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April 09, 1976 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-09

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ji AiMt ian Da4
Eighty-Six Years of Editorial Freedom
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Joining the clergy

by mail order\

Friday, April 9, 1976

News Phone: 764-0552

Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan
Swse
Transcrip proposal unwise

WITH SOME STUDENTS STILL
reeling from the implementation
last semester of a plus and minus
grading system, the LSA faculty ap-
proved a plan, Monday which may
further increase the viciousness of
the undergraduate grade grind.
On a student's transcript, along-
side the grade for a class, will be
listed the average grade of all the
students who took the course that
term. This system represents an at-
tempt by the LSA faculty to facili-
tate the evaluation of a person's per-
formance in relation to his or her
classmates while reducing "grade in-
flation."
The measure, however, will only
serve to magnify the injustices al-
ready inherent in the grading sys-
tem. Some small, specialized classes
tend to attract a majority of stu-
dents who are both extremely mo-
tivated and are capable of high
achievement. These students are al-

ready plagued by curve systems de-
signed to distribute grades over a
wide range, whether or not there is
wide variety of performance. So un-
der pressure born of this new grade
deflation campaign, such students
may be forced to seek less challeng-
ing classes just to avoid the suffo-
cating atmosphere in the areas in
which they are interested.
And at the other end of the spec-
trum, will the average grade in a
mamouth lecture class reflect the
difference in discussion sections
where teachers vary in their effec-
tiveness in clarifying lecture mater-
ial?
It seems the faculty has lost sight
of the most important function of
the grading system: to provide the
student with an efficient means of
self-evaluation and to provide gradu-
ate schools and employers with a
clear and accurate basis for judging
a student's academic performance.

By TOM STEVENS
THERE IS A LEGAL WAY, albeit
shady, to get out of paying virtually
all taxes and obtain thousands of things
free, at discounts and for free, as well
as soaking herds of naive peoples for
cold, hard cash.
Minister Mills operate through the
mail. For anywhere from free to a few
stamps to $1000 you can become an or-
dained clergy member and therefore en-
titled to perform marriages, baptisms
and anything else a seminary-trained
person of the cloth can.
I was ordained by both the Church of
Gospel Ministry and the Universal Life
Church, Gospel Ministry sent me a very
nice card (laminated to boot) and a
sturdy wall certificate which declare me
a legal minister. ULC sent just a card.
ULC (which is located in Modesto,
California) is the biggest and most blat-
ant Minister Mill. It claims 4,000,000 min-
isters and 15,000 churches all over the
free world. Just a letter saying "please
send me information about your minis-
try program" brought me an ordination
in the form of a thin business card. Once
you are ordained, you can ordain count-
less more people in turn. More of the
cards are available from ULC at ten
for a buck, making it easy to pass them
out as party favors.
Plus, ULC is the church that sort of
tells you exactly how to get out of pay-
ing taxes. But . . . ah, discreetly.
ULC can officially register you with
the Federal Government as a non-profit
organization and provide you with an
exemption from taxes.
ULC is run by Kirby Hensley, a man
with a sprite Mark Twainish common
sense philosophy.
What Hensley considers the "ultimate
religion" is freedom, food and sex for all
human beings. Hensley explains: "You
give man his freedom, teach him how
to take care of it . . . a man can only
eat so much . . . and now I mean you
can't just turn him wild; you show him
how to use it and you let him free to do
as he wants."

UABLES. .. LET THEM WORK FOR
GOD.
And don't doubt that there are lots
of people that will actually send their
stuff, hoping perhaps for salvation or
just brainwashed and thoroughly pickl-
ed by such constant "charitable" pleas..,
Of the four Mills I dealt with, the
Church of Gospel Ministry, Inc. of Mo-
desto, California is probably the most
reasonable sounding and straightfor- '
ward. Their literature states that all
money they receive over and above ex-
penses is, given to orphanages or desti-
tute colonies for children or lepers in the
extreme Southern California and in
Mexico just below the border.
They'll ordain you for free but ask that
if possible you send along even "a stamp
. . . or two." For tent dollars you can
get the large wall credential which
"leaves a few dollars for the nuns to
help the children." They ask that you
send at least two dollars if you can.
After you're ordained by the Church
of Gospel Ministry you will probably get
follow-up pleas for cash for the children.
One letter told of the leper colony that
needs money for gauze to bandage the
raw sores of the people there. A pic-
ture of one of the lepers named Gabriel
is included.
Whatever their motives, the Mills are
clustered and screaming together in lit-
tle but loud voices, "Tax us and you've
got to tax big churches too! So tax big
church like you should be taxing big
business!"
Head of the Church of Gospel Minis-
try Irving 0. Tarbox says, "I think it's
obscene that $50 million is spent to erect
a giant cathedral in the shadows of
which poverty and starvation is ram-
pant, when the interest alone on that
kind of money could wipe out all that
poverty!
Amen.
The Right Reverend Tom Stevens is
a member of the Daily Editorial Page
staff.

Farewell to David's

If we can achieve this state, and
Hensley believes we can, then "90 per
cent" of all crime will be wiped out at
the point from which is originates. "All
the prisons would be put out of business
if we follow this," he vouchsafes.
On God, Hensley says, "Your idea (of
a God) is as good as that of any other."
On heaven hell, Hensley says, "Heav-
en is when you got what you want and
hell is when you don't got what you
want." There can't be much sound'theo-
logical arguing on that.
"Everything is a religion," Hensley
says.

Another Minister Mill is Calvary Grace
of Pennsylvania. The literature they send
out is unquestionably the most mud-
dy, confusing and seemingly contradic-
tory.. They're the ones who'll make you
a bishop for a price and that price is
$50. Or, if being a bishop doesn't fit your
personality, they offer a missionary title
for $25.
What really shocks in their literature
however, is how greedy they come off.
A strip of paper enclosed in their infor-
mation packet said: SEND ALL YOUR
GOLtD TEETH, JEWELRY, GOLD
COINS, SPECTACLE WATCHES, VAL-

DAVID'S BOOKS will be going out
of business within a couple of
weeks.
Perhaps more than any other busi-
ness in Ann Arbor, David Kozubei's
book store on Liberty Street held the
consumer's interest at heart. Break-
ing ranks with the rest of the city's
book sellers, David's sold a wide va-
riety of new and used books at large
discounts. Customers found a relax-
ed and trusting atmosphere: they
rarely had to produce identification
when writing checks, and they could
read parts of books before purchas-
ing them..
David's boasted the most compre-
hensive periodical section in town.
And the store housed several smaller
businesses: a book bindery, a copying
center, and an art gallery.
The store attracted a loyal clien-
tele -- but a small one. David's
wasn't able to take in enough money
to stay in the black.
Now, David's customers have the
opportunity to make their last pur-
chases at the store, during a final
clearance sale.
How unfortunate that David
couldn't stay in business to give the
buyer the best deal possible.
So the store will close up, and the
two large emblems, bearing David's
photograph, will be taken down from
over the store window.
"I should have painted a tear on
that picture," David said.
TODAY'S STAFF:
News: Dana Baumann, Phil Bokovoy,
Robert Meachum, Kenneth Parsig-
ian, Annmarie Schiavi, Timothy
Schick, Karen Schulkins, Margaret
YaoI
Editorial: Susan Ades, Michael Beck-
man, Stephen Hersh, Jon Pansius,
Tom Stevens
Arts: Christopher Kochmanski
Photo Technician: Alan Bilinsky

"

David Kozubei

Fditorial Staff
ROB MEACHUM BILL TURQUE
Co-Editors-in-Chief
JEFF RISTINE................ Managing Editor
TIM SCHICK Executive Editor
STEPHEN HERSH ........... Editorial Director
JEFF SORENSEN ................ .. Arts Editor
CHERYL PILATE .. Magazine Editor
STAFF WRITERS: Susan Ades, Tom Allen, Glen
Allerhand, Marc Basson, Dana Bauman, David
Bomquist, James Burns. Kevin Counihan,
Tom Godell, Kurt Harmu, Charlotte Heeg,
Joni Dimick. Mitch Dunitz, Elaine Fletcher,
Phil Foley, Mark Friedlander, David Garfinkel,
Richard James Lois Josimovich, Tom Kettler.
Chris Kochmanski, Jay Levin, Andy Lilly, Ann
Marie Lipinski, George Lobsenz, Pauline Lu-
bens. Teri Maneau, Angelique Matney, Jim
Nicoll. Maureen Nolan, Mike Norton.tKenPar-
sigian, Kim Potter, Cathy Reutter,° Anne
Marie Sohiavi, Karen Schulkins,,Jeff Selbst,
Rick Sobel Tom Stevens, Steve Stojic, Cathi
Suyak, Jim Tobin, Jim Valk. Margaret Yao,
Andrew Zerman, David Whiting, Michael Beck-
man, Jon Panshis and Stephen Kuraman.
Senior Business Staff
BETH FRIEDMAN ............ Business Manager
ANNE KWOK ........... . .. Operations Manger
KATHY MULHERN ............ Display Manager
DAN BLUGERMAN ..,. .. . . .......Sales Manager
DAVE HARLAN ................ Finance Manager

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A O

To The Daily:
AS PART OF the Coalition to
Stop CIA/NSA Recruitment, the
SYL urged a "No" vote on the
upcoming referendum, sponsor-
ed by the MSA, which reads:
"Shall the CIA/NSA be allowed
to recruit on U of M campus?"
We call for students to voice
their outrage at the presence
of - recruiters f o r imperial-
ism's s e c r e t spy agencies
on campus. The CIA and
NSA cannot be reformed.
As institutions of the bourgeois
state, they are part of the re-
pressive apparatus required by
the capitalist class to maintain
its rule over the working mass-
es. Marxists see that the bour-
geois state and its organs can-
not be "controlled", "pressur-
ed" or otherwise used by the
working class and the oppres-
sed to serve their interests. The
organs of bourgeois repression,
including the CIA, NSA, FBI
and police must be smashed
and replaced by the institutions
of worker's rule - the dictator-
ship of the proletariat.
This perspective is not shared
by many self-proclaimed revo-
lutionaries. The Young Socialist
Alliance, the best defenders of
democratic rights", refuses to
call for the abolition of the
CIA, NSA and FBI because it
doesn't want to offend the lib-
erals it tails after, and similar-
ly seeking "respectability" the
Young Worker's Liberation
League members in MSA voted
down a rewording of the refer-
endum proposed by the Coali-
tion to Stop CIA/NSA Recruit-
ment which explicitly condemn-
ed the CIA/NSA. The YSA ac-
cents that the bourgeois state
will remain intact, and in fact

The Revolutionary Student
Brigade denounces the referen-
dum as "right-wing" but made
no bones about lining up with
the real right-wing forces in
the recent war in Angola, in-
cluding the South African army
and the CIA! The RSB also
hails the right-wing "fight-
back" anti-busing movement in
Boston. They shamelessly fol-
low Mao's line that the USSR
is the No. 1 enemy, and sup-
port the build-up of imperial-
ism's armed forces, including
NATO, to smash the Soviet Un-
ion.
Mass protests and exposure
can stop recruiting on campus.
Last term's rally of 500 on the
Diag scared CIA recruiters off
campus, and the Coalition's sit-
in at the Career Planning and
Placement office this term suc-
cessfully prevented NSA inter-
views. The SYL has likewise
played a leading role in similar
unitedifront actions across the
country, including Berkeley, Los
Angeles and Madison. As in
Ann Arbor, we nointed out that
workers revohtion. led by a
Leninist - Trotskyist vanguard
1partv. is the only way to smash
the CIA/NSA and any other in-
stitlitions of repression the bour-
geoisie creates. The SYL is
fighting to build such a revol'i-
tionarv n arty, mobilizing work-
ers and the onpressed arond a
concrete nrogram of anti-cani-
talist demandcs, a winningO'sra-
tegv for smashing canitalist in-
perialicm and replacing it with
worker's rile!
Srartacus Youth
,enagne
April 4, 1976
To The Daily:

this in mind, that [ address the
remainder of my leitter specific-
a'y to the OAS.
There are many supporters
of Israel, Jews and non-Jews
alike, who share knost of your
feelings concerning settlement
in the occupied territories. Yet
when you call for the destruc-
tion of Israel, our support for
your cause comes to an abrupt
end. There must be compromise
and recognition on. both sides if
peace is ever to be a viable
reality. Israel mUst recognize
the national aspirations of the
Palestinians and their right to
a homeland in the now occupied
West Bank and Gaza Strip. In
addition, the Arabs must come
to grips with the reality of the
existence of Israel and recog-
nize her right to also exist as
a sovereign state. If both ac-
tions are not undertaken simul-
taneously, we will continue to
live in an atmosphere of mis-
trust and hatred - an atmos-
phere which will never be con-
dcive to lasting peace.
Israel can exist and Pales-
tine can exist, but only if we
work together in a snirit of
compromise and co-existence.
Let those of us ire the Mid-West
set an example for our sisters
and brothers in the Mid-East.
Cheri Fom-
March 31
Coinpamesimn
To The Daily:
THERE IS ONE word which
I would like to attach to the
already massive vocabularv of
drama critic Jeffrey Selbst:
the word is compassion. Six
weeks ago I *was the victim
of his critical attack.bNo feel-
igs were spared, but I took
it in str'id. thinkzrnctha2t tis

be as biting as possible. To dis-
like a show is one thing, but
to take personal attacks upon
those in the show is absolutely,
uncalled for. It surprises me
that the Daily editors would al-
low such material to be printed.
Obviously, Mr. Selbst is not
ready to restrain himself, so
maybe someone else should.,
Mr. Selbst seems to be, suf-
fering from delusions of Rex
Reed. Perhaps if he would re-
member that he is merely a
college student criticizing acting
students, some of the venom
which he seems to distribute
so freely could be harnessed.
John McCarthy
April 3, 1976
apathy
To The Daily:
IN MY FOUR years in Ann
Arbor, I have seen a once. po-
litically aware and active stu-
dent body degenerate to the
lowest imaginable abyss. The
election of Republican Wendell
Allen in the First Ward Mon-
day was directly attributable
to the apathy of the ward's
large student contingent. What
made this so sad was that the

voters in West Quad and
Quad had less than a two1
walk on the way to and
class to reach the polls.

I'm leaving this town in May
and going back to Detroit, a
city with many problems but al-
so with people who are trying
to formulate constructive solu-
tions to these problems. I hope
the University student body en-
joys living in its $5 pot - fine
ivory tower talking of revolu-
tion and social change while
watching the world go by on the
six o'clock news. When the stu-
dents gripe about repression
by the Republican city council,
let them remember who was
responsible for the make-up of
the council. Whatever the stu-
dents get, they richly deserve.
Maybe. some day they will grow
up and realize that they have
a responsibility for their actions
and inactions and that they
must at least be willing to
spend five minutes at the polls
occasionally if they wish to
bring about any meaningful
change in their world.
Mike Reynolds
April 6

South
block
from

Letters should be typed and limited to
400 words. The Daily reserves the right
to edit letters for length and grammar.
Contact your reps-
Sen. Phillip Hart (Dem), 253 Russell Bldg., Capitol Hill,
Washington, D.C. 20515.

t -4,

- . ~ M UI#t

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