100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


hursday, February 19, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

---- _.

cientists slam
uclear plants

ASHINGTON (Reuter) - A
clear scientist who quit the
n e r a 1 Electric Company
EC) in a dispute over reactor
zards said today many of the
mic-driven power plants in
United States failed to meet
eral safety standards. and
d be closed.
ale Bridenbaugh told the
gressional Joint A t o m i c
ergy Committee that techni-
flaws in the commercial nu-
ar power system, which now
races 57 operating reactors,
ied the potential for catas-
he.
RIDENBAUGH was joined
two other former GEC nu-
ar scientists who said they
d also quit on February 2 be-
use of the way nuclear reactor
fety problems were being
ndled by the company.
The former project -manager
r a GEC safety system used in
out 20 reactor plants, said
mly a militaristic type" of
rvision could assure their
ety.
e said he did not accuse
'C of negligence or wrong-
ng but blamed the situation
a rush to get -more nuclear
ts into use for generating
ctricity.
regory Minor said the three
them quit "because we could,
longer justify devoting our
's energy to the continued
elopment and expansion of
clear fission power-a sys-
we believe to be so dan-
rous that it now threatens the
ry existence of life on this
net "1
'WE HAVE come very close.
some serious accidents in this
ustry," he added.3
ast amounts of plutonium
re being prduced, Minor said,
.ving "a radioactive legacy
our children r and grand-1
|dren for hundreds of thou-
ds of years."-
third scientist, Richardt
b -b a r d, said government'
Id begin an inspection pro-4
m of the older nuclear power
ts and other plants should

not be made radioactive until
all safety problems were solved.
THE THREE MEN, who work-
ed at GEC's Nuclear Energy
Division, said they became con-
cerned last July at the way in
which the company and the 16
utilities it served were dealing
with a safety problem that could
arise if a reactor lost its coolant
system.
They said their concern was
directed at the "containment"
safety system which would be
relied upon to prevent a serious
nuclear accident if the cooling
system failed.
They said the system was
used in about 20 GEC reactors
operated for various utilities.
BRIDENBAUGH said only
one reactor-in Vermont-shad
been shut down because of con-
cern over the containment prob-
lem but others might have sim-
ilar hazards.
He challenged a statement last
month by the Nuclear Regula-
tory Commission which claimed
that there was no problem with
any other reactors because they
were made differently.
"That is not true," Briden-
baugh said.
Their explanation of why they
came to doubt the safety of
nuclear power plants was heard
politely, if not at time skepti-
cally, by the committee, which
exercises strong control over
U.S. nuclear policy.
"YOU ARE scientists," said
the chairman, Democrat Senator
John Pastore. "You knew when
you started that radiation kills
people."
He also pressed the three wit-
nesses on whether there had
ever been a single death attri-
butable to a' nuclear accident.
"We are not here to argue
whether deaths have occurred in
the past," Bridenbaugh replied.'
"We are concerned with techni-
cal flaws in the system and the
vast potential this has for the
future."

U. S. EMBASSY CHECKED
Soviets hit radiation charge,
MOSCOW (P) - The Soviet A SECRET MEETING of ment, possibly caused or ag-
Union yesterday took up the embassy personnel was called gravated by high levels of So-
question of radiation reported for early in February, then can- viet microwaves beamed at the
at the American Embassy in celed, but later small groups of embassy was published in the
Moscow, dismissing it as ordi- embassy members were briefed United States. The embassy
nary electromagnetic activity about the subject. termed the story inaccurate
normal for a large city and not and misleading and said the
hazardous to health. On Feb. 10 a meeting of the ambassador was not undergo-
American community in Mos- ing medical treatment.
The government newspaper cow was called at the em-
Izvestia called Western news bassy to give assurance that Izvestia's version of the ra-
reports about a dangerous lev- there was no radiation hazard diation was this:
el of radioactivity as "lies ... on the "ground floor" of the
trumped up from beginning to embassy - implying that there "It is common knowledge
end." It declared they were might be a hazard on the up- that industrial enterprises,
aimed at undermining Soviet- per floors where the office of transportation facilities, tele-
U. S unersandng.Ambassador Walter Stoessel vision and radio installations,
U. S. understanding. and other securi areasar etc. have a certain effect on
I A oin ted. A State Deparmentthe environment, particularly
IZVESTIA also said a joint A t Departmen big cities and industrial cen-
check had been made by Rus- medical technician was dis-inb
sianand Americn technicins- patched here to check blood ters . . . a certain electromag-
sian nd American technicians amples of embassy staff mem- netic field may develop in the
yemis- functioning of radio and tele-
sions were within "the mini- berionvision stations, other means of
mum sanitary health standards A report saying that Stoessel communication and some In-
j existing in the Soviet Union." had a mysterious blood ail- dustrial enterprises.

The U. S. Embassy was ac-
cused of being the main source
of "misinformation," w h i c h
Izvestia said was "sensation-
alized" by the U. S. press. It
called the story an "invention
with a foul smell" that "began
oozing."

"BEST FILM

r

I

OF THEYEAR"
MTIONAL BOARD OF REVWA~'

AP

One toke over the line

The embassy refused to com-
ment on the Izvestia story, or
to confirm or deny that So-
Photo viet technicians had been work-
ing with Americans in checking
radioactivity.
f the News reports emerged nearly
ward- two weeks ago indicating that
the embassy was concerned
| about radiation believed caused
y by Soviet bugging devices.

All those who pride themselves on smoking prowess, take note. Paul Mears, winner o
University of Winnipeg's annual cigar-smoking contest, is shown here puffing on an a
winning 35 stogies. Mears' prodigious lungs earned him a new world record.

Alabama D.A. reveals
food stamp abuses
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. P) -1 county, state and federal offi-
"When a district attorney, like cials Tuesday while he pointed
myself, can walk into a store to stacks of beer and cigarettes
and buy beer and cigarettes he said were brought in the last
with food stamps it is a pretty 16 days in the county with food
good example of the giant ripoff stamps.

Join The Dail

Sexuality

& Special
A WORKSHOP

People-

STANLEY I JBRICK
AN O'NEALwMAR5A'BERNS0?O
®Q " Wom Wos A WA aComr.JnosnwCoumap"
l!0k h. ovWICef AT BRIARWOOD
ADJACENT TO J.C.PENNEY 0769-07800 1-94 & S.STATE ANN ARBOR'
Showtimes: 10:45, 3:45; 8:00

DR. MATT TRIPPE-Facilitator
Friday, Feb. 20 at 1:30

A.B.C. room
Washtenaw Intermediate
School District
1819 S. Wagner Rd.
Ann Arbor

U.M.C.E.C.
sponsored
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Info: 763-2374

-

1

the American taxpayers are
getting."

THE STAMPS are supposed to
be limited to the purchase of

That's what Madison County food.
Dist. Atty. Fred Simpson told Simpson said that 28 stores
were involved.

S s S-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The head of the Department
of Agriculture for eight states,
Andres Hornsby of Atlanta, said
the department likely will dis-
qualify the stores from taking
part in the food stamp pro-

19

he Daily Official Bulletin is an
idal publication of the Uni-
rsity of Michigan. Notices
ould be sent in TYPEWRIT-
FORM to 409 E. Jefferson,
fore 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ng publication and by 2 t
Friday for Saturday and
nday. Items appear only once.
dent organization notices are
t accepted for publication.
r mote information, phone
4-927.
Thursday, February 19
Calendar
ON: Johathan Kozol, author,
h At An Early Age, "Alternate
of Education," 9:50 am 11:30
r. Human Growth, Develop-1
t: The Ascent of Man: Harvest
he Seasons, And. 4, MLB, 11!
r. Japanese Studies: Frank
er, Weoster College, "Constitu-
ai Theorists in Japan Today:
Listens to Them?" Commons
Lane Hall, noon.
ndleton Arts Ctr.. Open,
th - Adelaide Suits, "Dances
Music of the Pacific," Pendle-
Rm., Union, noon.
blic Health-Films: A Tree Let-
Word for Love; About Sex,!
sPH I ;, 12:10 pm.
havorial Science: Harold Stev-
Sn, "Child Development," Lec.
1, MLB, 3:30 pm.
I: Roy Rappaport, "On the
ture of Ritual," 1057 MHRl.
pm.
,Mineralogy: F. Wiliam
ray, MSU, "Deformation and
ite Emplacement in Donnegal
tern Ireland)," 1528 CC Lit-.
cal Studies. Nicholas Hors-
University College, U. of Lon-
"*octus Sermones Utriusque
uae?" 2009 Angell, 4:10 pm.
ronomy: Robert F. Garrison,
Dunlap Obs., Richmond Hill,
o, "Title to be Announced,"
Col~oq. Rm., 4:30 pm.
'1 Night: Provincial French'
League Cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm.
School Speakers Committee:
Drader, former Dehoco In-,
Judy Bagid, atty., "women
son," Law~yer's Club Lounge,
School, 7:30 pm.
ild House. Dan Fouke, Steph-
erry-poetry reading, 802 Mon-
7:30 pim.
emi stry: R. Boeckman, Wayne
", "

State, "Studies Directed Towards
the Total Synthesi of Antibiotics,"
1300 Chem., 8 pm.
PTP: Davis' Purlie, Power, 8 pm.
Music School: varsity Band, Hill
Aud., 8 pm; piano dept. recital, Re-
cital Hall, 8 pm.
WUOM: It's Up to You - Clas-
sical music request, call 763-9210;
763-1550, 8:05 pm.
UAC Ars Comedia: "The Time of
Your Life 7/6 of a Play" collection
of 4 1-act comedies, Mendelssohn,
8.15 pm.
Residential College: Roadside At-
tractions, "Twas Brillig," evening!
of mask, Aud., R. C., 8:30 pm.
General Notices:
Course Mart Deadline: Proposals
for Fall 1976 Course Mart offerings
must be submitted to 2501 LSA by
Feb. 20; proposals welcome from
anyone with expertise in academic
area not now covered by LSA cur-
riculum.

Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Columbia Gas System, Ohio. An-
nounces a summer program for stu-
dents having completed their jun-
for year in geology, elec., and
chem., engr., details available.
Interviews: Camp Sequoia, New
York. Will interview Mon. Feb. 23
from 9 to 5. Openings include wat-!
erfront (WSI), pioneering, nature,
music, drama, dance, photography,r
ham radio, arts/crafts. " Age 19.
Lakeside Farm Camp/Watervliet.
MI / Coed, Girls. Will interviews
Thurs. Feb. 26 from 10 to 5. Spe-
cialists fields open, maintenance, '
cooks, riding, arts / crafts, couple,
with farm experience. Details avail-
able.
Irish Hills G. S. Council, MI. Will
interview Thurs. Feb. 26 from 9 to,
5. Openings include counselors, spe-
cialists, driver, other fields. Regis-
ter.

grams.
"EVERY consideration will be
given to the stores if they did
not knowingly violate the law,"
he said.
Simpson said, "I am giving
notice to the freeloaders and
deadheads on the welfare sys-
tem in Madison County that they
better get honest or go to jail."
' Hornsby said Simpson's in-
vestigation is the only <'ne of
its kind by a local official that
he has heard of.
Summer Roundtrip
NEW YORK
to LONDON
$265
MUST RESERVE 65 DAYS
IN ADVANCE
Call TOLL FREE
9 to 9
(800) 847-7196
NOVA CHARTER CORP.
ITHACA, NEW YORKj

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup and Sandwich, 50c
REV. ROBERT HAUERT
Office of Ethics and Religion, Univ. of Mich.:
"CAN AN URBAN ANGLO MALE
BE A NATURAL PERSON?"
Friday, February 20
GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe
NELLY KAPLAN'S 1970
A VERY CURIOUS GIRL
A French feminist fantasy of love and revenge.
Kaplan's first feature tells of a poor and op-
pressed woman who frees herself by selling the
sexual favors she formerly gave away. Her pub-
lic revenge on the hypocritical townspeople is
one of the funniest scores in cinema.
FRI.: Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, &
James Stewart in THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
CINEMA Gl!D Tngh t OD RH. AUD

y Because Precision
Is Usually.
Expensive ...
INTRODUCING-
NOVUS 4520
(scientist)
INCLUDES-
*;oRPM /X X
* FULL TRIG & LOG
FUNCTIONS
" MEMORY
- RECHARGEABLE
:::...:. N O ' 2 5

I

I

L w 1J

Why Not Work For'
The GARGOYLE?
Come to the MASS MEETING
THURSDAY-7:30

2nd Floor
Student Publications

Building

What Kind of People Sign Up for a UAC Computer Date?

I

A RADICAL FEMINIST SPEAKS OUT:
"In a free society, you cannot have the
family, marriage, sex, or love,"
TI-GRACE ATKINSON
Another in a series of speakers in honor
of International Women's Year
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25th
POWER CENTER-8 P.M.

1

TICKETS $2.00-on sale now at UAC
Ticket Central, Hill Aud. Box Office;
Power Center Box Office Feb. 25th.

yes YEAR
Puni

----- - ......m -m - um m m
A "MUST READ"
7I
FOR ALL
- LAW SCHOOL.
CANDIDATE
- BARRON'S HOW TO
o PREPARE FOR THE
.1 LSAT
Experts for many years in
developing test preparation
books, we deliver the com-
plete material you need for
success on the LSAT.
LSAT Examination Dates:
December 6th, 1975 April 10th, 1976
February 7th, 1976 July 24th, 1976
Barron's How to Prepare for the Law School Admission Test,
created by specialists in the fields of law and testing, provides
review and practice in all areas of the LSAT examination.
It includes complete study in reading comprehension, data
interpretation, logic, principles and cases, grammatical es-
sentials, and principles of effective writing. This solid founda-
tion prepares you for any-
usto-yeappearing on____ j
the actual exam. Three mod-re
el examinations comparable SaRR : '
to the LSAT help you ascer- FOR THE LAW SCHOOL"y 3
r taro your strengths and ADiSSiONTEST '*
remedy your weaknesses. L"S
* ADDED FEATURE: .. 3
A uide to Law Schools-
47pages of concise --
descriptions on over
140 approved American
taw schools.3
Barron'sHow to Prepare
Admission Test
provides you with a firm
base for confidence when
taking the LSAT. ,-. -
-- -

11

ENJOY THE FINEST Ch
WEST OF NEW YO
EAST OF SAN FRA
IN A QUIET ELEGAN
LUNCH 0 DINNER 0 SNACKS

1
KINDESE FOOD
RK AND I - lll , IIIIIII
NCISCO
T SETTING
S t COCK TAILS
"7 I.II IV III

FOUR

THE FIJI'S HAVE NO IDEA .. .
PI ( Ar MA fDIELTA FRATERITY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan