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February 26, 1976 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-26

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Thursday, February 265, 19765

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sever

Th.rsda.Fbur 6 96TEMCIA AL

full court
SPRESS

SEVEN TEAMS RANKED NATIONALLY

Big

Ten

grapplers

battle

at

Iowa

Lloyd Schini

By BOB MILLER
terer Mention sports in the Big Ten, and any fan
will talk about the Ohio States in football and
z__ P I"P- C! h the Indianas in basketball.

* * " tGL/ G a74 7 .'V
. ..
By BILL STIEG
THE CROWD YELLS for him to enter the game. They cheer
when he takes the floor. They holler for him to shoot and
they scream wildly when he scores.
Why is there such a reaction for Michigan's Lloyd Schinner-
er, an end-of-the-bench, roster-filling last-string guard?
The answer is easy. At the risk of sounding trite, the
fans can relate to Schinnerer. Every team has a Lloyd
Schinnerer-that guy who busts his butt for the team every
practice but never gets into a, game until late when the
team has a big lead.
By then the starters are relaxing and joking around on the
bench, and many of the fans are getting ready to leave-gather-
ing their belongings, putting on their coats and not paying much
attention to what's going on on the court. Monday night was
typical. Michigan was leading Illinois by 16 points with about
a minute to play, and many fans had left.
Those who were still watching, though, were yelling for

Too often though, the "major" sports domi-
nate the "minor" teams, in everything from
budgets to publicity. Take, for example, the
Iowa Hawkeyes wrestling squad.
Iowa was ranked number one in the coun-
try until two weeks ago when they were de-
feated by second-ranked Iowa State. But last
week, the Hawks returned the favor to the
Cyclones and returned to the top of the rank-
ings.
PEOPLE IN THE Big Ten are proud of their
football and basketball progams, and deserved-
ly so. They point out that the Big Ten consist-
ently fields teams in the top twenty. But how
many people know that the wrestlers in the
conference constitute one third of the top
twenty in their sport?
Along with Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan State,
Michigan, Northwestern, Minnesota and Purdue
have appeared in the national ratings this sea-
son.
With a field of that caliber, the Big Ten
wrestling championships promise to be a literal
all-star event.

City for matches on February 28-29. Most con-
ference coaches concede that upstaging Iowa
for first place will prove a most difficult task.
Iowa's strength and position as a hometown
favorite lead most people to expect "the" race
to be for second place.
THREE TEAMS HAVE a better than aver-
age shot to place behind the Hawkeyes-Wis-
cousin (13-3, 7-1 in the Big Ten), Michigan
State (7-7 overall, 4-4 in the conference) and
Michigan (16-6, 6-4).
The Spartans record is deceiving because
they are a better team in tournaments than in
dual meets. It only takes a couple high place
finishers to get a lot of points in a tourney.
Last year the order of finish in the Big Ten
meet was Iowa, Wisconsin, MSU and Michigan
with the other teams trailing far behind.
The Wolverines, Coach Johannesen has indi-
cated. will be gunning for the number two posi-
tion. He feels it can be attained, especially
since the Michigan matmen have the factor
of revenge going for them.
To finish second, Michigan would have to
ontnoint the Spartans and Badgers, who both
narrowly beat the Wolverines the last time
they faced each other in dual meets.

First, it crowns one school conference cham-
pion, and it will qualify 36 wrestlers for the
NCAA finals later in March.
The top three finishers in each of the ten
weight classes plus six other "at-large" quali-
fiers will be eligible to participate in Tuscon,
March 10-13.
Coach Johannesen feels that his team has a
shot at individual titles from junior captain
Mark Johnson (177 pounds), with an 8-1-1 con-
ference record, and freshman Mark Churella,
(150) 7-2 in the Big Ten.
Churella will be facing Chuck Yagla of Iowa,
the defending national champ at his weight, for
the third time this year. Each wrestler has one
victory to his credit.
AMOS GOODLOW (126) will have an oppor-
tunity to face Jack Reinwand of Wisconsin.
Reinwand is number two in the country of all
126-pound wrestlers and escaped with one point
victory over Goodlow two weeks ago in Ann Ar-
bor.

The ever-steady Ed Neiswender, honorable
mention All-American Harold King, and Rich
Lubell at 167, 190, and 134 pounds respectively
are other possible candidates with chances of
finishing high in the standings, according to
Johannesen.
Non-Wolverines to look for during the meet!
include: Lee Kemp, (158), out of Wisconsin who
has defeated Yagla; Iowa's Tim Sysewski (134)
a strong performer; and Pat Milkovich, (134)
from MSU, a two time NCAA champion, who
enters the meet with an incredible 24-1 record.
RETURNING FROM last year's conference
meet will be second place finishers Mike Mac-
Arthur (118), Minnesota; Dan Wagemann (167),
Iowa; and Chris Campbell (177), also of Iowa;
Indiana Hoosier Sam Komar will be out to de-
fend his Big Ten title at 134 pounds, probably
the toughest weight class.
Wrestling is popular in Iowa, and sellout
crowds will be expected. These will be two days
when a supposedly "minor" sport will emerge
and be in the limelight.

I

acting coach Bill Frieder to send Schinnerer in the game. Why? e.
Many of the fans are small, somewhat frustrated athletes. They The Conference will send its teams to Iowa THE BIG TEN MEET serves a dual p
can see themselves in Schinnerer.
He's not big-a 6-2 guard. And he's somewhat frustrated, Ccivs edge by Pist ns;
he's been submerged by the recent flood of talented guards
that has hit Michigan (Dave Baxter, Rickey Green and Tom

rpose.

Staton). So the. fans yelled for Lloyd, who Is In his last
year as a Wolverine.
Sonics bounce Braves
"It really surprised me," he said. "I've heard them cheer
before, but never like that. I was nervous." He handled the ball

vvv , - L - .N S.. " A4v u . &A 3U MU LM a
a few times and managed to hit a free throw. The crowd,
already giddy from the big win, cheered as loud as they do for
one of Rickey Green's spectacular moves.
Full of talent and ambition
Hopefully, the yelling isn't sarcastic. Lloyd Schinnerer is a
good player. Those who see him in practice, not just in the last
minutes of runaway games, know he has a good, smooth jump
shot and body control on drives that would surprise more casual
observers. And next to Rickey Green, he may be the fastest
runner on the team.
These talents made him one of the best players in the state
his senior year in Bad Axe. He didn't think he had the potential,
for Big Ten basketball, so he set his sights on Central Michigan.
He "couldn't believe it" when Michigan sent him a letter of
intent. He signed it as soon as he could find a pen.
Now it .is four years later and Schinnerer has scored
fewer points than Green has scored in a single game. He may
be the hardest worker on the team, showing up at practice
as much as an hour early to work out. He has lasted
thriough a broken thumb, a separated shoulder, and a case
of freshman blues that made him want to quit. He knows-
and coach Johnny Orr agrees-that he could be playing a
lot, even starting, for a smaller school.
So what is he doing here? Why didn't he pack up and leave
like so many other players discouraged by a lack of playing
time? It's a matter of ambition. Schinnerer knows he is not
good enough to start for Michigan. He's not looking ahead to
pro ball-all he wants to do after he leaves here is coach.
"The biggest thing for me is that I'm learning a whole lot
about coaching," says the Phys Ed major. "Because of all my
time on the bench, I can watch what moves the coaches make,
and when and why."
Attitude an important factor

By The Associated Press I went ahead 86-75 on a pair of
DETROIT - Seven Cavaliers ; i field goals by Kevin Kunnert
scored in double figures, topped fat the start of the final period.
by Campy Russell's 17 points, White topped Boston scorers
as Cleveland notched a 108-101 > s with 21 points. John Havlicek
NBA victory last night over the n r had 19, Scott 17 and Cowens 16.
Detroit Pistons. Calvin Murphy scored 24
It was the ninth triumph in NIGHT EDITOR: points for Houston. Johnson had
the past 10 games for the Ca- SCOTT LEWIS23 and Newlin 21.
aliers, who firmed their grip 1~. Heinsohn was later ejected
on first place in the Central...from the game.
Division. Detroit, which entered Nate Thurmond 10. Thurmond
the game second in the Midwest, also played a superb defensive -
a half-game behind Milwaukee, game, blocking six shots. ICS C 0 RES
I had a three-game winning Bob Lanier topped the Pis-
streak snapped. tons with 27 points and Curtis~ ~ ~~
Nine of Russell's points Rowe added 21. COLLEGE BASKETBALL
CAME in the final quarter of * * * DePaul 72, Villanova 63
the nlip-and-tuck game, which Brown buoys Clemson 90, Duke 8an 75
wasn't decided until the clos- t Detroit 83, Duquesne 67
ing minutes when Jim Brewer BUFFALO - Fred Brown W. Michigan 73, Kent St. 63
gttosuf o lvln scored 31 points and Tom Bur- Notre Dame 85. Dayton 79
got two stuffs for Cleveland,srd p tsnMat'yland 105 wake Forest 91
and Detroit couldn't get the leson added 29 last night as the,
key rebounds. Seattle Supersonics won their
. Brewer, Jim Cleamons and icghth straiyht game with a,
Austin Carr each scored 14 for 126-94 victory over the Buffalo
Cleveland, while Bobby Smith Srae.
added 13, Jim Chones 12 and Seattle put the game away by, SE
scoring the first 14 points of the .nciIarn
fourth quarter. It gave them a
U UZI ~dAID"' lead of 108-78. ,--_.L___
B~JJ~IaJLBPARJ E

i
I

Doily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
DEMONSTRATING THE LATEST dance step are Michigan wrestler Rich Valley and Ohio
State's Andy DeSabito. DeSabito won this match, a 3-2 decision. The action was part of a
double dual meet in which the Wolverines defe ated both the Buckeyes and the Illinois Fighting
Illini.

V

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L
Put your books aside tonight
and go over to the IM Sports
Building for the 45th Annual
Open House, from 6:30 to 10:00
p.m. The admission price is
unbeatable-free! The main
attractions include the Intra-
m u r a I Championships in
men's, women's and co-rec
basketball and the Residence
Hall vs. Fraternity All-Star
Basketball game. Other events
will take place at Yost Ice
Arena and the Sports Coli-
seum.
At 5:00 p.m., the men's
gymnastic team will have an
exhibition with Schoolcraft
College, with the public in-
vited to attend.

The Braves played the game
under protest because Buffalo
Coach Jack Ramsay claimed
that Seattle was using an ille-
gal zone defense in the second
half.
Bob McAdoo lead all scorers
with 33 points.
* * *t
Celtics edgea
BOSTON - Jo Jo White high-
lighted a Boston comeback with
a key steal and then hit on a
three-point play last night as the
Celtics edged the Houston Rock-
ets 103-102 in a wild NBA game.
Houston, helped by technical
fouls called against Dave Cow-
ens and coach Tommy Hein-
sohn, charged to an 82-75 lead
at the three-quarter mark and

Another reason Schinnerer is here is less easily put into
words. It's the pride he feels being a part of three excellent
teams that have each made the NCAA playoffs. He's an im-
portant part, too, keeping the regulars huffing and puffing!
during practice as a member of the "scout" team, a squad
assembled to simulate Michigan's upcoming opponent. He has
willingly resigned himself to this less visible role.,
"His attitude is superb," says Orr. "He does so many things
to help the team. At practice he really, really works. He never
complains, and just does anything to help the team."
The Big Ten championship two years ago was rewardt
enough for the Lutheran minister's son. It was a thrill he
shared with the "big" names like Campy Russell, C.J,
Kupec and Joe Johnson. It was also a thrill he would never
have experienced at a smaller school. Now, Schinnerer
seems to wear his 'M' letter sweater more often and more
proudly than anyone else.
Schinnerer has that necessary quality for all winners who.
play a team sport-unselfishness. He has kept quiet and worked
hard and now he is looking forward to his third straight NCAA
appearance. Not only does every team have a Lloyd Schinnerer
-every team needs at least one to win.
"I just can't say anything bad about Lloyd Schinnerer,"
says Orr.
"I just can't say anything bad about Michigan," says Schin-
nerer, despite his trials and frustrations.

PRO STANDINGS

MilwauM
Detroit
Kansas
Chicago
Golden
Seattle
Los Ang
Phoenix
Portland
Boston
Buffalo
Philadel
New YO
Clevelam
Washini
Houston
New Orl
Atlanta

NBA
Western Conference
Midwest Division
ee 251
23 3
City 223
184
Pacific Division
State 42 1
312
geles 293
25 3
d 25 35
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
38 1
35Z
phia 342
rk 293
Central Division
Id ~36 2
gton 35
1 ~29 3
leans 26
263

L
34
34
37
40
16
29
31
31
18
25
26
31
24
30
31
33

GB
12
14
16
17y21
5
6
11
1
I
7
9
10 ]

NHL
wales Conference
Norris Division
w L

T Pts

Montreal 44 9 9 97
Los Angeles 30 25 7 67
Pittsburgh 26 25 11 63
Detroit 19 34 8 46
Washington 7 48 8 22
Adams Division
Boston 38 11 10 86
Buffalo 33 18 10 76
Toronto 27 24 11 65
California 23 32 7 53
Campbell Conference
Patrick Division
Philadelphia 38 10 13 89
N. Y. Islanders 32 17 12 76
Atlanta 27 28 9 63
N. Y. Rangers 23 32 6 52
Smythe Division
Chicago 25 19 17 67
Vancouver 25 25 11 61
St. Louis 22 29 9 53
Minnesota 17 40 4 38
Kansas City 12 40 8 32
Yesterday's Results
Toronto 8, Detroit 0
Atlanta 3, Pittsburgh 3
California 6, N. Y. Rangers 4
Montreal at Kansas City, night

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That's the kind of healthy and refreshing
builds championship teams from the inside out.

situation thatI

Yesterday's Results
Cleveland 108, Detroit 101
Seattle 126, Buffalo 94
Boston 103, Houston 102
Washington at N. Orleans, night

Probably not. All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And youYe eating regularly.
But...
But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actually turn that
inflationary spiral around. Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for all of us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves its costing us now for repairs and inefficiency.
Point two. By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see America regaining its
strength in the competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way againwell
all be better off economically.
So you see-the only person who can really

Join The

- ' '"?

WE'RE'
OLD!
CAR RE
IN ANN
With'
NEWt

Dail
THE
EST
NTAL
A RBOR
the
EST

E

NJOY THE FINEST CHINESE
WEST OF NEW YORK ANC
EAST OF SAN FRANCISCC
IN A QUIET ELEGANT SETT
LUNCH 0 DINNER 0 SNACKS @ COC

E FOOD
iNG Ill
KT _L "" u l III~~u

___AM " u

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