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March 04, 1976 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1976-03-04

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Thursday, March 4, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page seven

CONFERENCE MEET BEGINS TODAY
High-seeded women cage
Blue tanker s to test Hoosiers face Central in tourname

sl
nt

By RICK MADDOCK
The Michigan men's swimming team
competes today, tomorrow and Satur-
day in the Big Ten swimming champion-
ship at Champaign, Illinois. All the pre-
vious dual meets, conference and other-
wise, mean virtually nothing since only
the results from March 4-6 count in the
final Big Ten standings.
The Indiana Hoosiers are shooting
for their 16th consecutive Big Ten
crown, and the only team which has
an outside chance to stop this dynasty
is Michigan. The Wolverines were
soundly beaten in a dual meet on Jan-
uary 31, 76-47, at Indiana. In that meet,
Ann Arbor's local tankers swam well,
but they were obviously outmanned.
"INDIANA LOOKS superlative," com-
mented Wolverine coach Gus Stager.
"In a championship, swimmers are
allowed three events plus relays, which
helps them that much more."

Stager was referring to Indiana's
depth-amazing compared to any of the
other Big Ten teams.
As for the Wolverines, Stager said,
"We look pretty good. We've been
tapering, so we don't really know where
we are at. Tapering," explained Stager,
"is where you rest up for the meet.
You work real hard about up to ten
days before the meet, then you rest
off."
Although the Wolverines are looking
for a shot at knocking off the Hoosiers,
they better be cautious of a Wisconsin
team that is thinking revenge. Michi
gan's upset over the Badgers (68-55),
on January 9, could be a strong incen-
tive for the Wisconsin tankers.
"WISCONSIN IS swimming about the
same as they have all year," Stager
said. "Their breaststroker took a very
nice drop (reduction in time), but we
are mainly worried about (Brad)
Horner."

"They haven't got the best perform-
ances out of their team since they got
beat by Southern Illinois. That shouldn't
have happened," Stager added. The
Wolverines knocked off Southern I1-
linois 65-48.
"The loss to Southern Illinois can
work two ways," explained Stager. "It
could make them bear down like we
did after our loss to Princeton or it
could make them depressed."
Last year Wisconsin beat out Michi-
gan for the second place notch by a
285-278 margin. Explaining the differ-
ence between last year's situation com-
pared to this year's, Stager said, "Last
year we had to beat them, now they
have to beat us."
AS FOR THE other seven spots to be
filled, predictions are almost impossible.
"A lot of the contengencies with the
other places," Stager concluded, "de-
pends on how Indiana does in the re-

spective events."
If Michigan upsets Indiana or if
Wisconsin knocks off the Wolverines,
the key to the win will probably come
from where the teams place their lead-
ing performers such as Gordon Downie,
Tom Szuba, Alan ' McClatchey and Ric
Peper. This could mean several im-
portant points on the scoreboard.
ANOTHER FACTOR, which is an
intangible, is the performance of un-
heralded swimmers and swimmers who
manage to get second and third place
points in the dual meets. Two Michigan
swimmers who immediately fall under
this category are Joe Bauer and John
Daly.
Of course there are tankers on the
other teams who are in the same
category as Bauer and Daly. Should
two teams be battling for a spot, the
deciding factor would be this type of
swimmer.

{

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By MARCIA KATZ

What better way is there to cap off a
successful 12-4 season, than by winning the
State tournament?
That's what the women's basketball team
will be trying to do in Kalamazoo this week-
end as the SMAIAW tournament begins.
THE SECOND SEEDED Wolverines meet
Central Michigan today in the first round.
Although the Chippewas are an unimpressive
8-10 on the year, they field a strong team.
The top individual on Central is 5'11" sopho-
more center Gina Mazzolina, who has aver-
aged 11 points and 10.5 rebounds.
Central coaches say that Mazzolina can
dominate the lane, if the officials will let
her. In recent games, Mazzolina has gotten
into foul trouble early.
Probably the biggest threat on the Central
squad is 5-2 guard Jackie Neil. Neil is only
averaging 7.8 points a game, but she runs
the fast break well.
Michigan has defeated Central twice this
year. The first time Michigan squeezed out
a 55-54 win in the finals of the Can-Am
tournament in Windsor.
THE WOLVERINES won the second meet-
ing 69-59, but Michigan Coach Carmel Bor-
reds said the victory was not as easy as the
score indicates. "The last game was close
until the last three or four minutes, then we
broke it open," said Borders.
Presently riding a seven game winning
streak, Michigan should have the momentum
on their side. On the other hand, Central
has lost four of their last six games, includ-
ing an 78-56 set back against number one
seeded Western Michigan.

Western, 16-2, fields a veteran team, lead
by top scorer Phyllis Culp. Culp is a fine out-
side shooter, and is capable of scoring 25,or
30 points.
Third ranked Wayne State 17-7 also figures
to be a threat in the ten team tournament.
If Wayne and Michigan are successful in
their opening games, they will face each
other in the second round.
Plagued by injuries and the flue the past
few weeks, the Michigan team will almost
be at full strength this weekend.
SCORING THREAT Carol Klomparens re-
turns to the lineup after missing the last three
games. Guard Colleen Woodbury, who has
been out with an ankle injury, remains n
doubtful starter.
Even with these injuries to the guards,
Borders says the team is much stronger.
She attributes this to the fine play of Jackie
Boyden and Linda Severin who have filled
into starting roles the past few games.
Rounding out the explosive Blue attack are
guards Lydia Sims and Melinda Fertig. In
.last Saturday's 92-50 drubbing of North-
western, in which Sims and Fertig combined
for 57 points, Borders felt the guards played
"super ball and had good timing on the fast
break."
The top three finishers in this tournament
automatically qualify for the Regionals to be
held at Central Michigan.
Borders feels her team is improving every
week and says, "if we play the kind of ball
we're capable of, we could win."
The other teams competing are Eastern
Michigan, Michigan State, Calvin, Grand
Valley, Adrian and Northern.

PREPARE FOR SEASON:
OF
BOND IGolfers travel south
By JIM POWERS ...........I.... :>; Coach Newcomb also stated:
byR Lernerthat "we looked strong in the
While most students are re- ainets." (In the winter the golf-
laxing next week, the Wolverine ers practice hitting balls into
Tourney bound cagers ... golf squad will be in West Palm ~ nets in the clubhouse basement.)
Beach, Florida, striving to ready
S n it' Some of the players also re-
themselves for the coming sea- lated that theywere able to
... third times the charm son. Sixteen players will con-
tend for the six starting spots NIGHT EDITOR the warm weather spell that
DAY SHOULD MARK the fulfillment of a season-long quest by playing 72 qualifying holes SCOTT LEWIS te a ather spellwthk.
I assaulted Ann Arbor last week.
for the Michigan basketball team-a bid to the NCAA chaim- at Cypress Creek Country Club. '%>". " ' "It gave us a tremendous jump
pionship tournament. These six will then represent ment. an the season," Newcomb stated.
It will be the third straight journey to the national tourney for Michigan in the Cape Coral in- Though last year Michigan: Van Tongeren conceded, how-
the Wolverines. The only other time Michigan has gone three vitational during the first week placed fourth in the Big Ten, ever, "It will be tough for us
consecutive years was during the Cazzie Russell era of the mid- in April. That first tournament Newcomb said, "This year's1 since the southern teams (in the
60's, with the Wolverines among the final four two of those, will be a real challenge, with goal is a bid to the NCAA Cham- Cape Coral Invitational) have
years. such highly regarded teams as pionship." To do this the Wol- been able to play all year. But
This trip to the tournament differs from the last two, in as Southern Florida and Duke com- verines would have to finish first we'll give them a real good
Thsti otetunmn ifr rmtels wi speting. orl second in the conference shot."
much as the team feels it has a genuine shot at the title. And that tornsen t
feeling is justified. Both Coach Bill Newcomb tournmwent.' hl

,g.

m:se

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=====3====

Western
powers past
Miami
By United Press International
OXFORD, Ohio - Tom Cut-

I

FEATURING:

ter and Jeff Tyson combined
fnr 1 nitc to leAAC etr

With one regular season game remaining the Wolverines
have posted a total of 20 wins. A win over Northwestern
Saturday will match the 21 regular season victories of the
Cazzie Russell-Bill Buntin team of 1965.
Perhaps the quickest team in the nation, the Wolverinesj
possess an explosive offense. Whether Michigan is running its
half-court offense to chalkboard perfection or running wild on the!
fast break, the Wolverines have penetrated opponents' defenses
so well that at season's end they will shatter the team record
for field goal percentage. At present they are hitting at a 52 per
cent clip, compared to the old record of 47.8 per cent set in 1965-66.
With all five starters averaging in double figures, opponents;
carrot concentrate their defensive efforts on one player, and hope V
to contain the Wolverines.
Michigan shows great patience in its half-court offense.
Always working for a high percentage shot, the Wolverines
rarely force a bad one. And should opposing teams switch into a
zone, Rickey Green, Wayman Britt, Steve Grote and David
Baxter can shoot over it with uncanny accuracy.
Phil Hubbard and John Robinson work the offensive boards
magnificently and carry the offensive show inside. Robinson.
has hit on 25 of 32 field goal attempts in the last four games,
an incredible 78.1 per cent. Last year's Big Ten leader in field
goal percentage, Robinson would rank among the top five
again this year, but hasn't taken enough shots to qualify. !
The Michigan offense does not let up when the starters are'
on the bench. Michigan's depth is one of its strongest suits.
Former UCLA coach Johnny Wooden compares the WolverinesI
favorably with his national championship teams of 1964 and 1965.
Like the Bruins of those years, Michigan unnerves its opponents
with an octupus-like zone press. It is on the defensive end of the'
floor where the Wolverines have improved the most throughout
the season.
Five times Michigan has held its opponent to below 40
per cent from the floor, four of those occasions have come in
the last month. In addition to the zone press and a sticky
man-to-man, Coach Johnny Orr has added a 1-2-2 zone and a
man-to-man press to the Wolverines' defensive arsenal.
The greatest defensive improvement has come from freshman
Hubbard. Early in the year the 6-7 center was burned by several
big men, but lately his defensive work has tightened up con-j
siderably. In the past three weeks he has completely shut offI
Greg Kelser of Michigan State (four points), Purdue's Tom
Scheffler (two points), Rich Adams of Illinois (six points and only
two rebounds) and Iowa's Bruce "Sky" King (nine points).
While Hubbard still has a penchant for foul trouble, the
majority of his fouls are either offensive or are caused by over-
aggressiveness on the boards.
The mainstay of the Wolverine defense is captain Britt.
Always taking on the opponent's top forward, the 6-2 BrittI
frustrates his taller opponents with his defensive cunning.
When Iowa coach Lute Olson says, "I feel there is a very
good chance that two Big Ten teams could reach the final
four; Michigan has the combination of things necessary to go all
the way," believe him. The Wolverines are determined to be
in Philadelphia at the end of March.
What was merely a pipe dream at the start of the season
has condensed into a plausible reality.

and his assistant Jim LUpe
feel that sophomore Doug
Davis, freshman Rod Pafford,
and captain Harv Ely are
leading the race for the varsity
roster. However the other
three positions will be hotly
contested for, with Mitch
Rleznik, Ken Walchuck. Frank
Sims and Tim Van Tongeren,
shining brightest at the mo-
I SCORES II
NBA
Detroit 114, Seattle 110
Philadelphia 123, Boston 110
NHL
New York Rangers 3, Vancouver 3
Detroit 3, Atlanta 2
Montreal 4, California 2
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Richmond 84, William and Mary
78
Western Michigan 73, Miami
(Ohio) 58
Ball State 76, Central Michigan 63
Nebraska 62, Kansas 58
Iowa St 62, Oklahoma 57

Newcouis contidence is D01b4 toIo Ti UI po jnJUIio u s
stered by the large influx of 1A I ) Michigan to a convincing 73-58
new talent, including four fresh- victory last night over Miami
men, and the fact that the Big The Michigan-Michigan State (Ohio), giving the Broncos at
Ten Tournament will be hosted hockey game this Saturday is least a share of their first Mid-
on the University of Michigan sold out. No more tickets can American Conference title in
golf course. "The home course or will be sold for the contest. 25 years. WEE
advantage will really help us," The win also sends Westernj9p
he said. As Walchuck added, If Pete Rose of the Cincinnati TMichigan to the NCAA tourn51
we ever had a chance to win the Reds paced the National League nament.
Big Ten it will be this year." in runs scored in 1975 with 112,h a e n g-
Coach Lipe also felt this team one more than Dave Cash of the Leading only 50-46 with 10
is markedly improved and has PhldlhaPile.miin utreii, Wester
P i a e p i h l i sm i u e re a n n , W s eni a r e l i p o e a n h agth e b e st p y ch o lo g ic a l o u tlo o k M ic h ig a n o u tsc o re d M ia m i 23-12
the estrayholoica ouloo Bill M-adlock of the Chicago to coast to the win.
in years. Cubs led National League hit-
Many of the squad members ters in 1975 with a .354 mark, 22 Cutter, a 6-8 junior center,
feel that Ohio State will be the points more than runnerup Ted led all scorers with 23 points, 5
team to shoot for this season. Simmons of he St. Louis Car- and Tyson, a 6 - 3 southpaw
Perennial powerhouse Indiana dinals. marksman, contributed 16
suffered heavy graduation 1
losses, and only two lettermen
are returning. Ohio State, how- TAK E A BE ET L E
ever, slipped by Michigan in Whatc
the Wolverine Invitational last ON SPRING BR EAK ! Now
fall, and some feel that this NBK under
will just give the starters siblec
"added incentive." work 1
. Thre
the sk
- -rhroos

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