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March 25, 1976 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-25

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Thursday March 25, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Rage aline

Thursday, March 25, 1 97b THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

OUT
OF
_ _ _ BOUNDS
by Rich Lerner
Look u America.. .
...see what- we've got
"THE FACT THAT THE Big Ten alone-and for the first time
-has two teams in the final should convince the people}
around the country that we play pretty good basketball in this
league," said Indiana coach Bobby Knight.
Maybe, just maybe the rest of the country will finally catch
on to the fact that the Atlantic Coast Conference is not the
nation's only basketball league.
"The Big Ten is a hell of a league," said Michigan assistant
coach Bill Frieder. "From top to bottom it's a great conference.
The ACC is overrated. Virginia wins their tournament, and
shoots into the Top Ten, even though they've lost 12 games. Wake
Forest got hot and won two or three straight and they move
into the top five," said Frieder, who told Fordham yesterday that;
if offered the head coaching job there, he would not accept
the bid.
While Michigan and Indiana have both reachedthe final;
four, the ACC representatives in the NCAA tourney, Virginia
and North Carolina, both lost in first-round action. The poll- :
sters may now finally face up to the fact that the Big Ten
is as good if not better than the ACC. "The pollsters mistake
competitiveness for quality," said Johnny Orr.!
This year, the Big Ten's strength was hardly limited to semi-
finalists Michigan and Indiana. Minnesota handed Marquette its
only regular season loss. Illinois and Iowa both beat Western
regional finalist Arizona. Northwestern bested both Oregon State
and NIT champion Kentucky.
Big Ten teams have consistently fared well in the NCAA
tournament. With a current won-loss percentage of 68.1 per cent Daily Photo by PAULINEL
(77-36) the Big Ten ranks just behind the Pac-8's 69.2 per cent, WOLVERINE GUARD Rickey Green drives over I
despite UCLA's 40 wins in its last 41 games. Big Ten teams Scott May in a game played at Crisler Arena Janu
have placed among the top three in the tournament more than Indiana won that game 80-74. Both were unanimous
any other conference. 10 picks and received All-American honors. This ist
Of the top seven teams in tournament action (with at time that two teams from the same conference h
least 10 wins) through the years, three are from the Big Ten. vanced to the NCAA semifinals.
UCLA with a 50-10 record leads the pack, followed by In-
diana, Cincinnati, San Francisco, Ohio State, Duke and Michi-
gan.O PROGRESS REPORTED:
The strength of Big Ten basketball is not a new phenome-I
non. If the pollsters and television networks don't realize the
strength of Big Ten basketball, the pro scouts certainly do. Every
Big Ten school is represented on a professional roster. No other
conference can make that claim. The list of NBA greats that

Phil

the

By JOHN SCHWARTZ
This Saturday, the Michigan Wol-
verines will face yet another of the
fantastic forwards which have graced
college basketball this year.
But the Wolverines won't be up
against the high scoring machine type
player they battled in Adrian Dantley.
Nor will they face Wayman Britt's hot-
handed neuesis Terry Furlow of MSU,
or everybody's All-America Scott May
of Indiana.
BRITT WILL NOT have to battle
Ernie Grunfeld of Tennessee, Eddie
Owens of Nevada-Las Vegas, Dale
Koehler of Wisconsin, South Carolina's
Alex English, and Vanderbilt's Jeff
Fosnes, all formidable regular season
opponents. However, this time the Wol-
verines and Britt will meet Phil Sellers
-Rutgers' All-American.
"Phil The Thrill," as Rutgers fans
have affectionately named him, has
been the main cog in Rutgers' 31-0
season. The 6-5 senior is the team
leader and the Scarlet Knight's perfect
record attests to his leadership ability.
The key to Sellers' success lies in his

Thrill
consistency. This season he averaged
just under 20 points per game while
hauling down an average of 10 rebounds
per contest.
Only three times in his four year
career has he failed to score in double
figures, giving him 2365 points during
the span.
SELLERS CAME to Rutgers from
Thomas Jefferson High School in
Brooklyn, New York. There he was a
consensus prep All-American and Most
Valuable Pplayer in the Dapper Dan
Classic before moving into the college
ranks.
Developing patiently with the Rutgers
program, Sellers has again achieved
national recognition for his basketball
ability.
Rutgers coach Tom Youngs said of
Sellers' development, "Phil was really
undisciplined. He would have tested
anyone back then. Now he is a well
disciplined ball player-the key to our
team."
MICHIGWN COACH Johnny Orr is
likewise aware of Sellers' talent. He
has predicted Sellers will be a first
round NBA draft pick.

I

ills bill
Sellers' all around play warrants
such praise. He has an excellent out-
side shot which compliments his ex-
tremely physical play under the boards
to create a scoring threat from any
area on the court.
"He works hard," noted Orr, "al-
ways moving to get the ball. If he
doesn't get open on one cut he tries
another.
"He's had poor shooting nights, but
he's still been playing good basketball,"
Orr added. "His defense has been
sharp, and he's been rebounding well."
SELLERS, HOWEVER has had a
relatively poor tournament, averaging
only 12 points per game in Rutgers'
three stepping stones to the semi-finals.
Against Connecticut he was almost
completely neutralized, only being able
to muster eight points and five re-
bounds-
But Rutgers fans are hoping "The
Thrill" can break out of the three-game
cold streak that has plagued him in
time for Saturday's game.
At any rate, Wayman Britt will again
face the incredible task of checking
another fantastic forward-Phil Sellers.

Ali cuts Young down to size

!i. E

LUBENS
ndiana's
wary 12.
All-Big
the first
ave ad-

Get Styled

LANDOVER, Md. (P)-Jimmy
Young may be the third-ranked
heavyweight contender, but he
still has a lot to learn from the
champ about how to promote a

s resume

came out of the Big Ten include Fred Brown, Rudy Tomjano-I
vich, Ron Behagen, Jim Brewer, John Havlicek and George Mc-
Ginnis. The Big Ten supplies more players to the professionalI
ranks than any other league.
OURNAMENT TRIVIA-Gene Bartow's record in NCAA tour-
nament play is better than his predecessor John Wooden's.
Bartow's 6-1 slate is good for an .857 rate, while Wooden won 47
and lostl0 , an .825 percentage.
i Three of the four semi-finalists start freshmen in the
center position: Phil Hubbard for Michigan, James Bailey for
Rutgers and David Greenwood of UCLA.
* This is the first time that two unbeaten teams (Indiana
and Rutgers) have reached the final four.
" UCLA has a chance to be the first school to win both the1
Rose Bowl and the NCAA championship in the same year. In
1965, Michigan beat Oregon State in the Rose Bowl 34-7 but lost
to UCLA In the basketball final, 91-80.
" Michigan is the second team to reach the final four andj
play in the Orange Bowl in the same year. Oklahoma lost to
Tennessee 17-0 in the 1939 Orange Bowl and bowed out to cham-
pion Oregon in the semi-finals of the first NCAA basketball tour-
nament.
* The best team Michigan has played in the tournament
thus far? Orr says it's Wichita State.
" The approximate $140,000 Michigan and Indiana bring
home from the tournament gets split 50-50 between the partici-
pating teams and the Big Ten conference.

By The Associated Press : that time, the union's executive owners offered free agent status
board neither accepted nor re- to all major leaguers in the
NEW YORK-Representatives{.
ofteW Major LeaestayIes jected the owners' offer of next two seasons, but tied cer-
Association and the owners March 15, instead calling for tain limitations to the proposal,
A s elation s omiee more talks and the opening of including an eight-club draft of
met or five hours yetmitt e spring training. the players involved.
an attempt to settle their com- The camps were opened the When the union's executive
plicated problems, but no pre- same day by order of Commis- board did not act on the mat-
gress was reported. sioner Bowie Kuhn and yester- ter, the owners withdrew it.
'*L.

fight.
"We can fight together, but
we can't talk together," Young
muttered, obviously over-match-
ed by the constantly interrupt-
ing Muhammad Ali at a news
conference yesterday.
'"We can talk together," Ali
quickly corrected. "That's what
makes a fight."
ALI THEN launched into a
non-stop monologue - with no
rest between sentences-to pro-
mote his April 30 title defense
against Young in the Capital
Centre on the outskirts of Wash-
ington, D.C.
Young, the 27-year-old chal-
lenger from Philadelphia, got
in the first needle only because
he was introduced first, saying
he wanted to "thank the tramp
for giving me a chance to take
his crown."
"I'M TOO old to dance and
jump around," said the 34-year-
old champion. "But I'm going

to talk to you ,and ask you to
show me something.
"I'm so fast, I'll hit you be-.
fore God gets the news. I'll hit
you so hard, I'll jar your kin-
folk in Africa. Look at him,
he's scared to death already."
Asked how Y o un g fared
against him in the exhibition,
Ali said: "He did good. He hit
me twice."

BY

I''t

B Pro

U-Ni Stylists
at the Union

PATHS TO SELF-AWARENESS
a series of lectures-discussions and demonstra-
tions on spiritual awakening.
KARMA YOGA, NATURAL LAW, AND
THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
with DICK AHERN
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 at 8:00 p.m.
at CANTERBURY HOUSE

3
.
1

Afterward, it was announced'
that Marvin Miller, executive
director of the players union,
and John Gaherin, the chief ne-
gotiator for management, would
confer today and set up another:
meeting date, the 33rd in the
series.
Wednesday's session, con-
ducted at Gaherin's office,
dealt with a review and dis-
cussion of all the issues under
negotiations. No new ideas4
were proposed.
It was the first meeting be-
tween the two sides in 10 days
and the first session of any
kind since March 17, when the
Executive Board of the Players
Association met in Florida. At

day's meeting was the tirst ne-
gotiating s e s s i o n since the
camps opened after a 17-day
shutdown.
At the last confrontation be-
tween the two parties, the
management committee had
presented what it called its
"best and final" offer to the
players' group.

Miller and counsel Dick Moss:
represented the Players Asso-
ciation at the latest session.
Present for management were
Gaherin, A me ric an League
President Lee MacPhail and
National League President Chub
Feeney.
George Burns, 1973 Canadian
amateur golf champion, is a
native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and
playing on the PGA golf tour.
He turned professional last
July.

II

.I 'WI!

ri

That proposal recognized
free-agent rights won by
pleyers in arbitration last
cember and subsequently
held in two federal courts.

the
the
De-
up-
The

LAST DAY TO REGISTER
FOR THE
University Housing Council Election
being held
March 29-April 2
There is at least one seat available
in every district.
REGISTER in M.S.A. Offices
3rd Floor, Mich. Union
For Further info, call M.S.A. at 763-3240
or TIM O'NEILL at 764-8860.

BILLBOARD
Anybody interested in be-
coming a student manager for
Michigan's football team dur-
ing this spring and next fall,
contact Robert Brown at 995-
0644 or Coach Tom Reid at
663-2411.
The University of Michigan
skydivers are sponsoring a
free first jump course at 7:00
p.m. in 1042 East Engineering
Building. No experience is
necessary.{
SCORES
NBA
Detroit 130 Kansas City 117
Boston 94, Chicago 87
Philadelphia 118, N.Y. 100
Mdwest's Largest Selection of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
from $259
CALL 769-1776
-,Great Places -
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
RBORLAND-971 -9975
MAPLEVILLAGE-76 1-2733
E.LBRTY-668-9329
EUNVRSITY-662-0354z
SCIENCE FICTION-
FANTASY FESTIVAL
MARCH 15-28
Thousands of books

WHY WALK FURTHER!
L EVI'S BRAND
Available at
Wild's Varsity Shop
FEATURING:
0 Demia Bells 0 Flannel Shirts 9 Panatella
* Brush Denims 0 Denim Jackett Knit Slaks
"Boot Jeans
* Work Shirts 0 Corduroys r Pre-Wash Sloks
Wild's Varsity Shop
311 S. STATE STREET
~ --
Mental Health Research Institute
SEMINAR SERIES
GARY VAN HOESEN
Neuroloaical Unit, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston
"Neuroanatomical Mappinng of Thalamo-
Cortical Region in Primate Brain"
3:45 p.m. Room 1057, MHRI
TEA at 3:15 p.m. in Room 2059, MHRI

L

.J

r

[I.

THE ANCHOR INN
11980 McGregor Rd.

i
}t}Y
1
i

OPENING

..

GO-GO

FRIDAY, MARCH 26th

FOOD

AMUSEMENT ARCADE

ALSO:
Starting April 20-April 24 dance to the live
rock band "STONEBRIDGE" in our Centennial
! Room.
y +rg .yy
+ "^-+" -i+: -hra~c s. .o w .« Acve r .w44 u + I '

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