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January 09, 1976 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-09

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 9,1976

100 DEAD IN CIVIL WAR:
Beirut fighting heats up

BEIRUT, Lebanon (P) - Leb-
anon's civil war, heated up by
large-scale Palestinian involve-
ment, left more than 100 per-
sons dead and at least eight
kidnaped yesterday, officials
said.
A pall of black smoke hung
over Beirut as hundreds of ter-
rified residents fled from neigh-
borhoods involved in house-to-
house fighting.
THE FIERCE new clashes
spurred talk in Christian circles
of partition - splitting Leba-
non into separate Christian and
Moslem states.
Syria reportedly has threat-
ened to intervene and even an-
nex Lebanon to prevent such a
split. Israel has warned it would
retaliate the minute Syria mov-
ed in militarily.
"Gunmen from both sides
screamed in agony as they are
left to bleed to death because
ambulances are turned back at
gunpoint by both sides," a po-
lice spokesman said of the Bei-
rut fighting.
BEIRUT Radio appealed ur-

gently for blood donors through-
out the day, while two hospi-
tals were damaged by shelling.
A huge fire at a large re-
frigeration plant in the eastern
industrial area of Beirut raged
uncontrolled because firemen
were unable to approach
through the heavy fighting.
Beirut Radio appealed to the
combatants to let the firemen
through. The fire might spread
to a neighboring bottled gas
warehouse and set off an explo-
sion that would wreck havoc to
adjacent factories - "a disas-
trous blow to the national econ-
omy," the radio warned.
A SCORE of smaller fires
raged in other scattered points,
most of them caused by heavy
rocket and mortar fire.
The fiercest fighting raged for
the second straight day between
Palestinian guerrillas and Chris-
tian militiamen surrounding
Palestinian refugee camps on
high ground on the northeastern
outskirts of the city.
The fighting around the
camps at Tel Zaatar and Jisr

el-Basha erupted Tuesday night refugee camps is so great at
after Christian militiamen re- times "you cannot hear your-
fused to allow food convoys to self talk," said one combatant
reach the 27,000 refugees in on the scene.
and around the camps. The most formidable weapon
Tused by the Palestinians was a
THIS LED to the collapse of battery of antiaircraft guns on
a shaky two-week Christmas high ground, with which they
holiday cease - fire. It also re- blasted Christian neighborhoods
sulted in the most serious in- below.
volvement to date by moderate The Christian militiamen re-
Palestinian guerrillas in the 9 taliated with rocket, mortar and
month-old civil war. heavy machine gun fire. They
The fighting is over Moslem also used five homemade ar-
demands for political and eco- mored cars in the fray.
nomic reforms and Christian re- The collapse of the cease-fire
luctance to grant them until the around Tel Zaatar spread to
government clamps down on the most other areas of Beirut by
Palestinian guerrillas, nightfall. Many of the sandbag
The Palestinians, aided by street barricades and fortifica-
left-wing Moslem Lebanese gun- tions that had been dismantled
men, were trying. to punch in the last two weeks were has-
through the Christian residen- tily re-erected. Police reported
tial areas surrounding the two heavy exchanges of fire in most
camps to break the food block- Beirut areas where Christian
ade. and Moslem neighborhoods abut
THE DIN of battle around the each other.
Frat fire leaves 2
dead at Ohio State'

Italian
workers
s trik
ROME (R') - A million work-
ers staged strikes throughout
Italy yesterday to back de-
mands for new civil service con-
tracts, underscoring the eco-
nomic unrest that lies behind
the country's new government
crisis,
The protest, planned before
Christian Democratic Premier
Aldo Moro's government 'fell
Wednesday night, brought state-
ments from labor leaders that
the crisis could increase the
gravity of the economic situa-
tion. The government lists 700,-
000 jobless out of a work force
of 19.8 million, but industry
sources estimate unemployment
to be twice that figure.
"OUR UNIFIED strategy isn't
changing and can't change, not
even in the face of a grave
political crisis," labor leader
Bruno Storti told a crowd of
banner-carrying strikers in
Rome after a march by thous-
ands from the Colosseum to Pi-
azza San Giovanni.
jThe strike was called by 200,-
000 civil servants, but workers
from most industries joined in
a show of sympathy and protest
ranging from 10 minutes to 24
hours.
The walkout closed most gov-
ernment offices and some
schools, delayed rail and air
traffic, and paralyzed Rome's
international airport at Fiumi-
cio.
UNION leaders, calling for a
speedy solution to the govern-
ment crisis, said the political
vacuum could jeopardize key
meetings scheduled next week
to) resolve the closure of the
Leyland Innocenti Auto Coi-
pany in Milan, shut down by
the British parent company
with 4,500 persons put out of
work.

FRI. - SAT. - SUN.

Jan. 9, 10, 11-$3.00
ED TRICKETT
GORDON BOK
ANN MUIR
for the 7th year in a row,
The Ark's winter season is
joyfully opened with Ed
k Trickett and friends . . . this
time the friends include the
legendary Gordon Bok.

/1

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17
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COLUMBUS, Ohio (A) -
Flames swept through an Ohio
State University fraternity
house early yesterday as pledg-
es cleaned up after an initiation
ceremony. Two students were
killed, fire officials said.
Nineteen other members of
the coeducational fraternity, Al-
pha Rho Chi, escaped the burn-
ing three-story structure into
snow and temperatures in the
teens. Six occupants leaped
from a second - floor window,
witnesses said.
"IT WAS horrible," said Jeff
Yocca, a student who lives at
a nearby fraternity house and
rushed to the burning building
to help.
FIREMEN SAID two students
were injured in the blaze, one
critically. Six firemen were
slightly injured.

Fraternity President John Be-
hal, who was in the house when
the fire started, declined to dis-
cuss the fire.
One of the dead students was
identified as James Nelson
M i t c h e 11, 20, of Washing-
ton, Pa., who was asleep on the
second floor. A 22-year-old wo-
man student, whose name has
not yet been released, was
found in an upstairs hallway
where she was apparently over-
come by heat and smoke while'
trying to wake others in the fra-
ternity house.
Mark F. Heinz, 18, of Toledo,
was in critical condition at the-
University Hospital with severe
burns over more than half of
'his body. Dana Kent Moessner,
18, of Columbus was treated at
a hospital and released.

AP Photo
Ape or man?
This is Oliver, a creature who may be Ameri a's own homegrown answer to the legendary
Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas. Baldh ded but otherwise exceedingly hairy, he be-
longs to Marhathtn attorney Michael Miller. filer claims he picked up the pointy-eared,
four-foot-six beast for a measly $8,000, from a 2 animal act somewhere in upstate New York.
He plns to put the amiable Oliver, who some'im-s n'lls no a chair and warbles from his
seat when he sees peonle sitting and talking, lhromih tests in order to determine whether he
is an ape or more closely related to man. Oli 'er weighs abort 120 owinds, and likes to
munch on fruits, vegetables, cheese and non'at'y me-ts, according to his owner.

1421 HILL

8:30 p.m.

761-1451

- i
218 api~copat . iueut oloron
wtu arbor, Mihar t1818'tdephone 665-0606
-a center for contemporary spiritual expression and
inauiry at the University of Michigan.
SPONSORING IN THE WINTER TERM, 1976 MAJOR
PROGRAMS IN THESE AREAS:
MINISTRY FOR EPISCOPAL STUDENTS
Counseling on personal and spiritual, matters Sunday.
Liturgv each week at oon followed by the common
meal and fellowship.
STUDIES ON CARL JUNG
On-going Jung study group bi-weekly. Workshops,
films and other events scheduled over the term.
HEALING
Monthly discussions on the connections among the
healina of body, mind, soul, and community.
THE CATHOLIC WORKER
Focusing on the ideas and lifestyles of the Catholic
Worker Movement and the writings of Dorothy Day and
Peter Maurin. "Clarification of Thought" discussions
periodically.
GAYNESS AND SPIRITUALITY
Weekly conversations among people of all spiritual
paths who relate positively to gayness-Each Sunday at
3:00 p.m.
BREAD FOR LIFE
Proarams scheduled over the term to keep the world
food crisis in mind and to formulate a personal response
to our abundance in the face of mass starvation.
IMAGES OF THE HOLY
A series of original cultural events designed to give a
musical, dramatic and artistic voice to the spirit.
THE SEED PLOT
A scattering of brief courses in the. Free University
tradition, to plant ideas in the cracks of your educa-
tion and designed to germinate in your future. Scheduled
over the Winter Term.
MORE IDEAS ARE WELCOME
Canterbury House will sponsor additional programs as
ideas and issues emerge during the year. Your ideas

1

DAILY OFFICIAL BI

H EY--WHAT'S
HAPPENING
THIS WEEKEND?
Square Dancing
Friday night
,a Want to come?

Friday, January 9
Day Calendar
WUOM: John Ciardi, "In and Out
of the Dictionary," 10:05 am.
Hockey: UM vs. Minnesota-Du-
iuth, Yost Ice Arena. 7:30 pm.
Music School: Encores from In-
terlochen -- featuring SM faculty

memn.bers, Rackham Aud., 8 pm; de-
gree recitals - Donna Whited, or-
gan, Hill Aud., 8 pm; Willard Pear-
swn, trumpet, Recital Hall, 8 pm..
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SA B, 764-7156
If you want a job or plan to at-
tend graduate / professional school

1 -*i -
-J 00 _

. i
M
t
,i
j 1

No major political meetings
I ~ I Nw re held but party leaders
U L LE TI Nekis
Communists, Italy's second lar-
make an appointment to visit with Cosmunits.
reps on-campus; interviewing at gent party.
CP&P: Jan. 20; Orbach's Inc., Jan. Moro's 13-month-old govern-
21; Prudential Life, Jan. 22; So. ment was composed of Christ-
Methodist Univ/Law; Cargill, & U.
of Toledo/Law. ian Democrats, the dominant
____________party since the war but slipping
Retired jockey Walter Blum in recent elections, and the
rode thoroughbreds that earned tiny Republican party. The coa-
more than $26 million in 22 lition party withdrew its parlia-
years of riding. mentary backing, claiming the
Moro government ignored their
Senior Greg Schneider of Rock economic proposals and their
Islander, Ill., captains the Air demands that Communists be
Force A c a d e m y basketball given a hearing in shaping gov
team. ernment policy.
- - -
ARE YOU COLOR BLIND?
If so, we need your participation
paid vision experiments
CALL
764-0574
or come to
VISION LAB
Rm. 5080-- KRESGE 11

-.--

i

SOUARE DANCE-OPEN HOUSE
FRIDAY, JAN. 9 8-11 P.M. 75c
University Reformed Church
(Huron at Fletcher)

II ' ~-ea turing~- 1
Zuni & Navajo Jewelry * Hand NtWoven Clothing o
* Leather Jackets * Blankets * Mayan & Aztec Art
Reproduced as Hand-Enameled Brass Plaquesa
~ .'I' (/ £I Imports and Crafts
-Jle clheren from the Americas
309 E. LIBERTY 995-4222
E 11-8 MON.-THUR.; 11-9 FRI., SAT. 0,

0

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