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March 27, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-27

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 27, 1076 I

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 27, 1976

. _..

Steak & Eggs
For $1.75
AT A
CAMPUS GRILL RESTAURANT
808 S. STATE ST.

MR

I

Argentine junta gains
recognition by U.S.

Ward 3 dominated by party rhetoric

J

(Continued from Page 1)
They estimated that nearly
4,000 people have been detained
since Wednesday's coup.
The Buenos Aires Herald said
two officials being held are
former Defense Minister Jose
Deheza and former Press Sec-
retary Osvaldo Papaleo.
PERON was reported under
custody 900 miles south of
Buenos Aires in a luxury retreat
house owned by a provincial
government.
Paste this inside
your medicinecabinet. _

Authorities said her personal{
security was guaranteed, butl
there was no word on her con-'
dition or activities sinceshe was
flown to the mountain hideaway'
during the coup.
In a speech last night General
Adolfo Sigwald, who is in charge
of Buenos Aires province, stress-
ed the military action was not
aimed at any particular politicall
party.'
"OUR ONLY enemies are de-
linquents of all kinds, economic
and social," the general said.
11-1 7
E n ma r rar

LECTURE
PROF. EMIL FACKENHEIM
outstanding philosopher of the Holocaust
WILL SPEAK ON
"This Moment in Jewish History: A Theological,
Philosophiscal, and Mythical Understanding of
the State of Israel and It's Positions in the
World."
At 8 p.m.-Sunday, March 28
at H I LLEL
1429 HILL ST.
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!Amiericans.
I . U I
1 Cancer SocietyI
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTEDBY THEPUBLISHER

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(Continued from Page 1)
priorities, taking much the
same positions that won him a
majority of votes in the 1974
council elections.
HE CALLS rising taxes one
of his concerns. According to
the mustachioed Republican,
the best way to combat the
heavy tax load on the average
homeowner is to broaden the
tax base. He proposes to accom-
plish this "by encouraging
compatible industry to come to
Ann -Arbor."
Bertoia also stresses a tra-
ditional point of Republican
ideology - financial responsi-
bility. "We want to put the
city back on fiscal security,"
he said.
"Right now we are looking
at a 1.4 million dollar debt in
the city," he added, placing the
blame on Mayor Wheeler's
hiring policies.
"WE'RE up to around 1300
city employees now," Bertoia
complained.
"When (former Republican
Mayor James) Stephenson left
office, there were 1100 on the
staff and the city was operat-
ing in the black. We (the Re-
publicans) are not into creat-
ing big government."
"We Republicans run a quiet
ship," Bertoia asserted further.
"We don't look for big hot is-
sues."
THE MORE liberal Black

! may have some trouble making commander for every three pa- words for the present Wheeler
an impression in the tradition-; trolmen," he noted. administration, whose council
ally Republican Third Ward. HOWEVER, Black points out meetings he likened to a
Geographically the largest that "strong police unions "zoo."
ward in the city and comprised make re-arrangement of the po- HE further suggested that
of almost the entire eastern Elice department difficult." the city's Democratic party
third of the city, it is one of Bertoia agrees tha t police comes close to being a political
the most homogeneous areas in protection is a problem, but he machine, "much like the Daley
terms of its constituency. It is did not consider re-organization machine in Chicago." He charg-
composed largely of middle- of the department to be a ed that "the Wheeler machine
aged homeowners and few stu- wholesale solution. is dedicated to excluding citizen
dents. Consequently, Third BLACK and Bertoia sub- input, to lining their pockets,
Ward constituents tend to be stantially disagree on the need and to political cronyism."
disposed toward Republican for more minority representa- Black said that every coun-
priorities, a fact born out by tion on the police force as well cil member has been guilty of
past elections. as the rest of the city hall staff. "unruly, disruptive behavior,
Like Bertoia, Black, a re- "We have only eight women! engaging in real strange trivial-
search chemist with Parke-Da- in patrol cars out of a force of ity, and outbursts of angry in-
vis, favors the recruitment of approximately 158," Black re- vective."
light industry into the area. But ported, "and only three out of BLACK and Bertoia agree on
he opposes further construction 30 of the top city hall jobs. two of the three ballot propos-
of residential developments un- BERTOIA dismisses minority als. Both favor the road mill-
til problems of draining - re- representation as simply an- age tax, though they say it will
sponsible for floods of sewer j other instance of an "all show be just a drop in the bucket in
systems in the south sector of j-no go" campaign issue. "I relation to what is needed.
the ward - are solved. . ( have faith that Sy (City Admin- Surprisingly, .for a Demo-
BLACK says he would recom-I istrator Sylvester Murray) - crat, Black agrees with Bertoia
mend lopping off some of the being black - will take care that preferential voting should
lower priority items at the bot- of minority issues," he said. be repealed, saying, that "my
tom of the list" to avoid a tax , Pet control is also recogniz- constituents don't like it -
increase. j ed by both candidates as a ma- they are hassled by it."
Inadequate police protection jor concern in their ward. Both Door-to-door voter registra-
is one of the main problems in favor a stricter leash law than tion was the only measure up-
the eyes of ward residents, ac- the one presently in effect. Ber- on which the candidates differ.
cording to Black. He termed it toia suggested that it is a fairly Black favors the proposal,
"a case of too.many chiefs and controversial issue, with about claiming that it facilitates a
not enough Indians," meaning half of his constituency for large voter turn-out.
that too many police are in stricter controls and half Bertoia feels that "the citi-
command positions in the de- against. zens of this town don't want it
partment. On the subject of City Coun- - they've voted it down in
"There's a ratio of about one cil decorum, Bertoia had harsh prior elections.
REGENTAL ACTION SOUGHT

.

y -

IMPORTED & DOMESTIC
BEERS & WINES & COCKTAILS

reopening
bases
(Continued from Page t)
cord. It was Turkey's invasion
of Cyprus in 1974 that set in
motion the process that led to
Turkey's denial of U.S. access
to the installations.
PRODDED BY a powerful
pro-Greek lobby angered over
the Turkish invasion, the Con-
gress voted in December 1974
to impose an arms embargo
against Turkey, despite strong
objections of the Ford adminis-
tration.
Both Kissinger and Caglayan-
gil indicated the United States
will be allowed to resume oper-
ations at the installations im-
mediately after Congress ap-
proves the agreement.j
Almost two years after the!
Turks invaded Cyprus, about!
28,000 Turkish troops remain on!
the island, maintaining watch
over the one-third of the na-
tional territory administered by
Turkish Cypriots.
ALTHOUGH there has been'
little progress toward a nego-
tiated settlement, congressional
hostility toward T u r k e y has
e a s e d somewhat, prompting
American officials to believe
that Congress will approve the
base agreement.
The softening of congressional I
attitudes is attributed to the fact!
that the embargo has not pro-
duced a settlement on Cyprus
and instead has cost the United
States the friendship and co-
dperation of a long-time ally.

Bursley traffic perilous

NOW OPEN
SUNDAYS
11:30 a.m. 'til 8 p.m.

NO 8-8987

'r

203 E. WASHINGTON
Between 4th & 5th Ave.

(Continued from Page i)
The proposals included: t
" Adoption of an ordinance
stating that all vehicles must
stop for a University bus which
is loading or unloading passen-
gers.
* P a i n t i n g crosswalks in
front and in back of the point
where the buses stop.
" Erecting a stop sign on
Hubbard near the circular drive
in back of Bursley.
University officials say they
want to look into the situation
and examine the students' sug-
gestions more carefully before
taking any definitive action.
"WE DON'T know if these are
really functional solutions to the
problem," cautioned Associate
Housing Director Peter Ostafin.
"Often, the wrong solution

can create more problems than said. "But when you consider bus stop," a
it actually solves," he warned. the amount of jaywalking and "There are fla
The University Planner's Of- other factors involved, it's real- of safety rules
fice is currently in the process ly fortunate that there haven't both on the pa
of conducting a traffic study to been more injuries." and drivers ali
determine the extent of the
problem. Bursley residents are also! Traffic Engin
grateful that there have been red with thes
"WE'RE ONLY in the inves- no further injuries since the are other pla
tigative stages right now," said January 29 incident. where acciden'

* ...

announcing the
Grcrnd1
Inc.
MEET ROD LAVER & JOHN NEWCOMBE
TUE. MARCH 30th 6:30 - 7:30.
AT THE TENNIS TRAINER WE OFFER SIX INDOOR
PRACTICE COURTS. YOU CAN IMPROVE YOUR f
SERVICE RETURN, BACKHAND, FOREHAND ANDt
VOLLEY. MEET ROD LAVER AND JOHN NEWCOMBE.
HAVE SOME REFRESHMENTS ON US. BRING YOUR
ti RACQUET AND GIVE THE PRACTICE COURTS A TRY ?
ABSOLUTELY FREE.
f*X.t.'1- t'-
A3140 CARPENTER
" ANN AR BOR 971-4310

resident said.
agrant violations
all over campus,
rt of pedestrians
ke," he claimed.
eer Barr concur-
students. "There
ces on campus
ts involving pe-
an even more
'ence. When com-
e areas, North
seem relatively
se in other parts
e said.

Bradford Barr, Traffic Engi-1
neer. "We're trying to see just
how serious the problem is, and
what the danger is of accidents
occurring again at this location.
"From there we can go ahead
and determine what should be
done, but we've got to make a
careful analysis of the situation
first," Barr explained.
A report detailing the results
of the traffic study may be
available within the next few
weeks.
BARR IS also checking with
the Ann Arbor police depart-
ment to pinpoint the exact num-
ber of accidents involving pe-
destrians at the Bursley bus
stop.
"So far, I only know of one
confirmed injury this year," he

"THE WAY those cars come
flying by here sometimes, it's
lucky that no one else has been
hit," commented one resident.
Since hundreds of students
take the bus each day to return
from Central Campus, there is
a high volume of street cross-
ing at the Bursley bus stop. The
opening of the new IM Building
on North Campus is expected
to add to both the pedestrian
and vehicular traffic flow there.
Bursley residents are concerned
that this will make the situation
only more hazardous.
But students recognize that
the problem is not confined to
the Bursley area.
"I'M SURE that the problem
doesn't just exist at this one

destrians are
common occurr
pared to thes
Campus streets
safer than thos
of the city," he

FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
MARTIN,

$3.00

r .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 144
Saturday, March 27, 1976
Is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Publishedda ily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subceription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
ISummer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

BOGEN, and
ARMSTRONG
MUSIC OF THE 30's & 40's
Tazz fiddle, iazz quitar, mandolin, bass
This unicque bond has been the undeni-
able hit of every festival they have been
in. They have backed up Steve Goodman
and iammed with everybody else.. We
have been tryina to stet them for four
vears.
THEY ARE GREAT! DON'T MISS THEM!
1421 HILL 8:30 761-1451

Clt w'cA

Wopv'4A .1 en'ic e4

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)I
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St,
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662.4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and'
11:00 a.m.
Young Adult meals--Sunday,'
12:30 p.m. Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. Sunday: Adult
study.
12:00-1:00 Thursday: Thursday1
Forum (lunch, $1.25).1
Chsanc e l Choir - 7:00-8:301
Thursday.
For more information about
the Young Adult Program calli
Jo Ann Staebler at the church,
662-4466.
* * *

FIRST UNITED METHODIST FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
CHURCH SCIENTIST
State at Huron and Washington 1833 Washtenaw
Worship Services: Sunday Service and Sunday
8:30 a.m.-Communion Serv- School-10:30 a.m.
ice-Chapel. Wednesday Testimony Meet-
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship ing--8:00 p.m.
Service-Sanctuary. Child Care-Sunday, under 2
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Church years.
School. Midweek Informal Worship.
S e r m o n: "Mission Accom- Reading Room-306 E. Lib-
plished" by Dr. Donald B. erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;
Strobe. Sermon six in the series 10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
"The Seven Last Words of days.
Jesus." Service.
WESLEY FOUNDATION NEWS * « *
Sunday, March 28: BETHLEHEM UNITED
5:30 p.m. - Wesley Celebra- CHURCH OF CHRIST
tion followed by dinner and pro- 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
gram in Wesley Lounge. Minister: Orval L. E. WillImann
Wednesday, March 31:'9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
8:00 a.m.-Wesley Communion 10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
in Lounge. 10:00 a.m.-Church School.
4:00-6:00 p.m.-Wesley Coffee Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
in Lounge.
Thursday, April 1: ice. b
7:30 p.m.-Wesley Bible Study, Service broadcast on WNRS
Pine Room. * * *
* * * CANTERB

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
St1pt d lrm

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers

Oruaen.sV VIcome. 9:30 a.m.-Church School.
For information or transpor- 5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
CAMPUS CHAPEL-a place THE NAZARENE
for people 409 N. Division
1236 Washtenaw Ct. M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Pastor: Don Postema Church School-9:45 a.m.
10:15 a.m.-Morning Worship. Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship. Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.

l..i S .l .GID t Z i= *V L'
(Episcopal)
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
Guest-in-Residence-- Rev. Dr.
Jeannette Piccard.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
ISunday Morning Bible Study
at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
at 10:00 p.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
I Saturday-S p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.

All Psychology Undergrads
COME TO A
PARTY

._ ____
1

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