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February 26, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-26

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Page Two .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 25, 1975

Poge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, February 26, ~ 976

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EDUCATIONAL CENTER
" TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938"
L B....raUS Cues

Law School faculty dominatedIUdall undespairing County officials kill
entirely by white male Profs. in wake of primary executive proposal

I

(Continued from Page 1)
"I THINK it's interesting,"
stated Murphy bitterly, "that
Harvard was able to lure away
our one black faculty member."
Law School Dean Theodore St.
Antoine explained the school is
doing its part to insure proper
representation. "Of course," he
added "we'd like to have more
minority and women faculty
members."
St. Antoine placed a great
deal of stress on the two women
instructors, Sally Ann Peyton
-TONIGHT-
CHESS-
BRIDGE GAMES
(Bring your own cards/boards)

and Christine Whitman, who are
due to arrive next term.
"IN TERMS of net gain," he
said, referring to Peyton (who
is black), "we have one black
to replace Prof. Edwards, and
we're two women ahead."
St. Antoine said that the Uni-
versity had extended invitations
to black professors, but that the
invitations had been declined.
He added that a woman has
been invited to teach at the
law school on a visiting basis
and that the arrangement "may
be a long-term one."
Murphy maintained that the
problem of law courses oriented
toward women and minorities is
at least as acute as the faculty
issue. "There are hardly any
courses at all dealing with civil
rightslaw or equal opportunity
law - hardly any. And Wayne
State, for example, has six or
- - - - - - - - - - - - -

seven."
THE UNIVERSITY offers only
one law course on minorities
and a single course about wo-
men entitled "Women and the
Law."
The future of "Women and
the Law," however, is current-
ly in doubt. It was formerly
taught by Nordby, and is pres-
ently being taught by Adminis-
trator Rhonda Rivera. But Ri-
vera, too, is leaving the Univer-
sity after this term.
Fowler questioned the ability
of the remaining (all male) fac-
ulty to handle the course from
a proper perspective, "though
some of them have expressed
interest." She said that she
suspects "Women and the Law"
may be dropped from the cur-
riculum for lack of a compe-
teit instructor.
IT'S DANGEROUS
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Cal-
culators are among the porta-
ble electronic devices whose
use on airplane flights usually
is banned for safety reasons.
Calculators caninterfere with
a plane's navigation and com-
munications system, so special
permission from the airline or
pilot is necessary for on-board
use.

Thursday, Feb.
7:30-11 :00 p.m.
at H1-LL E L
1429 HILL ST.

26

(Continued from Page 1) Stearns, two men who brain- By DANA BAUMANN and
was pretty accurate. It will stormed George McGovern's LOIS JOSIMOVICH
greatly help Carter's chance in successful pre-convention stra-
upcoming primaries - espe- tegy four years ago. The County Board of Com-
cially next Tuesday in Massa- missioners Ways and Means
chusetts. THIS THING of backing is Committee tabled yesterday a
invaluable here, but Udall will proposal which would create the
BUT Udall clearly led the face a field of equally solid con- position of an elected county
"other progressive Democrats" tenders on Tuesday. Virtually executive to whom all county
as he has taken to calling Birch all are courting the liberals, departments would be respon-
Bayh, Fred Harris and Sar- Washington Senator Henry sible.
gent Shriver. All three trailed ; Jackson and former Alabama Board Chairwoman Meri Lou
Udall in New Hampshire's pri- Governor George Wallace have Murray (D-Ann Arbor) said the
mary by substantial distances. been concentrating on conser- proposal was tabled pending
U 'g w vative ethnic communities in possible amendment of the 1974
Udall's advantages with Tiber South Boston, East Boston, and Michigan statute allowing for
als showed immediately here. Springfield. reorganization of county govern-
For weeks, college-age volun- Full page newspaper ads pro- ments.
ters - the vital infantry of all claim the key issue in giant
I i b e r a 1 campaigns - had ' type: "Scoop Jackson is against COUNTY citizens rejected a'
trickled into the Cambridge busing." similar proposal in November
Udall headquarters at a rate of WHILE CARTER, too, is ex- 1974. The proposal they voted
two or three a day. Yesterday, pected to score well in South down would have instituted a
staffers said, more than 30 stu- Bestot GorginhSo-hBoard-appointed executive.
dents signed up. ed away from his New Hamp- Commissioners differ on the
Late last night, 1200 people shire strategy, according to a way such an executive should
j a m m e d Harvard's Memor- source in his campaign. be selected.
ial Hall to hear Udall's speech In place of his generally mod- Murray, who favors an ap-
on the evils of corporate power.p erate, down-home tone, Carter piinted administrator over an
Over 100 had to be turned erte swimthng Ct a elected one, claimed the latter
away. re puruitis switch ingtoacwoud"just cerate another level
away tie pusui ofthe liberal vote of the bureaucracy without any
, here. indication that it would bring in
HE GUEST list Udats Even Jackson is making a! a professional."
hastily planned cocktail party bid for the liberal vote. His
was a political and intellectual workers have widely circulated "THAT PERSON would be the
jewel box. Besides Sargent, an endorsement from former- most powerful person in Wash-
who still has pull with Demo- North Carolina Senator Sam tenaw County," she added, and
crats here, there was political Ervin - "to offset our Cox's if elected "would have the pow-
Scientist Graham Allison and endorsement" said Ed Peter- er to veto over the Board."
Historian Richard Neustadt. son, Udall's coordinator in the Murray also opposes the elect-
Former Watergate Prosecutor Eighth Congressional District. ed position on the grounds that
Archibald Cox, whose endorse- it would cost more than an
ment has bolstered the Udall AT A PRESS conference ear- appointee, since, "the first thingI
campaign here, was invited but ;ier yesterday, Udall urged the that would happen would be that
did not arrive. Another no- "progressive candidates to coa- he (the elected executive) would
show was house Majority Lead- lesce and unite around one get a professional to run his of-
er Thomas (Tip) O'Neil (D.- man." While Harris' poor New fice."t
Mass.), who lately has thrown Hampshire showing may spell She then cited Oakland Coun-
his energy behind Udall also. his doom, Bayh's campaign' ty-the first Michigan county to
The candidate chatted with here shows no willingness to elect an executive-as having
Joe Grandmaison and Rick give up early.
!z_.-7 7 f

"constant hassling w it h the
county executive."
COMMISSIONER Tilden Stum
bo (D-Ypsilanti), who intr
duced t h e proposal to th
Board, said the public shoul
decide whether the executive
would be elected or appointed.
"I think the people of the
county are not ignorant," he
said. "They are capable of vot-
ing in a qualiifed person."
Stumbo added that he had no
doubt of the need for a full-
time county supervisor. "Some-
where, somehow, the County
needs a captain of the ship."
THE 15 ELECTED Commis-
sioners only serve part-time and
there are over 40 professional
departments which they must
oversee.
According to Stumbo, "A goo
executive could certainly con
solidate various department
and make a more efficien
county government, which woul
save enough money to pay for
his own office."
One of the major problems in-
volved in the proposal is that,
according to the current statute,
the proposition would appear on
the ballot at the same timea
names of candidates running
for the executive office.
"YOU MAY have a person
running for an office which may
not exist, or with which the
may not agree," said Murray.
At present, stated Murray, the
Board has "no idea" whether
the state statute will be amend-
ed-or, if it is, whether enoug
support can be gathered among
commissioners to put the ex
ecutive proposal on the ballo
again.
0 0

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TEACH-IN on
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THE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND POLITICAL
ASPECTS OF THE CONFLICT
MODERATOR:
Benjamin Hourani Phd. pol. sci. (EMU)
SPEAKERS:
10:30: HALLM BARAKAT Phd. Soc. (U. of Texas)
1:15: GEORGE SALIBI Phd. Islamic lit. (Harvard U.)
2:45: FAWAZ TURKI Palestinian author
4:15: PANEL DISCUSSION
Soonsored by the Oroanization of Arab Students
U.M. Chapter
SATURDAY, FEB. 28
MODERN LANGUAGES BUILDING--AUD. 3

(Troup taudis Mruss

(Continued from Page 1)
and he couldn't be in two places
at once.
In an interview, Struss spoke
of the film Coquette, starring
Mary Pickford. He says that she
was rather demanding in the
kinds of shots she wanted used
in the filming, since she was too
old for the role and would have
been scarcely credible.
Struss then developed a three-,
camera technique which blurred
her lines and made her look
young enough for the part. The
result was that she won an,
Academy Award for her per-
formance, though Struss wasn't
recognized at all.

promising future
oue w gon.

BUT HIS acumen didn't go
unnoticed in the film colony.
le received the very first cine-
matographic Academy Award
ever presented, and v a r i o u s
other citations culminating in
the award presented last night.
Struss says that he has no
regrets about his life and work.
When asked about the turbulent
fifties in Hollywood and the ef-
fect it had on his work, his wife
Ethel spoke for him. "Of course
Mr. Struss and I were horrified
at the persecutions, but then we
never really paid any attention
to it." An artist, he has eyes
only for his work.

(Continued from Page 1)
said in a statement which ran
throughout her address and was
reiterated in different phrases.
ATKINSON'S speech was de-
livered with a highly sarcastic
and cynical flavor which drew
repeated applause and laughter
from the crowd.
After reaffirming her declara-
tion that women "must create
our own system," Atkinson
stressed the importance of a
new system of justice as "an
alternative to the male judicial
system."
"There is no justice anymore
-laws- but no justice," she
added.
Atkinson broke with NOW in
1968 to lead the more radical
anti-marriage anti-family fac-
tion of the feminist movement.
ATKINSON said she feels theI
feminist movement is on the
upswing again after a tempo-
rary demise.
"Women are starting to get
back in the streets," she said.
"We're regaining our feet and

I

"NON-MATERIAL
LIMITS TO GROWTH"
a lecture by futurist
HAZEL HENDERSON

our own ground."
She added that it is importan
for women to realize that issue
such as fair housing costs, foo
prices and utility rates a'
"feminist issues because o
the existence of certain minim
needs to survive in today's, so-
ciety.
THE CO-FOUNDER of NOW
also stressed the necessity to
share ideas with other women
in order to "broaden the move
ment."
Atkinson reminded the crowd
that in alliances, "It is impor
tant to let things that bother
you get in the open. You mus
keep the air clean-it's ye
important to be successful o
else the whole thing blows."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 126
Thursday, February 26, 1976
Is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562, second class postagc
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a il y Tuesday throug
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