100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1976 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, MQrch 23, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pa

age Nine

Tuesday, March 23, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pc ige Nine

Djve
By ERNIE DUNBAR
It's hard to imagine a half-miler
dropping three seconds off his best
time in a single season. But Michigan's
Dave Furst finished off, his indoor sea-
son by shattering his personal best
(1:51.0) by running todthe fastest time
in the world for an indoor half-mile at
the Big Ten championships in Wiscon-
sin.
Furst's time of 1:48.6 gave him the
conference title and thoroughly sur-
prised the coaches. "Anytime you drop
three seconds in the half-mile," said
Assistant Track Coach Ron Warhurst
"it's a big drop. You hope to get a
second here and a second there, but
when you go from 1:51 to 1:48.6, that's
a hell of a drop."
It was a perfect setup for Furst at
the Big Ten meet. He went out with

Furst:
Wisconsin's Mike Sang in 53 seconds for
the first quarter. Coming down the
back stretch he moved up on Sang and
then pulled away towards the finish
for the victory.
ALTHOUGH FURST, a sophomore
from Niles, Michigan, had such a large
time drop it seemed like just another
race to him. "It wasn't really any
different race," said Furst. "I might
have been a little more motivated be-
cause I knew I would have great com-
petition, but I didn't treat it as a
special race."
If anyone was skeptical that Furst's
performance was a fluke, Dave remov-
ed all doubts as he blazed to a 1:48.3
in his leg of the two mile relay at the
NCAA indoor championships. That time
gave him the fastest half-mile relay
split indoors in the world this season.
"He's got a terrific amount of natural
ability," said Warhurst. "He can run

First

class runn
21.7 for a 220, which is world class leg they look for s
speed." several events, a
One of the key's in Dave's success is hit a goldmine.
his ability to combine both speed and from the 440, 880,
distance training well. 1000," said War
"I THINK I have a little more speed fect when you're
than most half-milers because I'm able because he's sov
to run pretty good quarter times on the Now that thei
mile relay," said Furst. "But I do Furst has shifte
more distance work than the average early outdoor me
half-miler because I work out with the "I'm pretty co
distance (two and three milers) men. I can run faster
"You have to have a combination of and that's proba
both types of training," said Furst, the outdoor seas
"and this year I fortunately had the Coach Warhurs
___..L _._ L.... ... I L _/C !1 - " a

rer
omeone who can run
nd in Dave Furst they
"He can run anything
, 600, three fourths and
hurst. "He's just per-
looking for a runner
versatile."
indoor season is over,
d his attention to the
ets.
nfident in myself that
than my best (1:52.1),
bly my main goal for'
on," said Furst.
t agrees with his star

NOTICE
Non-Native Speakers of English
All speakers of English as a second language*
are invited to take part in an experimental test
of English Language proficiency to be given at
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL at 7:00 P.M. on
the 30th of MARCH. You will receive $5.00
for approximately 1 1/2 hours of your time. If
interested you must call and register at the fol-
lowing number- 764-2413 or 764-2416.
* No ELI students currently enrolled in the intensive Eng-
lish courses are eligible for the test at this time.

right combination.
Something else that benefits Furst i
the way he approaches running. "He'
very low key and he doesn't get up
tight," said Warhurst. "He doesn'
get all psyched up and let the pressur
affect him before a race."
WHEN COACHES recruit a runner
LAYER, NEWCOA

Dave Furst

half-miler, but is looking for greater
s things. "I think he's capable of 1:45 to
s 1:46 outdoors," said Warhurst. "Based
- on his indoor times, and if he pro-CAREER SEMINAR
t gresses the way I think he will, he
e should be one of the top six half-milers
in the country, and have a definite shot ALTERNATIVES
, at making the U.S. Olympic team."
iCE DUEL TO LAW SCHOOL
Sponsored by
Undergraduate Political Science Association
o battle WILL BE HELD
Tuesday, March 23 at 7:30
"Grand for it, I can be No. 1 again."
Among his string of victories Kuenzel Room, M ich. Union
Aessional came the Davis Cup, which he
total of and Layer won for Australia,__
-- ide"I

Pro

netters

By MB DILLON
Two of the world's leading
tennis players, Rod Laver and
jJohn Newcombe, will be the'
featured stars in the $11,000
Civitan Tennis Classic March'
30 in Crisler Arena at 8 p.m. '
Former Detroit L i o n Ron
Kramer and several other cele-
brities will also participate in
the charity event. Included in!
the Classic are three afternoon
tennis clinics taught by LaverI
and Newcombe at the Liberty
Racquet Club in Ann Arbor.
Any adult purchasing a $30;
patron ticket is eligible for the1
clinic. For $15, children 15 and
under may participate in a
clinic for junior players and
their parents.
The actual tournament will
feature a singles match be-
tween two top-seeded ama-
teurs, a celebrity doubles
match, and conclude with the
Laver - Newcombe s i n g l e sa
match with $7,000 going to the
winner and $4,000 to the loser.I
Rod Laver, tennis' first mil-
lionaire, is one of the greatest
players in the history of the
game. The red-headed lefthand-
er from Australia has swept the
four major world championships
twice-becoming one of only two
- - -~- R--~- - - W S~r~- - T-~ - -

players to complete the
Slam."
After winning 13 pro
championships and a
$203,670 in 1970, Layer

W- VV . , ,-VC _
didn't think in my wildest
dreams that a tennis player
could ever make that much
money from winnings in one
year."
Despite a major back prob-
lem in 1972, which virtually lim-
ited his play to half a year,
Laver still won over $100,000
and was the first player to pull
off three straight yworld cham-
pionships.
Thirty-eight-year-old Laver's
wide assortment of shots, an-
gles, spans and speeds allows
him flexibility, and it is not
a rarity to see him drop the
first two sets of a match and
then come back to destroy his
rival.
Often considered the finest
doubles players in the game to-
day, Newcombe won over $270,-t
000 in 1976, and has captured the
Wimbledon doubles crown four
times.
In a relentless pursuit of ten-
nis' top spot in 1973, Newcombe
said, "I want to prove to my-
serf and to the world that when
I put my mind to it and train
- r --r r'f.w Tw a -"

ROD "THE ROCKET" LAVER, tennis' first millionaire, takes on John Newcombe March 30
in the Civitan Tennis Classic at Crisler Arena. Besides this featured match, there will be a
celebrity doubles match and a singles pairing of two top-seeded amateurs.

anu a wt. i.mu .n ver ten-
nis' tenn-age idol, Bjorn Borg.
A spokesperson from the Lib-
erty Racquet Club said, "A lot
of places have already run out
of tickets. It's really going to
be an exciting match."
Profits from the event will be
donated to the Mental Retarda-
tion Prevention Campaign and
to Special Olympics sponsored
by Civitan International and the
National Association for Retard-
ed Citizens.
Tickets are available at the
U-M AthleticOffice,athe Liberty
Racquet Club, Moe's Sports
Shop, all Hudson's and Grin-
nell's stores, the Peak Sports
Center and most area tennis
clubs.
AFROTC . . . Climb those
letters to success. We offer
scholarships . . . $100 a'
month allowance . . .flying;
opportunities . . . a com-
mission as an Air Force offi-
cer. . . challenging jobs ..- -
plus a great future. The de-
tails are even better. Look
into them. Contact:
AFReTC, North Hall, Phone
764-2403.
MASSACHUSETTS
SUMMER CAMP
OPENINGS
State YMCA Camp
Becket and Chimney
Corners for Girls have
openings for nurses,
small craft specialist,
Dining Room supervisor,
office helpers,cooks,
and Village Directors.
Contact Summer Place-
ment Office for Thurs-
day appointment.

1-
f a tree falls in the forest
and there's no one there,
who are you going to drink
your Cuervo with?

10,

Blue favored over Rutgers;
Michigan tickets all sold out

WiY WALK FURTHER!
LEVI'S BRAND
Available at
Wild's Varsity Shop

i

By BILL STIEG

really get the ball downcourtI

Such is the price of doing well 'fast. They're very similar to us.
Such nin te riichfiing wellAnd they have a first-round
on national television: Mich'- NBA pick in Phil Sellers."
gan is favored to reach t h e BAickiga Pltenters."0
NCAA finials. Just barely, that Michigan's allotment of 1,000
tickets for the Philadelphia
Like most observers, R e n o games were sold out within an
oddsmakers sense a close game hour of going on sale, and the
between the Wolverines and un- coaches have been inundated by
defeated Rutgers, so Michigan calls from those who couldn't
is favored by only a point. The get tickets, well-wishers a n d
same oddsmakers see Indiana media people who are justnow
beating UCLA in the other semi- waking up to the Michigan team
final by six, thus setting up an and would like to join the band-
all-Big Ten championship game. wagon.
Such news was at best mean- Television stations WJBK
ingless to the Michigan (channel 2) and WWJ (channel
coaches and players. At 4) dropped by yesterday to in-
worst, it was the kind of terview the coaches and play-
crazy talk Johnny Orr re- ers, and several newspaper and
fuses to acknowledge. radio reporters had questions
"They've won 31 games," he for the Midwest Regional
said yesterday before his team champs.
went through an informal, un- The coaches are busy with
supervised workout. "They're the myriad details that na-
quick, can board well and can turally go with playing in the
- + -- -

I

national finals - from find-j
ing tickets to deciding what
kind of special clothes t he
team should get for the trip
(leisure suits were preferred
by the players).
Rutgers starts a small, quick
guard, "Fast" Ed Jordan, and a
big, strong guard, Mike Dab-
ney. Their center is a quick
short-blocker named James Bai-
lev. The forwards are all-Amer-
ican Sellers and hot-and-cold'
shooter Hollis Copeland.
Sight Point Institute
is a summer community of
scholars for outstanding stu-
dents interested in literature,
psychology, and philosophy.
The instructional system, like
that at Oxford, is based on
intensive tutorials.
Excellent educational oppor- i
tunities are provided by a
rural setting on the coast of
Nova Scotia. For information,
write to Sight Point Institute,
361 60th Street, Oakland,
CA 94618.

FEATURING:v
" Demin Bells " Flannel Shirts 0 Pa"ate
" Brush Denims " Denim Jacket * Boot J
* Work Shirts " Corduroys " Pre-W
Wild's Varsity Shoe
311 S. STATE STREET

ell*
Slaks
eons
rash Slaks

I

s

I
7

ij

19

itTOES

SDAY, MARCH 23 -

I'.

JULIET OF THE SPIRITS

I

(Federica Fellini, 1965)

AUD. A, 7 only

JOSE CUERVO*TEQUILA. 80 PROOF.
IMPORTED AND BOTTLED BY 03975, HEUBLEIN, INC.. HARTFORD, CONN.

The counter to Fellini's 8-his wife's point of view as he
interprets it. A woman who fears her husband is leaving
her goes through a series of bizarre fantasies, technically
thrillina flashbacks and encounters with the spiritual world,
to arrive at a painful self-realization. Guillietto Mosina,
MarIo Pisu, Sandra Milo. Italian with subtitles.
The Ann Arbor Film Co-op is now accepting mem-
bership applications. Forms available at ticket desk.
. n SF S 5 Q~9 Si

The
Loving Cup:

800 5. ST ATE b r. 761 -5899
Sandwiches - Salads - Omelets - Cheesecake
TRAY CATERING A SPECIALTY
FUTURE WORLD'S presents:
SUSAN BROWNMILLER
author of
"Study on Rape-Against Our Will"
LECTURE TOPIC.'
tE t 1 1 r i

-*1

lllnm

J

Am - AO.Am.
Run-

WWAM-A MMR . J JMML

cooLey's

-TONIGHT-
HAPPY HOUR

IALF-PRICE

was
main
=,a
Non
LIM a
Mum

on
BEER
7:00-11:00
Movies every Mon. & Tues. Nites
HALF PRICE ON ALL DRINKS on
Weds. from 6-8:30.

fir 1 Al 4FU

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan