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February 17, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-17

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.Tuesday, February 17, 1976

rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

'Page Seven

Tuesday, February 17, 1976 FHE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

.

This year's winter
fools forecasters

'Home movies' mar festival

WASHINGTON (A) - QueerI
things are happening with high1
altitude winds, and while the
National Wither Service isn't;
sure why, it thinks this mayj
have something to do with this
winter's unusual weather.hh
The weather service says pre-
liminary indications are that the
current season is breaking a
pattern of generally mild win-
ters the United States enjoyed
for four years.
"WE HAD a pattern of warm-
ing and stayed with it when we,
put out a forecast for this win-1
ter," said Donald Gilman, chief]
of the weather service's Long
Range Prediction Group.
"And, frankly, it's not work-
ing too well."
Gilman said the 11 wintersE
before- 1971-72 were not as warmj
as the ones that followed and'
in those 11 winters it was colder.
than normal in the East.
"MY GUESS is that we'll end
up this winter with it warmer;
than normal in the West and ;
cooler in the East," he said yes-
terday in an interview.
Gilman said the warm Decem-
ber and cold January this time
were so different that it's hard
to put together a total picture
of the current season to see if
the country is returning to the
colder pattern of the 1960s.
The meteorologist said pat-
terns of high altitude air circu-
lation, -which brings in weather,
"are usually quite consistent for
similar winters." Patterns for
the 1960s were similar, as were
the ones for the warmer win-
ters of the early 1970s.
"THE PATTERN we've had ,
this winter looks a lot like last
year, but there are some unex-
plained differences," G i l m a n
said. "The winds are following
their typical west to east mean-
dering course, but they are
swinging wider over the Pacific
than before.
"Maybe the temperatures of
the waters is affecting them,
but we just don't know."
Gilman said winds coming
from the Pacific, Alaska and

the Canadian
the greatest
weather in
United States.

northwest have
influence upon
the continental

"CALIFORNIA is having a dry3
winter and circulation patterns
are consistent with that," he
said. "They are of such a na-
ture astodeflect storms to the
north and away from California.
"There is concern in parts of
the Great Plains where the soil
is dry and there is blowing in
areas that have been running
a 1 to 1% inch deficit in rain-
fall since Dec. 1. They've been
lacking snow cover to protect
the ground.
"The circulation pattern is
consistent with the lack of rain-
fall," Gilman said, adding that
moisture is moving on both
sides of the dry area but for
some reason not settling in.
Richard Felch, who heads the
weather service section putting
out crop bulletins, said winter
wheat crops are taking a beat-
ing in the warm, dry, blowing
areas.
"But if the area cools again
and gets moisture in March',
much of the crop could be
saved," Felch said.
TELEPHONIC
UNDERTAKING
WASHINGTON P-Suspicion
replaced necessity as the moth-,
er of invention of the first dial
telephone.
Almon Brown Stowger, an un-
dertaker in Kansas City, Mo.,
suspedted that local telephone
operators were switching calls I
to his competitor. So, according|
to Intellectual Property Owners,
a nonprofit organization dedi-
cated to the preservation of ourt
patent system, he invented a
system to complete calls with-z
out an operator.

(Continued from Page 5) i
in the Ann Arbor 16mm filml
festival. In both films, the star
is asked to recall an autobio-
graphical event: Greenwald's
version is better.
Likewise, there were a num-I
ber of interesting films that
contained good ideas but were
poorly executed. A film inter-
pretation of Playboy-Penthouse]
sex advice columns entitled
Drop Us a Line should have
been much funnier and sexier.:
The Matthew P. Ventimiglia
Story concerned a prepubescent
day-dreamer who miraculously ,
lives out his astronomical fan-
tasies. It's a good premise, with '

lots of references to Star Trek judges picked Sunday's pro-
and 2001, but the story lacked gram, which', if enough interest
continuity and came to no con- is generated, may go on na-
clusion. tional tour.
A FEW OTHER films, like Local support for tie festival
James Nartker's The Thresher- has grown steadily since its be-
men, drew deserved boos for ginnings in the late '60s, but
their trite, purposeless documen- what it really needs is support
tary style. The best technical from its filmmaking entrants.
achievements - Mike Haller's The films will have to display
Palace of Fine Arts and Tony more of the artists' intentions
Phillips' Inertia - were mired than mere fooling around be-
in totally abstract, boring fore one can take them seri-
themes. ously.
Total prize money of $1,000
was distributed among several Detroit racetrack was built in
films, so no big winner was 1950 and is 16 miles from down-
determined. A panel of four town Detroit.

Fefresher
course.

HUGE BLOCKS of ice broken apart by warm ing temperatur
River in the wake of heavy rains, creating this unusual-lookin
The town, as well as others in southern Michigan, has been i
heavy snows started melting last week.

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
es floated .down the Raisin

I
I

Keep fresh ir* .sidecar

KEEP FRESH AIR
INSIDE CAR

accidents. The National Auto-
mobile Club advises motorists
r.,.,,. ' A - - f , Irnr nn inrd

>!

I

the ann 0arbo0fit

w.,..........

TONIGHT-Tue

THE PASSION
Ingmar Bergman, 1970)

After working with a collar
?ox, pencil and hatpins, he de-
veloped the "Stowger Switch"
nd obtained a patent in 1891
rom the U.S. patent office for{
n "automatic telephone ex-
hange." The first such system
vas installed in 1892 at Lai
>orte, Ind., with subscribers.1
NI II
sday, Feb. 17
4 OF ANNA
AND. A-7 & 9
and flow of spirit in
island. A most beau-
ery grays and browns,
ens highlighted occa-
red. Liv Ullman, Bibi
ow, Erland Josehson.
LL HALL-$1.25
ut's DOINEL TRILOGY

LOS ANGELES UP) - Carbon to avoid driving 1ortong periUUs
monoxide in the low levels thai of time in heavy traffic and to
are often found in the passenger keep f r e s h air circulating
compartment of a car can nar- through the car on open roads.
row the driver's field of vision,
slow down his action time and
decrease his ability to concen-
trate.
Even these small amounts of
carbon monoxide can be lethal
because they can cause seriousQ ,. 0
\ n
you
see
news
If you want to help
happenith the Date Match
happen Gidiocy, there wilt be a
meeting for volunteer
Calworkers tonight, Tues-
day at 7:00 at UAC, c
76-DAILY $J 2nd floor Mich. Union.
V________ For More Ino Call 763-1107 /

g pile-up in Monroe yesterday.
n danger of flooding since the
gp0
ST4
. Y
013 SST
O TOTAE
WITH HEA A TJSSED
~ BAKED P siNG
SALAD PESN
3035 Washtenaw
across from lee Oldsmobile

From one beer lover to another.
THE STROH BREWERY COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48226

"

Bergman studies the ebb
four people living on an
tiful film in tawny, wint
deep blacks and dark gre
sionally by splashes of r
Andersson, Max von Syd
Swedish with subtitles.
In AUD. A, ANGEL
WEDS. & THURS.: Truffa

f"AI G. SPEAKERS

I

. o&0 w0 o xg J
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--j

01976 Colfornio Avocado Advisory Boad, Newport Beach, CIaifor a
Well send you a free booklet on Avocado Seed Growing
if you'lfsend us 25 for handling and postage. Address it:
Seed Growing, P.O. Box 2162, Costa Mesa, CA 92626.
Allow 4-6 wks for delivery. Offer expires Dec. 31, 1976.
iU3 IIE EuEDV

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