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April 14, 1976 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1976-04-14

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Wednesday, April 14, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, April 14, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Anti-Israelis emerge

Daily Official Bulletin

victorious in

elections

By A and Reiter
JERUSALEM - Anti - Israeli
candidates ranging froni Arab
guerrilla supporters to Palestin-
ian nationalists and Communists
were the clear winners yester-
day in municipal elections in
the riot - torn occupied West
Bank.
But Defense Minister Shimon
Peres said although many of the
winners openly opposed Israeli
military rule, "Israel won a con-
siderable victory. . . . We held
clear elections and this is the
first time in Arab society as far
as I know that elections were
held in perfect order and quiet,
without protests."
"ISRAEL WAS not a side in
the elections," Peres added in
a state radio interview. "We
did not put forth a platform, and
we did not put forward candi-
dates. . . The future of (the
West Bank) was not up for de-
cision."
The independent Israeli news-
paper Yediot Aharonot called
the vote a "disaster" and criti-
cized Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin's government for permit-
ting the elections to take place
in an atmosphere poisoned by
recent riots.
Anti-Israeli action by the ne*-
comers, no matter what, their
allegiances, is bound to be lim-
ited by the need to cooperate
with Israel on town affairs such
as water, electricity and financ-
ing. And the Israeli occupiers,
who had anticipated nationalist
gains, clearly felt they could
work with the new councils.
FINAL RESULTS from Mon-
day's elections in 24 West Bank
towns confirmed that most mod-
erate Arab leaders were beaten
by the anti-Israelis, including
supporters of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization.
In Hebron, PLO sympathizers
led by a Cairo-trained farm ex-
pert, Fahad Kawasme, took all
seats on the council, ending over
CORRECTION
Sunday's story on Alabama
Gov. George Wallace's Detroit
appearance may have left an
incorrect impression of his stand
on welfare and environmental
protection. We reported that
Wallace is opposed to both of
these, but campaign officials
point out that the Alabama gov-
ernor is only opposed to the'
"welfare abuses" which occur
under the present system, and
is against closing factories in
the name of environmental pro-
tection.

three decades of rule by
highly conservative Sheikh
hammed Ali Jaabar. "This
new era for the people of
town," Kawasme said.

the
Mo-.
is a
this

Many old ruling clans and
supporters of Jordan's King
Hussein, who ruled the West
Bank until Israeli captured it in
the 1967 Mideast war, were de-1
feated in the vote.
IN THE riot centers of Nah-
lus, Beit Sahur, and El-Bira,
entire new town councils were
elected.
"The election has strengthen-
ed the PLO.in the West Bank,"
proclaimed Karim Khalaf, who
defeated the Israelis by cam-
paigning openly for the PLO
and was re-elected mayor of
Ramallah. "We are not repre-
sentatives of the PLO-the PLO
represent us," he said.
The re-elected mayor of Beth-
lehem, Elias Freij, said, "The
Israelis should not behave like
an ostrich-they should now rec-
ognize the feelings of the West
Bank people and their support
of the PLO."
FREIJ WAS one of the few
moderates to retain his office
in the election, but his appeal
for Israel to face the PLO-now
banned as a terror organization
-underlined restive feelings in
the West Bank, where Arab
riots have flared against the
Israeli occupation.
No incidents were reported
Monday as 72.3 per cent of the
88,000 eligible voters took part

in the elections for new Arab
mayors and town councils.
Women were given the vote'
for the first time by the Israeli
occupation authorities and 22,009
of them voted, but none of three
women among 514 candidates
was elected.
WITH POLITICAL parties out-
lawed on the West Bank, the
exact affiliations of many of the
205 winners were unknown. At
least 148 were newcomers, and
most were identified as nation-
alists, underground Communists
or supporters of the PLO.
Nationalists generally a r e
those who see Palestinian Arabs
as a distinct national group.
Some want a free West Bank or
a West Bank as a self-ruling
part of a federation with Syria
or Jordan. Others seek a West
Bank ruled by the PLO or a
larger state including all Pales-
tinians and land that makes up
Israel.
THE MICHIGAN-DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 159
Wednesday, April 14, 19'6
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

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discuss "Defining National Secur- say, Translation Awards, John Si- of Computer Sciences and Psycholo-
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All-orchestral, OR
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BASSETT: "Echo
WEBER: Invitatic
COPLAND: Suite
RAVEL: "La Vals
Begin these spring
cocktail and dinne
cert. Special guests
(Dinner tickets at

Eugene Ormandy Marilyn Horne
and The Philadelphia Orchestra
MAY FESTIVAL tickets are still available for:
ednesday, April 28 Saturday, May 1
(MANDY conducting: ORMANDY conducting; HORNE, soprano soloist:
ony No. 31 ("Hornsignal") BEETHOVEN: Overture to "Coriolanus"
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tickets from $4 to $12
(Thursday and Friday night concerts are sold out)
G"T T 7T T'ri r

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