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April 16, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-16

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, Apri1,16, 1976

PagIIIIIeG Ten THE-- . | MICHIGAN| D||gi |||g ig||||LY||| |Friiday,| | || |||April |16, 1976m na ggg gi .-

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III

123
Anr
313

baobab
folk art gallery
W. Washington GALLERY HOURS
n Arbor, Michigan Tuesday-Friday
3-662-3681 12-9
Saturday
10-6
Jewery

,_
fI
I
I
w
t
I

PINBALL,
BOWLING,
BILLIARDS and
FOOSBALL
TILL 1 A.M. TON ITE
at the UNION

(Continued from Page 1)
Arbor architect, which praised
the two gyms as "a building of
significant architectural value-
on the exterior for its important
visual presence, and on the :n-
teror for its magnificent lum-
inous volume."
Shepherd presented five sug-
gestions for possible use of the
building; as an alumni center
OLSOLIDATED
C<mERR CEnTRES
a

and other distinctive
gifts from distant
culturesI

We'll he here
during and after
exams and break
UM Stylists
at the
union. Chet, Harold
and Dave
READ and USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Group wants Waterman Gym saved

1A

III

1520 E. Green Champaign,I

111 618201

i

a center for study and library
use ("I understand the Under-
graduate Library is getting very
crowded these days," he said), a
museum annex, a complex of
classrooms, meeting centers and
activity areas, and a place
where limited athletic activities
(such as dancing) could take
place
The Regents also heard public
discussion over the ever-recur-
ring question of recombinant
DNA research. Several persons
rose to criticize the Committee
B report of March 7, which
favored the establishment of
DNA research at the University.
Tenants
rights
bill OK'd
(Continued from Page 1)
due, only to discover that the
tenant still lives there.
Landlords and tenants alike
seem to agree that the bill de-
serves passage and Paul Emery
of Bullard's office gives it "a
pretty good chance" of clearing
the Senate.
Emery added, however, that
another Bullard bill which seeks
to provide a legal apparatus for
arbitration in rent strikes will
be "a tougher nut to crack."
"There's not much chance off
passage until tenants pull off
some successful strikes," he
said. "That bill will probably
take another session."

atomic fission and fusion bombs,
both in lack of community con-
trol and in the large number of
possible dangers involved.
Prof. Kenryk Skoliniowski was
especially angered by the Com-
mittee B report, calling it "a
shamble of unwarranted assump-
tions, half-baked reasoning and
hasty conclusions."

I

Four other University profes- the current mandatory funding
sors championed the report, re- program in last week's election.
peating their assurances that "As a representative body,"
safety procedures would be rig- said Luker, "we consider that

dent Calvin Luker appeared be-
fore the Regents to acquaint
them with the results of last
week's MSA elections. Luker
outlined the problems MSA
faces now that mandatory fund-
ing has been abolished.
Students voted to discontinue

In other action, Michigan Stu- former, was born in Adams,
dent Assembly (MSA) Presi- Mass., in 1820 and died in 1906.

Several of the critics expressedf orous and that the danger of vote binding."
their disappointment in the "monster bacteria" would be Luker promised to present a
Committee's failure to seek in- "exceedingly small." proposal for an alternative fund-
put from the non-University ing system at the May meeting,
community. "I BELIEVE this technology and the Regents agreel to study
promises great benefits," said it at that time.
THE RESEARCH was twice William Folk, assistant profes-
compared to the early work on sor of Biological Chemistry. Susan Anthony, a social re-

She was an active temperance
a d v o c a t e, abolitionist and
proponent of Negr'o suffrage,
but was best known for her
struggle to attain suffrage for
women.
The first inhabitants of Mis-
sissippi were the Natchez,
Choctaw and Chicksaw In-
dians.

Textile art from three continents - South American an-
tiquities - Contemporary and traditional African sculpture
- Jewelry fashioned from imported beads and silver -
Afghani Ruas - Hand-Carved gourd boxes from Peru -
Basketry.

For guaranteed lowest ..
prices -shipped within
48 hours - call us.
CANON - RICOH
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MINOLTA - NIKON
HONEYWELL
KONICA - KOWA

CBS pres. defends Schorr
for release of CIA report

Your Discontinued Textbooks

VIVITAR - BRAUN «
PENTAX -' AGFA
TAMRON - TIFFEN
ASANUMA - HOYA
CIBACHROME
POLAROID
OMEGA - GOSSEN s
SEKONIC - KODAK
RODENSTOCK - ELMO w
HANSA - LINHOLF
MANY-
MANY MORE

(Continued from Page 1)
gather information."
Salant also defended CBS
Chairman William Paley, who
has been accused of permitting
the CIA recruitment of network
personnel.
Paley has also come under
attack for allegedly dominating
the programming of CBS news.
HE DENIED that Paley has
tried to influence the opera-
tions of his news department.
Instead, he said, the chair-
man's primary role was to see
that the news department con-

tinued to be funded.
"Only members of the news
department are able to see pro-
grams before they are broad-
cast," Salant added.
However, Salant admitted
there are some problems with
television news coverage.
"M O S T O F the valid
criticism leveled at us arises
because of our constraints in
time," Salant said. "One of the
oldest questions we're faced
with is how to decide what to
put on the air."
He explained that expanding

If sold to Ulrich's WITH your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST DEAL -FIGURE IT OUT
Ulrich's sells your discontinued books to
over 600 college bookstores. This way we
get the highest possible prices for YOU.
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the network news to an hour
is difficult because of the
FCC's prime-time access law.
The law restricts the networks
from providing local stations
with programming between 7
and 8 p.m., the most likely
time-slot for expanded news
Noting that surveys show
television as the number one
source of news for most Amer-
icans, Salant downgraded the
effect of TV in affecting elec-
tion results.
"I DON'T think we made or
broke Muskie, McGovern or
Nixon," he said. "We aren't
going to make Jimmy Carter
president."
Political pressures have eas-
ed under the Ford administra-
tion, Salant said. Each Presi-
dent has tried to control the
media to some degree but he
called the Ford White House
the easiest to get along with
since before the Roosevelt ad-
ministration.
Salant agreed with criticism
leveled against the media's un-
even coverage of world events.
Noting that some areas, such
as the Mideast tend to receive
heavy coverage, while other
areas, Africa and South Ameri-
ca particularly, receive little
to no coverage. Salant explain-
ed that the difficulty often lies
in the problems of getting to
information and then getting a
story out of the country.
Another problem, he added is
that journalists tend to "follow
the pack." He added that CBS
is planning to open new bu-
reaus around the world during
the next year.

Call Toll-Free
Anytime=
1-800-322-4400
ILLINOIS ONLY
On1SOLIDATED
CArMERA CETRES

{:

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Uv ersity
ofMichigan
S c h o o l o f A rte
Summer
Program,
Spring Half Term - May 3 through June 26
Prerequisite for all courses is satisfactory completion of the basic pro-
gram, equivalent work done elsewhere or permission of instructor.
Courses meet five days per week, instruction and critiques take place
three days per week.

Summer Workshops - June 28 through July 12
These intensive workshops are made available on a non-credit basis for
those who can take advantage of concentrated work in fields charac-
terized by substantial technical demands. The two-week period is
scheduled for June 28 through July 12th. While no specific prerequi-
sites are required, students should have sufficient prior experience or
knowledge of the field to fully participate in studio work. Classes will
meet for four hours each day, five days per week The studios will be
available for the remainder of the time to permit students to wnrk inde-
pendently.
VIDEO WORKSHOP
FILM ANIMATION WORKSHOP
FABRIC PRINTING WORKSHOP
PHOTO SERIGRAPHY WORKSHOP
METALSMITHING WORKSHOP
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
CERAMICS WORKSHOP
FIGURE PAINTING WORKSHOP
BR.DNZE CASTING WORKSHOP
SENSITOMETRY WORKSHOP
Fees and Admission
Total prise per workshop s
'The workshop regqstration c oupun beuow should be con.pleted and re-
turned with a deposit of $50 00 for each workshop elected Checks
should be made payable to "School of Art. University of Michigan The
fee for a workshop course is refundable, upon presentation of valid
reason, prior to May 15th but are non-refundable thereafter Sufficient
registrations must be received by June 1st to permit the operation of
each workshop or applicants wil be informed and their deposits re-
turned Class activities in each irea wil require an expense for ex-
pendable supplies. Normally. basic needs for workshop courses wi lbe
met by a lab fee of less than $20 00. but this amouni may vary, de-
pending on the extent of the student s maternai requirenents. No re-
funds are permitted after the beginning of workshop classes
Attach deposit of $50 00 for each workshop ':eced aenw mito:

ROCK
Grateful Dead
Curtis Mayfield
Bette Midler
Eric Clapton
J. Geils Band
Sha Na Na
Three Dog Night
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

JAZZ
Yusef Lateef
Jimmy Witherspoon
Dave Brubeck
Ramsey Lewis
Miles Davis
Duke Ellington
John Coltrane
Cannonball Adderley

CLASSICAL
Maurice Abravanel, Utah
Symphony
William Steinberg, Pittsburgh
Symphony
Maurice Andre
Alfred Brendel
Andres Segovia
London Symphony Orchestra
Sylvia Marlowe
BEETHOVEN:
NINE SYMPHONIES - Complete
William Steinberg
conducts Pittsburgh
Symphony $14.98
Seven record set

BLUES - FOLK
Brownie McGhee
Lightnin' Hopkins
Doc Watson
Buffy Sainte Marie
Otis Spann
Jimmy Rushihg
Joan Baez
John Lee Hooker
HANDEL:
MESSIAH - Complete
Sir Adrian Boult and
the London
Philharmonic
Choir and
Orchestra $6.98
Three record set
JULIAN BREAM:
THE CLASSICAL GUITAR
Works of Bach,
De Falla, Villa

LABELS
Sine Qua Non
Westminster Gold
RCA
Vanguard
Columbia
Elektra
Philips
Turnabout
Atlantic
and many others
BRAHMS:
COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
Featuring Sir Adrian
Boult, the London
Philharmonic;
Leopold Stokowski,
Houston Symphony,
William Steinberg,
Pittsburgh
Symphony $8.98
Four record set
THE BAROQUE TRUMPET

PHOTOGRAPHY
CINEMATOGRAPHY

CERAMICS
PAINTING

LIFE DRAWING
WEAVING & FABRIC DESIGN
ILLUSTRATION
PRINTMAKING (LITHOGRAPHY)
Fees and Admission
Those interested in credit work in the spring half term must be admitted
to the University. Application materials should be secured from the Of-
fice of Admission, 1220 Student Activities Building, The University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Special problems regarding pre-
requisites are best referred to the Office of the Dean, School of Art -
(313) 764-0397.
Fees for credit courses in 1975-76 are based on the following schedule:

SUMMER PROGRAM
OFFICE OF THE DEAN
SCHOOL OF ART
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ANN APPOR MIGHIGAN 48109
Requests for additionaulmination should be directed to:
Office of the Dean
School of Art
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
(313) 764-0397
NON-CREDIT WORKSHOP REGISTRATION
(Deadline for Receipt - June 1, 1976)
s .
* s
- M
NAME
(Please priit cleary)
ADDRESS
zip code -
TELEPHONE

BEST OF STRAUSS
- Beloved Waltzes,
Polkas and
Overtures -
Eduard Strauss and
his orchestra $6.98
Three record set
THE BEST OF
* n'.1 end

VIRGIL FOX:
IN CONCERT
The organist of the
70's performs Bach
$.98
Three record set
Ii i3

Five or more credits elected:
lower division students
upper division students

Michigan Resident
$212
240

Non-Re
$6
7

sident
89
42

,

C= ...nr thin {iio rrPriitC Plprtorl-

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