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April 09, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N

Pae Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 9, 19-1

baobab
folk art gallery
123 W. Washington GALLERY HOUR
Ann Arbor Michigan Tuesdav.-Frida
313-662-3681 12-9

Group protests Medic

is
3Y
.9

Saturday
10-6
Jewelry
and other distinctive
gifts from distant
cultures

(Continued from Page 1)
DR. EDWARD Pierce, a
Democratic state Congressional
hopeful whosruns the Summit
Medical Clinic, also spoke about
the cuts, which he claimed were
especially disastrous for elder-
ly arthritis sufferers who dead-
en their pain with non-prescrip-
tion aspirin -- not paid for un-
der the new standards.
At one point during the dem-
onstration someone walking
down the street yelled, "Why
don't you go to work?" and be-
gan swearing at a sign-carrier
------

who responded, "Find me a
job!"
Snow began to fall, but indig-
nance kept spirits high as dem-
Onstrators began to sing, "We
don't care how cold it is, it
don't bother us!"
"I AM ON this Medicaid and
I'm not getting the things I need
to get," said speaker Jessie
Humphrey trying to be heard
over the din.
Othersthad more specific
complaints.
"I need my teeth, you hear
me?" shouted Shirley Lucket,
an Ypsilanti welfare recipient.
"I'm not an old woman, I'm aa
young woman."
LUCKET SAID she had been*
going to the University Dental
School for six months and was

then told she could not have
any work done on her teeth be-
cause dental work is not cov-
ered by Medicaid since the gov-
ernor's order.
Once inside the building, dem-
onstrators demanded to see the
Director of Social Services.:
However, they were informed
he was out of town and jeered
at the appearance of Deputy
Director Carnegie.
A f t e r t r y i n g unsuc-
cessfully to make Carnegie
sign a petition to restore Medic-
aid services, the by then rowdy
crowd headed for their waiting
cars and took off for the state
Fort Ticonderoga stands above
the waters of Lake Champlain.
In 1775, Ethan Allen and his'
Green Mountain Boys captured
the fort from the British.

id cut Student explorer
capitol in Lansing, where they tells ita e of tunnels
were to testify at a series" of
hearings on public health
throughout the day. (Continued from Page 1) ahead of him. If someone wer
those students who can rightfully to follow him the lights comin
claim to have seen the pool on behind him would warn him
under the Union or to have en- "You don't know what kind
tered Martha Cook by subter- of wierdos go down there," h

e
g
n.
d
e

ranean passage in the middle
of the night"

said.

i
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1
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ONEG SHABAT
9:00 p.m. Friday, April 9
SPEAKER:
Rabbi Laura Geller
TOPIC:
The Dawn of a New Era:
Women Rabbis

z

Textile art from three continents " South American an-
tiauities e Contemporary and traditional African sculpture
" Jewelry *"Fashioned from imported beads and silver
"Afghani Rue s 0 Hand carved Gourd boxes from Peru

I

FRI.-SAT.-SUN. $
COONEY

2.50 a
S

H LLEL
)429 HILL ST.

I

On THOMAS JEFFERSON'S BIRTHDAY
SPEAKING ON
"THOMAS JEFFERSON'S BIBLE AND
THE AGE OF REASON-By Tom Paine"
Tuesday, April 13, 1976--8:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. DIVISION STREET
corner of Catherine and Division

I

Songer of old songs
on
12 string, 6 string, banjo, fretless
b a n j o, concertina, tinwhistle,
jawharp, harmonica
TUES.-April 6th-BIFF ROSE!!

(Continued from Page 1)
lies below poverty lines would
cut an estimated 1.4 million per-
sons out of the program.
The measure would decrease
the cost of food stamps for low--
er income recipients and pro-
e an incentive for them to get
jobs.
UNDER THE bill, a four-per-
son family getting $400 a month
from welfare would pay $75 for
$166 worth of food stamps. It
now pays $89 for the same
stamps. If its income included
wages of more than $150 a
month, the family would pay
$54, compared to $65 now.
Proponents of the measure:
said it would trim $241 million:
from next year's food stamp
budget. Without any changes the
goe rnment estimateste $fld
sotamp programilwould st$6y3
PresidentsFodwasthe st
ofihepworgrm cut "$21.2mi-
lion this year.
Election
problemst
(Continued from Pagel1)
and make sure that he didn't
graduate. The incident was wit-
nessed by five poll workers in
the lobby .of the UGLI.
Yesterday afternoon Chikof-
sky decided to move all of the
outdoor pollig sites to indoor
locations because poll workers
were complaining about the
cold. Thm O'Neil, a Students'
Rights Party candidate for
MS Cobjecdtoo themindove
had been done because the
workers wee cold O'Neil re-
plied, "But that's what they're
paid to do.''
As of 11:00 pm yesterday the
elections directors planned to
work through the night in order
to have the results as soon as
possible. Elections director
Mark Berstein said, "We hope
to have the totals by Friday
afternoon or evening."

.ctTURKEY admits to being the
hTurkeyhrecentl treturned to* kind of guy who likes "to make
his old haunt after nearly a ' o u h ie omk
year's absence. Despite the Uni- an impression on everyone he
versity's increased security, he meets. One way he accom-
versty' inreaed scurtyhe lish's this is by telling others
managed to enter the tunnels
viaa scre enrane h reem-ofhis underground exploits.
bered from past expeditions. One can hardly talk to him for
five minutes without being told
HE CONSIDERS himself an his favorite tale.
expert on the tunnel system, and "One night, while showing
now that it is so difficult to some friends around the tunnels,
get into the maze he often we ended up below the Grad.
offers to give guided tours. library. Thinking that the li-
But Turkey never had an ex-' brary was still open, we entered
pert to show him around down via a basement door."
here, he just had to find his "When we had finnally snuck
way by painstaking trial and in, we found out, much to our
error. surnrise, that the library was
"One night, returning to my' locked up solid. This included
dorm, after seeing the movie i the door we had entered
Catch-22, a number of years through! We were forced to
ago," he related, "I noticed charge out an emergency door,
light coming from a hole in a arimid the loud shriek of an as-
grating. Looking through the so~ated alarm."
hole I discovered a whole new Shortly thereafter Turkey lost
world. I entered it several ot in the dorm lottery and de-
nights later," he continued, "and cided to move out to Oxford
found an unlocked door in the hosirg. Oxford's distance from
basement of my dorm." crntral camnus ended his late
niht forays into the tunnels. But
TURKEY spent the rest of the snirit within him has never
that night exploring the maze died.
of tunnels. In the next few years
he investigated the network of Interesting facts
passages, mapping it out as he
went along, locating landmarks The Boy Scout uniform was
by peering out of holes in grat- designed by Charles M. Con-
lags and ventilator boxes. Dur- nally of Troy, N.Y.
ing the winter the path of the
tunnels could be determined ' The emu, the world's second
above ground by following paths largest bird, shares a place on
of melted snow. the Australian coat-of-arms with
Turkey is very cautious when the kangaroo.
down in the tunnels. Every time
he comes to a light switch box, The first successful test of
he turns out the lights behind cable cars in San Francisco was
him and turns on the lights made in August, 1873.

1421 HILL

8:30

761-1451

a

I

t
t
i

9:00
FRIDAY

i

F:

LSA Students

The College of LSA does not provide for adequate student participation
in college decision-making. That is why the LSA Student Government
is continually working for meaningul student representation College
committees. It also means that those student seats that do exist on
College committees are even more critical to students.
The LSA Student Government is now interviewing for
openings on the following committees:
COLLEGE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
LSA ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD
STUDENT-FACULTY BOARD
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
SIGN UP for an INTERVIEW in Room 4000 Michigan Union
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION is FRIDAY, April 9, 1976 at 5:00 p.m.
Terms to run for the 1976-77 school year

ce
25c
beer
LAW QUAD LOUNGE-$1.50 Cover

Quinlan ruling will
not be appealed

i

(Continued from Page1) 1
court named her father to that
role, all said they would not
appeal.
THE.hospital reached its de-
cision early yesterday after its
21-member hoard of trustees met
in private, according to a
spokesmanfor Lawrence Stern,
who represents the board.
Armstrong said Wednesday
that "it's certainly within the
hospital's by-laws" for the trus-
tees to appoint themselves as the
ethics committee.
But there was still no indica-
tion that the trustees made any
decision yesterday other than to
refrain from appealing.
"THE ethics committee does
not exist yet as far as I know,"

Porzio said yesterday.
The Quinlans had said after
the ruling that they would wait
to see if any appeals were
planned before attempting to ful-
fill the court's requirements.
On the day, of the ruling,
Joseph Quinlan said, "We hope
at the last minute the Lord will
take her and we won't have to
remove her from the respira-
tor."
Ms. Quinlan lapsed into the
coma April 15, 1975, after ap-
parently ingesting liquor and
tranquilizers. She has been con-
nected to a respirator ever since
and doctors have described her
condition as chronic and vegeta-
tive.

GOING-OUT-OF-BUSINESS SALE
DAVID'S BOOKS
529 E. LIBERTY

,

THE KITE SEASON IS HERE I
Centicore Is Ann Arbor's Headquarter for All Kite
E x p e r t s, Neophytes, Dilettantes, Aerodynamicians,
Poets, Scientists, Freaks, Spies, Restauranteurs, Streak-
ers & Beauticians.
OUR HUGE SELECTION of KITES
from All Over the World Has Just'
Arrived. Come See Them.
FROM $3.00 TO $38.00
--.ec asa a A -.A s a. a l .a . .t a.t .a . it s - "17v
THAI DRAGON AIRFOILS
INDIAN FIGHTER MYLAR BOX4
GHOST CLIPPER SHIP SILK DRAGON+
DOUBLE BOX CENTIPEDE <
SUPER BAT BAT4
PEACOCK MYLAR DRAGON4
BIPLANES & TRIPLANES FORMOSA BUTTERFLY
BULLET and Dozens More
We Have a Fair Supply of Beautifully Painted
Kites from Mainland China

Prints & Posters ............ 40%
New Books ...............40%
Used Hardcovers...........40%
Used Paperbacks .......... 60%
Calendars......... .. 70%
Shelving, etc.
ALBERT'S COPYING

off
off
off
off
off

SUBSC IB

owy

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LOCATION for Years into the future.

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