-
manent members of the Security Council to speak on concrete
issues of the Mideast question in the council debate, which began
on Monday, also called for genuine negotiations among the
parties.
"TODAY, EVERY MEMBER senses that without taking into
account the Palestinian problem there can be no settlement which
is truly just and durable," he said.
Japan called yesterday for talks between Israel and the
Palestine Liberation Organization, which Israel has described as
an unrepresentative terrorist group.
The position, outlined by Ambassador Shizuo Saito in the
Security Council debate on the Mideast seemed to be a shift from
the stand Japan took in the General Assembly last year.
X-RATED PUPPETS?
not exactly, but it is adult puppetry
An "This is no
outstanding Y kiddy show,
event, this is
beautiful elaborate
andadl
captivating." theatre."
-Univ.of --Jackson
Nebraska t Daily News

JFK's lover exposes
their secret romance
(Continued from Page 1) revealed, it was time to tell all.
which he estimated would begin "I THINK it was the empti-
appearing in the National En- ness of the pocket," he said,
quirer in about three months. adding that she had no money
"She's a 1 o v e r, she's a apart from a first payment sent
writer," he added. to her last night. He would not
Meredith said he did not ex- give the value of this payment.
pect the book to have any so- Meredith said she was now
cial redeeming value but Exner living in a mobile home in Cali-
had decided that because parts fornia with her golf-pro husband.
of the affair already had been "She is living very nervous-
_ -ly, very nervously, about the
NEW FIND revelations in this book. She
may know things she isn't aware
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina- she knows . . . she is terrified
(UPI)-New gold and copper de- for her life," Meredith said.
posits have been discovered in
Catamarca Province in north-,
west Argentina, Economy Mini-
ster Antonio Cafiero announced. ENJOY THE FINE
Cafiera said the government
is investing the equivalent of WEST OF NE
$393,000 in developing the La EAST OF SA
Alumbrera field. He said esti-
mates show about one million IN A QUIET ELE
tons of copper and a small LUNCH " DINNER 0
amount of gold is present in the
area.
a ~FOUI
Theatre Phone 662-6264.;,E.,
SEAA
TONIGHT AT 7 &9H
OPEN 6:45 THE RESTAURANT IN
Paramount Pictures Presents
4905 WASHTENAW, A
JUST WEST OF GO

-TONIGHT-
MALCOLM MacDOWELL in Lindsay Anderson's
0 LUCKY MAN!
(1 973)
in AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
at 6:30 & 9:30-$1.25
Pick up one of our January film schedules
at the show

1

I



ST CH I N ESE FOOD
EW YORK AND
N FRANCISCO
EGANT SETTING
SNACKS 0 COCKTAILS

i
" q Ilu ll OIII Nllllld
muplllil1 11 p0l llllllli
u min n ll i fl l ll ) , I ldi d
nl Illlimmmm
""p uui dl IIIIIIIINIIII

AP Photo-
THIS IS THE TASER, a futuristic weapon which fires
electrified darts at its victims. The gun has been used in
several crimes, and Pennsylvania police reported Tuesday
that one had been used to torture a couple during a robbery.
'ser used in crime
as well as defense

ANN ARBOR-Prepare yourself for the RETURN INVASION of
PROCTOR & BERGMAN
(Of the FIRESIGN THEATRE)
PLUS ALSO
APPEARING:
Ann Arbor's
Fores. own comedy
specialists
Theatre .rThe
Movie Professionals
SUNDAY, JANUARY 18th & Monday, JANUARY 19th
MATRIX THEATRE,
603 E. William
TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY AT 7 & 9:30 p.m.
TICKETS $2.50 available in advance For further info: 994-0627
ante

VAC., etc. proudly presents-

DAVID SYROTIAK'S
NATIONAL
MARIONETTE THEATRE

reat to allow it to be sold, '
anufactured or imported into
anada," said Canadian Justice
Winister Ron Basford, in an-
nouncing the decision to ban the
raser.
In Blue Bell, Pa., Police Sgt.
Joseph Stemple said Tuesday
hat four men had used the
eapon to terrorize a man and
is wife into revealing where
hey kept their money and valu-
bles.
,STEMPLE SAID that the as-
ailants tied up the couple,
hose names the would not re-
veal and then shot them with
he ,Taser.
The shock from the weapon
auses muscles to contract, in-
apacitating the victim for up
o a minute.
The barbs are charged with
,000 volts of electricity. They
an penetrate clothing, and the
lectrical charge is more than
fficient to jump from the
othing to the body. The weap-
is sold for $199.50.
COVER TOLD the product
fey Commission representa-
yes that he saw little likeli-
d that the Taser would come
to wide use by. criminals, be-
use its range is only 15 feet
nd it only holds two cartridges,
ach containing two simultane-
usly-fired barbs.
HAIRSTYLING
TO PLEASE
LONG OR SHORT
DASCOLA
Hair Stylists
Arborlnd-971-9975
E. University-662-0354
E. Liberty-668-9329
Maple Viiiaae-761-2733
Campus Chapel
invites the public to
a workshop in three sessions
"Cadillacs or
Communes:
Choosing a Lifestyle"
Lifestvie considerations in
light of World Poverty
Thursdays,
Jan. 15, 22, 29
7:30 P.M.
Jan. 15-"Bevond the Next
Harvest" CROP Film

He also said he had received
no reports of fatalities or ser-
ious injuries being caused by
the 3,000 Tasers his company
has sold in the nearly one year
it has marketed the product.
Frank Pipkin, director of the
commission's product detect op-
erations division, said that if
the device is found to be haz-
ardous, the commission could
ban it.

THURS., JAN. 29

8 P.M.

MEN DELSSOHN
A special children's show Wed., Jan. 28, 1 p.m.
TICKETS: Adults-$2.50; Children-$1.25
* Available at the Michioan Union, Jan. 15
For more info, call 763-1107

people who can.

Mon., tan. 26 & Tues., Jan. 21

E
i{ (
I
4
j#
{
f
E

Hill Auditorium at 8:00 p.m.
16.00 $5.001 4.00 "mail order only~

.w. .r

Write in the opproprate box below the amount of tickets you wish. imit of 8 per .nvelape.
$6.00 $6.00 $5.00 $4.00
center 8 rows
Main Floor First Balcony First Balc. Second Balc. Value
Mon., Jan. 26 $
Tues., Jan. 27$

Enclosed is my certified check or money order payable to
UAC Concerts in the amount of

$

(Sony, w. cannot cpt prsonl th.;ks or csh}.
fe certain that you have marked the number of tickets you are ordering in the correct box for the date(s)
and price(s) you wish.

Send your mail order to:
UAC Concerts, Michigan Union, 530 S. State, Ann Arbor, Mi. 48104.
Important-
I I have enclosed a self-addressed stamped envelope. Please
mail my tickets to me.
0 I have not enclosed a return envelope. Please hold my
tickets for pickup at the Box Office in the Michigan Union
lobby beginning Wednesday, Jan. 21.
UAC/Michigan Box Office 11:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 103.2

01

I

I

i

I

I

;...,x , r n ' .:x.. . 7..\y _ _r::.. " ., ..._ .,..' .. ". ' " . ... . .. . ., :.>rr?.. :

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan