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April 13, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-13

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Arts & nTHE MICHIGAN DAILY
ArtsEntertainmtTuesday, April . .13.1976 Page F

We
- -m~

Horo wit 6reat at Hill

By JEFFREY SELBST

14), Rachmaninoff (Etude Ta-
bleau no. S op. 39), Liszt (Valse j

THERE are no further joys to oubliee, Au bord d'un source),
be had in this world: I and Chopin (Nocturne E min.,'
have seen Vladimir Horowitz op. posth., Waltz in A min. op.
play the piano. For the old mas- 34 no. 2, Scherzo in B min., op.
ter, this feat consists of effort- 20 no. 1)
less movement, or so it would
seem. He plays as if born to C L E A R L Y his best
the stool; his fingers glide over works were on the second half
the surface of the keys, float- of the program. The Rachma-
ing, swooping, executing a des- ninoff, which opened this part,
perate glissando or a delicate was characterized by harsh,{
appogiatura. To watch Vladimir violent attacks, and ragged,
Horowitz is an experience. crunched chords. For a piece,

f
'

certo without Orchestra, re- we are speaking of one of the
sembled the Rachmaninoff in finest interpreters of Romantic
its sweeping intensity. And piano literature since perhaps
there is no need to talk of these its inception. What is there to
pieces' performances: Horo- say?
witz played them, and he was
brilliant. To thunderous applause, and
Horowitz was most clearsynrepeated yells of bravo, encore
Hoowiemt (asorst clyh and the like, Horowitz returned
his element (insofar as such a to the stoll after his concert
rounded performer can be said had "officially" ended, and'
to have an "element") with his pad tfe dayedelicatd
selection of Chopin. In his per- played the dreamy, delicate
forane o te Emi. pstu-Traumierai by Schumann.
formance of the E mn. posthu- Ehimmering passages, excel-
mous Nocturne, he made the lent tone - what else does one
ornamental work that Chopin need in an encore? Fire, that's
found so obligatory seem or-dr F'
what.

1 had my share of musical of this nature, this amounted'
-a tonir ripor

riches Sunday afternoon at Hill. ganic to tne work as a whoe
Under the auspices of the Uni- In contrast to such bravura and not merely the effete ro-
versity Musical Society, Horo- style, his concert opener, the coc effect that the Polish com-I
witz played (at $15-$10 a throw) Schumann Arabesque, resem- poser intended. And this is not
to a packed crowd of mostly af- bled the Liszt Valse oubilee. a complaint; merely an ap-
fluent types, regaling them Each were light, figured works, praisal. I heard Chopin for whatG
with a recital that included presaging impressionism in seems to me the first time, in
NK Schumann (Arabesque op. 18, their tonal colorations. The oth- Hill Auditorium Sunday after-
Concerto without Orchestra op. er Schumann piece, the Con- noon.;

Daily Photo by KEN Fi

Vladimir Horowitz
Hitchcock

returns with

'Plot'

By CHRIS KOCHMANSKI
A L F R E D HITCHCOCK'S
Family Plot is more pleas-
ant than it is suspenseful, but
its quick, yet relaxed pace and
genuinely witty script are so
well calculated that the film's
rather long 120-minute running
time seems all too short.
This, the 53rd effort in Hitch-
cock's 50-year filmmaking ca-
reer, finds him in a most gen-
ial mood. The Master draws
upon familiar devices (like
missing heirs, kidnappings,
tricky disguises and frantic car
chases), while portraying a
quartet of his most delightfully
perverse, attractive characters.
The end result is altogether sat-
isfying Hitchcock which, sur-
prisingly, is quite unlike any-
thing he's done before.
The "family plot" of the title
is, in fact, two separte dramas
which ultimately converge. One
concerns a fake spiritualist
(Barbara Harris) and her
would - be actor / cab driver
boyfriend (Bruce Dern) who,
for a prospective $10,000 re-
ward, set out to locate the long-
lost heir to a considerable for-
tune.
THE HEIR (William Devane),
unbeknownst to Harris and
Dern, is a successful jeweler
who, along with a reluctant fe-

t
i
«
l!
i,,

male accomplice (K a r e n{
Black), pulls a series of spec-
tacularly profitable kidnappings
on the sidec
The plot's details are all toot
complicated to outline here, but
needless to say, Harris' and
Dern's manhunt eventually (and!
ironically) leads to the trail of1
Devane's dirty work.
The mood of the film is en-
tirely comic; ;even in the mostj

of a faultlessly conceived and
executed heist.
Underlying all the plot me-
chanics is a very real sexual
tension. Dern believes Harris
is obsessed with sex - she
is - and the Devane character
is clearly sexually stimulated
by the successful completion of
a daring kidnapping.
Hitchcock then moves to his
well-trodden theme of disguise.

IF Family Plot has any ma-
jar fault, it is its tendency to
be overly talky at times. And
yet Hitchcock and Lehman'
counterpoint the generally su-
perb dialogue with hime re-
markable action sequences -
notably the systematic kidnap-
ping of a Roman Catholic bish-
op in ceremonial cathedral stir-,
roundings, and a car chase that
reminds one of the breathtaking

THE Waltz in A min. of Cho-3
pin has never been one of my
favorites- I was always stuck,
like a chump, on the C sharp!
minor - but, again, under the
talented fingers of Horowitz,
the piece gained definition, or
perhaps more correctly, rede-
finition.
Oh, enough. This is amount-
ing to hero-worship, notreview.-
The problem is that it almost
seems facetious to review
someone like Vladimir Horo-
witz - to say, "Well, Vlad, you
did us proud" or "Nice work,
kid - now make it pay", well

Which he provided, with his
second encore -- the Moskow-
sky Sparks. The title tells all.
But we demanded more -
Scriabin! Etude in D sharap
minor! Rachmaninoff! Finale
of the Second Sonata! Would we
never let him go?
At last, the concert had to
end, and Horowitz retired from
the stage with his c armingj
smile. Perhaps we in Ann Ar-
bor will be privileged to see this
great man turn an instrument
into a piece of gold again. But
if I never see him again, at
least I've seen him once.
New Mexico became a prov-
ince of Mexico in 1821, the same
year William Becknell estab-
lished the Santa Fe Trail.
Col. Kit Carson defeated the
Mescalero-Apache and Navaho
Indians in 1853.

Why not join the DAILY ?
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Cone on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
The Oyster Bar&
Th pget OPEN FOR LUNCH
Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday
12:00 noon-1 :30 p.m.
SALAD BAR $.... .......... 2.50
served with bread and butter
SPAGHETTI with MEAT or MUSHROOMS
or WHITE CLAM SAUCE. .........$1.95
served with bread and butter and small salad bowl
OPEN FACE PROSCUITTO HAM and
JALSBERG CHEESE SANDWICH ...... $1.95
CROCK OF SOUP DU JOUR
AND SALAD BOWL (small) .........$1.95
bread sticks
VEAL FRANCAISE................$2.95
veal tenderloin saute in butter with parsley, garlic and
lemon, served with spaghetti and tomato sauce, small
salad bowl and bread and butter
SHRIMP MARIA........ .......$.. 3.25
cooked in butter with mushrooms, scallions, sherry,
sauce, served with small salad bowl, spaghetti with
tomato sauce, bread and butter
SCALLOPS MARIA ................ $3.25
cooked same as shrimp with same service
POACHED FISH IN
CHAMPAGNE SAUCE .............. $2.95
please ask your waitress for daily fish-served with
small salad bowl, bread and butter and spaghetti With
tomato sauce
OMETLETTE MAISON..............$2.95
a three egg omelette with mushrooms, Jalsberg cheese,
tomatoes leek, onions, wine, served wth bread and
butter
LOW CALORIE VEGETABLE PLATE ... $2.95
assortment of FRESH vegetables saute in a drop of
olive oil, chablis and light spices, tapped with Jlalsberg
cheese, served with bread sticks and small salad bowl
COQ AU VIN .....................$2.95
boneless chicken cooked in a delicious wine sauce,
served with small salad bowl, bread and butter and
spaghetti with tomato sauce
SOUP with any luncheon above .......$1.00
CREPE NICOISE..................$2.95
paper thin crepe filled with assortment of seafood and
vegetables, served with small salad bowl and fruit
garnish
301 W. HURON 663.2403

NOW SHOWING
devious mind of
Alfred Hitchcock,
-- a diabolically
entertaining
motion picture.
pCC
Shows Today At:
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.

1

threatening, tension - filled se- Each character, at some point, roller - coaster ride in This is >mc<== >c::>>< -oo<;;>- >< ><::::
quences, the audience never assumes a false identity which Cinerama.
really feels the characters are subconsciously strengthens his Family Plot's main strengthU
in any great danger. And yet own individuality. There too is lies, however, in the expertise UCec jazz
Hitchcock and screenwriter Er- the element of greed, which of Barbara Harris and Bruce
nest Lehman (who also colla- motivates the impoverished Dern in the starring roles. To-U PR ES E NTS
borated on the memorable Harris - Dern couple to fran-. gether they form one of Hitch-
North by Northwest) have fa- tically seek the $10,000 reward cock's most attractive, funniest
shioned a film rich in theme, - a measly sum compared to screen teams, as each is af-
humor, action and characteriz- the fantastic diamond ransoms forded the ch-ance to display
ation. Devane and Black demand. See FAMILY, Page 7T
the film centers on the need
for trust between men and wo- SEtE A0
men. The Harris and Dern char. SUSPENSE DOUBLE FEATURE 1949
acters are constantly at odds THEIHIRCMANER
with one another, and its shows THE THIRD MANitr nd
in their bungled manhunt. Like ,AT0)
wise, Black is a reluctant kid- (AT 7:00) Thursdayi15
napper - she wishes to give ) Orson Welles stars as Harry Lime, a fascinat-
up crime and settle down with ing man of evil who confounds his friend, ,
boyfriend Devane, who is, con- Joseph Cotton, in a haunting post-war Vienna.
versely, obsessed with the thrill 195 TICKETS NOW ON SALE
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On THOMAS JEFFERSON'S BIRTHDAYL0
DICKA ERN -
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"THOMAS JEFFERSON'S BIBLE AND TA
THE AGE OF REASON-By Tom Paine"
Tuesday, April 13, 1976-8:00 p.m. F
I FOR
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. DIVISION STREET / Nomination of members to the contr
corner of Catherine and Division
* Discussio of contract demands.

AL 2001
ICAL MEETING
IL 15th-5:30 p.m.
THE
Tact negotiating committee.

The story of
a woman's outrage
and a woman's revenge.
L 4ipsde c
It isn't always
an invitation to a kiss.
R TECHNICOLOR
A PARAMOUNT RELEASE .; .

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