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April 04, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-04

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Pose Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 4, 1976

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN_ -L

-,

NOW OPEN
Ram's Head
Leather
wr I Works, Ltd.
539 E. Liberty
Between David's Books and John Leidy
HAND CRAFTED LEATHER GOODS
Jackets, bags, luggage, backpacks, hats,
vests, belts, buckles, sheepskin coats,
wallets, briefcases.
Famous Walter Dyer Moccasins

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ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
MORRIS RISENHOOVER, director
ARTHUR HONEGGER
KING DAVID
original chamber orchestration
John McCollum
guest soloist and narrator
SUNDAY, April 4, 1976-4:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
corner Huron and Fletcher Sts.

adm. $2.50

students $1.25

,f tWtf.a
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Next year
you could be on
scholashp
- s
An Air Force ROTC 2-year scholarship. Which not only pays your tuition,
but also gives you $100 a month allowance. And picks up the tab for your
books and lab fees, as well.
And after college, you'll receive a commission in the Air Force...go on to
further, specialized training..: and get started as an Air Force officer. There'll
be travel, responsibility, and a lot of other benefits.
But it all starts right here...in college...in the Air Force ROTC. Things
will look up...so look us up. No obligation, of course.
AFROTC, NORTH HALL, Phone 764-2403
Put it all together in Air Force ROTC.

Door-to-door rests
on student turnout
(Continued from Page 1) over of students necessitates im-
City council hopefuls innthat plementation of the system.
ward, including one "phantom
candidate", has failed to gener- "The turnover is crucial," he
ate much election fever among asserted, referring to the thou-
campus area voters. sands of unregistered freshper-
Hebert and other local Dem- sons who enter the University
ocrats have scoured the district each September. "They pay
as the vote draws near, trying their rent, they pay their taxes.
to instill some election day en- They should have a voice to
thusiasm into the Ward. see that their money is not
wasted"
"THIS (door-to-door) gets peo-
ple interested in the city," he OF THE 4,000 people who
said, referring to the easy way were registered by the door-to-
in which students can re-estab- door method since September,
lish a voice in government, with anonroximately 3,000 were stu-
less effort on their part. dents, according to Winnifred
Hebert said the yearly turn-. Hodges, Deputy City Clerk.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Sunday, April 4 Children, background food/nutri-
DAY CALENDAR tion. dietetics, home econ., insti
WUOM: State of the Union-Col- managemtnt.
orado, bicentennial documentary, 1 Monday, April 5
p, in. DAY CALENDAR
Musical Society: Don Cossacks. WUOM : David Lewis, "The His-
Hill Aud., 2:30 p.m. tory of Entrepreneurship in Ameri-
Music School: Bizet's, "Carmen," can Business," U-M course, winter
MAndelssohn, 8 p.m term, 1976, 10 a mn.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT Political Science: Lynn Mytelka,
3200 SAB, 764-7456 Carleton U., Ottawa, Canada, "Di-
Recruiting on Campus: Bureau of rect Foreign Investment and Andean
Budget, State of Ill. for Budget An- Integration," 1017 Angell, noon.
alysts on Apr. 7; Oxford Univ Press Ctr. Russian/E. European Studies/
for text book sales personnel on Economics: Bela Csikos-Nagy, "In-
Apr. 9. Phone for appt , 764-7456. ternational Aspects of the New Hun-
Summer Internship Program: Edi- garian Economic Mechanism," W.
torlal Ass't. & Programmer Analyst Conf. rm., Rackham, 4 p.m
- Jr. yr, or grad. student with 1 Ctr. Western European Studies:
yr. before graduation, Journ or CCS Michel D. Certeau, "Oral Culture in
majors, deadline Apr. 9, apply Sum- the Literate Society," Lee, rm. 2,
mer Internship Program, Placement MLB, 4 p.m
Dept., Meredith Corp., 1716 Locust Anthropology: Niara Sudarkasa,
St., Des Moines, Iowa 50336 Phone "The Study of Family Structures in
763-4117 for additional information. Africa: A Critique," E. Conf. rm.,
Rackham, 4 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT! Near Eastern Studies/Program in.
3200 SAS, 763-4117 Judaic Studies: Dr. Nahum M, San-
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed: Inter- na, Brandeis U, "The Superscrip-
view Weds., Apr 7, 9-12, openings tions to the Psalms and the Activi-
include nurses, supervisors, soc. ties of the Musical Guilds," lecture
workers, cooks, kitchen staff rm. 1. MLB, 4:10 p.m.
Camp Sequoia, MI. Coed: Inter- Human Physiology Films: Lecture,
view Mon., Apr. 5, 1-5, openings "Reproduction," S. Lec., Mtd. Sc,
western riding instr. and riflery II, 7-9 p.mE
(m), register. Ptoject Community: Rachel Ka-
Camp Metamore, Metro G. S. mel, asst. editor, Michigan Free
Camp: Interview Thurs, Apr. 8, Press, "Criminal Justice and Prison
10-4:30. General positions open: wa- Struggles in the Third World," Aud.
terfront, arts/crafts, athletics, na- C. Angell, 7:30 p.m.
ture, drama, dance, etc., register. Music School: Edward L. Smith,
Camp Niobe, Coed, MI.: Will in- conductor, Jazz Band, Rackham{
terview Fri., Mar 9, 1-5. Openings Aud., 8 p in.
working with emotionally disturbed, GENERAL NOTICE
Waterfront (WSI), gen counselors, AAUP Chapter meeting: W. Allen
arts/crafts, nature, general sports, Spivey, chairman, Program Evalua -
register. tion Committee, "University Plan-
Regal Lawn Service, Dearborn, MI. ning: Annoying But Necessary,"
Openings for general landscaping & noon luncheon, Thurs., April 8, res-
maintenance services. ervations needed, 764-1420 by 11
Colorado Dept. Education: Open- a.m., Tues., April 6, election of
ing Asst. Food Service Program for officers, Bates rm , U Club.

Candidate tackles
the campaign trail
(Continued from Page 1) callers as he tramples across,
he called, nearly half on this wet- grass from one dwelling to
occasion.,Afterta couple of ex- another. A recent volunteer in-
periences, putting his curly vites him in forsome coffee and
gray-haired head close to the (declined in the interests of
door, he concludes that the un- time) and some procedural in-
retrieved newspaper spells an formation. He tries to make it
empty apartment. This goes for thorough but brief - hoping
the manager's residence as to get to some more houses.
well, but he still makes an ef-, Black has been dedicating the
fort to remain undetected until better part of his weekends and
after the damage is done, slip- most of his weeknights to the
ping pamphlets between door campaigning effort, for over a
handle and frame as quietly as month. One of the first things
possible. he wants to do if elected is to
Drivmg to some condomin- reduce the length of campaign-
iums, one finds the clientele ing time allowed before the
different - the richly carpeted, election, partially to reduce the
highly decorated interiors re- financial expense.
flect a lifestyle foreign to most After a grueling evening, it is
students. easy to see that money is not
The responses are decidedly the only way a candidate has
more "civil" in tone. Black to pay.
adds a sentence to his mono-,
logue; he explains how he!
knows of their special problems Ward
of double taxation and bad~
street repair. "I used to be one
of your neighbors, and so I
know about your situation," heh p u
says with a knowing nod and
a steady glance through the ; f
top of his tri-focals. 1
THE SUN slowly descends as
the task grinds on. House lights (
are flipped on to check out the (Continued from Page 1)

i

personnel, firing them if neces-

sary.

I -N--. . a

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Reynolds is "pretty satisfied"
with the police department. He
1 also sees no problems with the
" " enforcement of the city's Hu-
man Rights Ordinance, another
J issile important to the other
" ward candidates.
According to Kohn, the ordi-
euphoric nance's prohibition of specific
discriminatory acts "are not
(Continued from Page 1) common to other parts of the
Bridge is a maddeningly ad- country." She charges that the
dictive game. It's easy, but city's Human Rights Depart-
thoroughly unpredictable. ment has been negligent in en-
DUPLICATE tournaments'are forcing the law and calls for the
sponsored by the American firing of the department's head.
Contract Bridge League (ACB- GREENE, instead of advocat-
L), a non - profit organization NEintaofdvc-
with over 200 000 members in ing a firing, urges the depart-
with oment's reorganization under a
the United States, Canada, and new Human Services Commis-
Mexico. sion ,thus "bringing in new
in a school as competitive as blood." The commission, whose
the University it is only appro- purpose is to administer CDRS
priate that there are many funds, is a major issue with
bridge addicts. "I spend more Greene.
time playing bridge than going The most important issue in
to class," remarks one student. this race, however, is the city's
housing problem. All three can-
THE MICHIGAN DAILV didates agree that more housing
Volume LXXXVI, No. 151 inspectors are a necessity.
Sunday, April 4, 1976 Greene says he will fund the
is edited and managed by studentinspectors with CDRS money.
at the University of Michigan. Newsinp
phone 764-0562. Second class postage Reynolds, unsure, says that
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. revenue from fines paid by
Published d a i l y Tuesday through housing code violators could
Sunday morning during the Univer-cotiueoinptrsare.
city year at 420 Maynard Street, An contribute to inspector salaries.
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription Kohn, although asserting
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes- throughout the campaign that
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann all property taxes should be re-
Arbor
Summer session published Tues. placed by income taxes, thinks
day through Saturday morning. a property tax should be asses-
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann~ sed to religious buildings, and
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann this money could pay r the in-
spectors.

II

THIS WEEK AT:
Ann Arbor's Premium
Rock and Roll Night Club
LIVE MUSIC AND DANCING
EVERY NIGHT
SUNDAY
Featuring: CLOUD BURST
-PLUS-
PITCHER NIGHT
(Special Discount Prices on Pitchers)
MONDAY
Featuring: AFTER HOURS
-PLUS-
TEQUILA NIGHT:
All Tequila Drinks 1/2 PRICE All Night
TUESDAY

I

ATTENTION SENIORS:
GRADUATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
are available for purchase at the Recep-
tion Desk, L.S.A. building lobby.
5/$1.00

Will be taking applications April 5-April

12 for

Fall Book

Rush 1976

1. All applications taken between APRIL 6 and APRIL 12, 1976 will receive EQUAL CON-
SIDERATION (along with those taken between JUNE 3 and JUNE 10, 1976) for FALL
BOOK RUSH.
2. Applications taken during the times specified in (1) will be placed into random hiring
order by means of lottery.
3. The Cellar will take applications at times other than those given in (1), HOWEVER,
these applications will be placed in hiring order BY DATE OF APPLICATION and will
receive priority AFTER those taken between the dates in (1).
4. All applicants hired for Fall Rush will be notified by mail or phone during the summer.
Rush jobs are, unfortunately, only TEMPORARY. The Cellar pays $2.50 to start.
5. FORMER RUSH EMPLOYEES IN GOOD STANDING do NOT need to re-apply for Fall
Rush and will receive priority over all applications taken in (1).
6. Permanent positions open after rush will be filled by employees who worked Fall Rush.
Post-Rush hiring is done DEPARTMENTALLY on the basis of RUSH.
7. PERFORMANCE & ABILITY WORK SCHEDULED HOURS AVAILABLE.
8. After Sept. 30, 1976, all unused applications will be thrown away. It will be necessary
for these applicants to re-apply for EACH future rush they wish to work. ABSOLUTELY
NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE UPDATED OR KEPT ON FILE FOR FUTURE RUSHES.

CARL OGLESBY
(Former National S.D.S. President,
Co-Director, Assassination Information Bureau)
WILL SPEAK ON
"WHO KILLED JESUS CHRIST?
-THE BIBLE AS COVER-UP"
SUN., APRIL 4-8:00 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE

I

I

Featuring: SKY

KING.

-PLUS-
50c DISCOUNT on All Drinks
BETWEEN 9 & 10 P.M.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT NIGHT
ONLY 50c ADMISSION For Students
-PLUS-
SKY KING
For Your Dancing Enjoyment

218 N. DIVISION
TOWARD A SPIRITUAL

POLITICS

a: :ti i iititi <:":+ , ii'i :{iy?.'. s Gt" vT:yrv,'.";ifie :;:

J:11VY'M ' .'i1

THURSDAY thru SATURDAY

Featuring: SKY

KING

' )="?QY:+
UAC/eclipse jazz
PRESENTS
CECIL
TAYLOR V
IN CONCERT
Thursday, April 15

I

Bring a New Friend,
Meet an Old Friend, at:
cur uw rf a

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