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April 01, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-01

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Thursday, April 1, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thrdy pi , 96TEMCIANDiYPg he

East Quad to try co-op
beginning in September

-CORRECTIONS-

By DIANE CUPPS ious discussion about the work
The corridors in East Quad involved," she commented, "-
may seem typical of any Uni- and we are planning on about
versity dorm this year, however eight hours of work per week -
next year one hall will expert- some decided that co-op living
ment with a very different resi- was not for them." She added
dential concept. As of Septem- "We asked 'Why are you inter-
ber, 1976, East Quad will try ested? What do you have to
its hand at co-opdrative living. offer?' We have to make sure
The idea originally sprung these people are committed or
from East Quad students who else it'll never work."
were. dissatisfied with regular ALTHOUGH many of the
dorm living. According to East practical details have yet to
Quad Resident Advisor Irene be worked out, the co-op is well{
Dorzback, these students want- into its planning stage. Signifi-,
ed a greater sense of commun- cantly, co-op students will pay
ity. "They didn't feel they for their room, but they will
were a part of the real world," not pay for the dorm meal plan.
she explained "they were hav- Instead, co-opers will buy and
ing things done FOR them by prepare their own food at a cost
living in a dorm, they didn't of S60 per month per person.
feel they had enough respon- The corridor reserved for the
sibility over their own lives." co-op consists of two double and
After careful screening and eight single rooms. All the cook-
much discussion, six males and ing will be done in the two
six females have been chosen doubles. The students will also
to live on the experimental hall. do all the housekeeping chores
All will be sophomores in the for the halls.
fall. RA Dorzback emphasized Each student signs a contract
that no-one was rejected by the which allows co-op members
selection committee. "After ser- the right to vote out anyone who
Nuclear safety action
gains new adherents

does not fulfill his obligations
as outlined in the contract. RA
Dorzback termed it "more a
moral contract than a legal
one".
When asked about the prob-
able success of the co-op experi-
ment, Dorzback replied, "at
least we'll be able to give it a
try . . . and hopefully it'll setC
a precedent for things to come.
They seem to be twelve re-.
sponsible people and I'm veryj
confident that they can make
it."
ROMANTIC BRITISH
KANSAS CITY W) - Are
the British traditionally aus-
tere, reserved and unromantic?
Not when it comes to Valen-
tine's Day, avers Hallmark re-
searcher Flora Mears, who spe-
cializes in old English folklore.
Valentine's Day was cele-
brated in England as early as
the 15th century, when the cus-!
tom was for the girls in a com-
munity to write their names on
a slip of paper and put them in
a jar. Each young man would
then draw out a name and pin.
the paper to the sleeve of his
coat. This indicated whom heI
would escort during the Valen-
tine's Day festivities - and,
also gave rise to the expression.
"he wears his heart on his
sleeve."
It also is believed in some
parts of England that the first
bachelor a girl sees through
her window on Valentine's Day
morning is the man she will
marry within a year. Another
old British legend, according to
Miss Mears, has it that if a girl
Puts a handful of bay leaves
sprinkled with rose water under
her billow on Valentine's Eve,
her future husband will appear
in a dream.

will appear Saturday, April 3 for all
those people whose sublet ads ap-
peared incorrectly due to a Daily
error.
DEADLINE FOR ALL CALLS: NOON, FRI., APR. 2
DIAL 764-0560

??WORRIED ABOUT PASSOVER?"'
Consider Having Your Seder at CHABAD HOUSE
In a Worm, Joyous Chassidik Atmosphere and also consider our
Kosher food service during the entire holiday.
RESERVATIONS NOW BEING TAKEN

For Information Call
995-3276 (99-LEARN)

BUY

SELL

TRADE

or Write To:
CHABAD HOUSE
715 Hill St.
Ann Arbor, Ml 48104

Donation
$5.00
per Seder

BASEBALL CARDS, AUTOGRAPHS, YEARBOOKS,
TICKET STUBS, UNIFORMS, ETC.
SEE on display uniform worn by Al Kaline in his final
game at the second Ypsilanti
SPORTS COLLECTORS CONVENTION
TO BE HELD AT THE SPAGHETTI BENDER
23 N. WASHINGTON, YPSILANTI
SUNDAY, April 4-9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Admission $1.00

Information 485-2450

Yom Ha-Sho-ok
Memorial Program

i
ri

White Roots of Peace
The Iroquois people have always considered an aggressive
"pursuit of peace" to be their mission. In September, 1969,
a group of young Mohawks set out to renew their conm-
mitment to these traditions. Since they followed the in-
structions of the White Roots of Peace, they took that
as a name to symbolize their group's task. Since then,
the original group has been joined by peoples of other
Indian nations as they criss-crossed the North American
continent to meet in hundreds of reservations, colleges, pri-
sons, and with other interested groups.
For traditionalist Indians-those who still keep to their
original values-their message is one of hope and en-
couragement. Their work is to establish revitalized Indian
strength and unity in this land and life.

Yvs
r
ON"
I
1 ":
t?

A commemoration of the deaths of
million Jews in the Nazi Holocaust.
THURSDAY, April 1st,
8:30 p.m., at HILLEL
1429 H ILL ST.

six

For tens of thousands of non-Indians, the White Roots of Peace have provided an
interpretation of current events, traditional views of peace and harmony with the
Creation, and brotherhood for all peoples.
ANN ARBOR-Sunday, April 4th-
Michigan Union Ballroom
" {::Y}:"}r:F}:{.:" }:::irv } +'.".}"}.;.}:.}%kS"{ .!YFF''"'x}:":; :4Y ,esr fry"{{ e.}" e'; :";i}S G;... m ntes

4

mommumm

By LAURIE YOUNG
"We are optimistic that we
will meet our June 9 deadline"
says Marcy Bohm, PIRGIM
Public Interest Group in Michi-
gan) Safe Energy Coordinator
for the Ann Arbor area.
Currently, PIRGIM staffers
have collected 50,000 out of the
212,000 signatures needed to put
the citizen - sponsored nuclear
safety proposal on the Novem-
ber ballot. In Ann Arbor alone,
they have garnered 10,000 sig-
natures since February 9.
THE PROPOSAL gives the
state legislature extensive con-
trol over nuclear power plant
construction in Michigan. It re-
quires that each plant carry
full liability insurance to cover
all potential . damage from a
plant accident. Also, each in-
stallation must demonstrate that
its emergency back-up systems
work and that a safe method
exists whereby radioactive
wastes can be stored until they
are no longer toxic.
If the proposal should gain a
majority, it would become law,
subject to amendment only
through a 3/4 vote plurality of
all Michigan citizens.
The initiative would apply on-

ly to future plant construction.
Those presently built or under
construction would ze exempt.
FEDERAL officials eventual-
ly want to build some 50 to 100
nuclear plants in Michigan.
Three operating plants already
exist in Michigan along the
shore of Lake Michigan. Appar-
ently, Michigan is an attractive
site for nuclear plants because
of the abundant supply of cold
water from the Great Lakes.
The proposition has endorse-,
ments from such groups at the
Michigan Audubon Society, Sier-
ra Club, United for Survival,
Friends of the Earth, and the
Alliance for Clean Energy.
"Some people mistake the
initiative for a nuclear mora-
torium" says Bohm. "Rather

" a rbor,'film cooperative
TONIGHT-Thursday, Apr. 1
ROMA
(Federico Fellini, 1972) AUD A-7 only
Rather than a look at Rome by Fellini, this film is another
dazzling look at Fellini with Rome as the background.
Includes a flashback of young Federico coming to Rome
for the first time, a hilarious and irreverent Vatican show,
cameo appearances by ' Anna Maqnani, and Gore Vidal,
plus a stunning finale-waves of modern Visigoths on
motorcycles.
THE BURMESE HARP

i

THIS THURSDAY, April 1
has been set aside as a memorial day of mocrning for
the 6,000,000 Jews, victims of the Nazi Holocaust
1933-1945.
JEWISH POPULATION FIGURES 1939-1945

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 148
Thursday, April 1, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i ly Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

(Kon Ichikawa, 1956)

AUD A-9 only

we are trying to
issues of safety
advocates have
thus far."
"I don't think
has accurate
states Nuclear

force the key
that nuclear
circumvented
that PIRGIM
information,"
Engineering

One of the strongest anti-war films of all time,, THE
BURMESE HARP was Ichikawa's first international success.
It explores the question of responsibility for wars with a
melachonly beoutv. A Japanese Private stationed in
Burma during the final days of W.W. II experiences the
horrors of killing and becomes a monk, traveling the coun-
trvside and burying the dead.sHis anouish is not fatalistic,
and the film is not bleak-it is haunting, poetic, and
beautifully photographed. 1956 San Giorgio Prize in
Venice, Japanese with subtitles.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
$1.25 single show $2.00 double feature

COUNTRY JEW
POLAND
U.S.S.R.
RUMANIA
HUNGARY
CZECHOSLOVAKIA
FRANCE
GERMANY
LITHUANIA
HOLLAND
LATVIA
BELGIUM
GREECE
YUGOSLAVIA
AUSTRIA
ITALY
BULGARIA
OTHERS

ISH POPULATION--1939
3,200,000
2,100,000
850,000
404,000
315,000
300,000
210,000
150,000
150,000
95,000
90,000
75,000
75,000
60,000
57,000
50,000
20,000

JEWS KILLED
2,800,000
1,500,000
425,000
200,000
260,000
90,000
170,000
135,000
90,000
85,000
40,000
60,000
55,000
40,000
15,000
7,000
6,000

% KILLED
85%
71.4%
50%
49.5%
82.5%
30%
81%
90%
60%
89.5%
44.4%
80%
73.3%
66.6%
26.3%
14%
30%

I

TOTAL:

8,301,000

5,978,000

72%

u

Prof. Kikuchi. "We are the ex-
perts in this field but PIRGIM
has never contacted us. We
have invited them to discuss theR
initiative many times, but there
has been no communication be-
tween us."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Ut yRp .q /5p .,v, y~y/ ,(,y . . t Y(. {11 ..V1"y.1:'yl"S;:{N.;.tS.:.t\A ::: "

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of 'the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Notices
should be sent in TYPEWRIT-
TEN FORM to 409 E. Jefferson,
before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication and by 2
p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication.
For more information, phone
164-92'tr.
Thursday, April 1
Day Calendar
WUOM: Susan Brownmiller, fem-
inist author, Rape: Against Our
yWil, "Changing Sex Roles in Fu-
ture Societies," 10 am.
Ctr. Human Growth/Development:
The. Ascent-of Man: The Grain in!
the Stone, Aud. 4, MLB 11 am.
Pendleton Ctr.: lBeth Fitts,
"Dance: The Other Art," Pendleton
Rm., Union, noon.
Ctr. Japanese Studies: Wm. Stes-a
licke, "SMON:n atrogeneis in Ja-
pan," Commons Rm., Lane Hall,
noon.
Public Health Films: Danny and
Nicky, Aud., SPH II, 12:10 pm.
,Behavorial Science: Walter Reit-
man, "Computer Simulation," Lec.
Rm. 1, MLB, 3:30 pm.
MHRI: Lawrence Eng., V. A.!
Hasp., Palo Alto, Calif., "The Im-
munohistochemical Localization of
Brain - Specific Proteins at the
Light and Electromicroscopic Lev-
els," 1057 MRL 3:45 m.
Geology/Mineralogy: Asher P.
Schick, Hebrew U., Jerusalem,
t'Present Day Geographic Process-
es in Arid Environments," 1528
CCL, 4 pm.
Sociology: Rosabeth Moss Kanter,
Harvard, 'Women in Organizations:
How Organizational Structure

Shapes Work, Behavior and Work
Prospects," Rackham, 4 pm..
Guild House: Carl Oglesby, "Wat-
ergate I: The Hughes Nixon Con-
nection," Aud. B., Angell, 4 p.m.;
Tonyy and Pat Stoneburner, Deni-
son U., George A. White, M.I.T.,
Brother David Steindlrast, Mt. Sa-
viour Monastery, Recollections of
a Campus Minister, of the late Rev.
J. Edgar Edwards, 802 Monroe, 7:30
pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Develop-
ment/Educ: Gerald Lesser, "Chil-
dren and Television: Lessons from
Sesame Street," Schorling Aud.,
SEB, 4 pm.
Physics: E. Eugarbaker, "Proton
Intrinsic States in 163Tb and 169
Ho," P&A Colloquium Rm., 4 pm;
A. C. T. Wu, "Approach to Com-
plex Angular Moments in Axiomatic
Field Theory," 2038 Randall Lab,
4:15 pm.
Romance Languages: Tristano Bo-
lelli, U. of Pisa, Italy, "The Lin-
guistic Theories ofaGiacomo Leo-
pardi," E. Conf. Rm., Rackham,
4:10 pm.
U Players: Herbert III, Arena,
Frienze, 4:10 pmmi.
American Heritage Night: Wash-
ington, D. C. menu: League Cafe-
teria, 5-7:15 pm.
Women's Studies: Virginia Woolf:
The Moment Whole; Gertrude
Stein: When This You See Remem-
ber Me, Lee. Rm. 2, MLB, 7 pm.
Music School: Opera, "Carmen,"
Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
Ctr. Western European Studies:
Kenneth Maxwell, "Revolution and
Counter, Revolution in Portugal
1974-76," Assembly Hall, Rackham,
8 pm.
Musical Society: Waberly Con-
sort, Rackham Aud., 8:30 pm.

GUILD HOUSE and CANTERBURY HOUSE
present
TWO POETRY EVENTS
RECOLLECTIONS OF A CAMPUS MINISTER
U OF M ALUMNI-Tony and Pat Stone-
burner, George A. White, and Dr. David
Steindl-Rast
read and remember the works of the late
J. Edgar Edwards
THURSDAY, April 1st at 7:30 p.m.
at GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe
POETRY OF DAVID JONES AND DENISE
LEVERTOV IN SPOKEN WORD AND
VISUAL IMAGERY
TONY AND PAT STONEBURNER will
present on evening of readings, enhanced
by visual images
FRIDAY, April 2nd at 8:00 p.m.
at CANTERBURY HOUSE,
218 N. Division
onnea a m n n naxxx

the
der

U~

dog!
In the world of politics an underdog'is one who is con-
sidered no threat to the power block. Wendell Allen is a
young, black Republican who has a family and works for a
living. That doesn't make him the underdog but he is not
supported by special interest groups or the big political
machine, and that does.
Wendell Allen has the guts to take a stand on tough issues
and that's important.

,i TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT

rTTTTTTTTTC.

1'TTTTTTT

PATHS TO SELF-AWARENESS
--a series of lecture discussons and demonstrations on
spiritual awakening
Gestalt Therapy: Attaining Wholeness
with MICHAEL ANDES
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 1
at 8:00 p.m.
at CANTERBURY HOUSE

UAC/eclipse jazz
Presents
WEATHER
REPORT
with SPECIAL GUEST STAR
DAVE LIEBMAN
and LOOKOUT FARM
IN CONCERT

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ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 1946
NOTORIOUS
ngrid Bergman is the drunken, disillusioned daughter of
a Nazi agent. Cary Grant is a suave secret service man
who gives.her a chance to make good. "Truly my favorite
Hic ki, ctre.' rsos Frnnis Truffanit A susnenseful )

THURSDAY, APRIL 1
HILL AUD.-8 P.M.

Elect Wendell

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