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February 10, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-10

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Tuesday, February 10, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage .Seven

Tuesday1 February 10, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Page Seven

No

letdown

for

Michigan!

Buckeyes

crushed,

9

T__ "ftA - " TRT Tti AT.T

By TOM CAMERON point lead in the first six and r{=1 .1-1
Special To The Daily a half minutes of the game,
COLUMBUS - The Michigan and then Wayman Britt re-
basketball team rebounded from sponded each time the Buck-
a heartbreaking loss at Indiana eyes threatened to close the A
on Saturday to crush Ohio State, gap thereafter. S p o rts r
90-66 at St. John's Arena last Britt scored 14 points in the
night. first half, including a four-point NIGHT EDITOR:
"They forced us to run," ad- play which established a 14 BILL STIEG
mitted OSU's 18-year coach point lead. The half ended with .:.".
Fred Taylor, "and we just the Wolverines ahead 44-34. "
couldn't run that quick. They 'Eight seconds into the second to take a commanding 22 point
have such super speed. I really half Phil Hubbard sat down lead
can't remember an team in the hi ur su du t Ohio State never threatened
Big Ten as quick as they are." witheafter the Michigan outburst.
B T atya Wolverines exploded with 16 The closest the Buckeyes ever
Michigan pulled out to a 12 points in a three minute stretch came was 20 points.
D7 b k "After a loss like that on
Bo nlill g hackSaturday," coach Johnny Orr
MICHIGAN OHIO STATE said, "we were happy with
FICGFN FGIO STTE F sthe way we played. I don't
FG FT R F Pts FG FT R F Pts think I've ever been so down
Britt 9-14 2-2 3 2 20 Daugherty 7-17 0-0 7 0 14 myself after a loss . . . We
Robinson 6-12 1-2 10 4 13 Poole 2-7 0-0 0 3 came back very well tonight."
Hubbard 2-11 0-0 13 4 4 Taylor 5-14 0-1 9 1 10
Grote 6-8 0-0 5 3 12 Bayless 7-13 0-1 3 4 14 Rickey Green led Michigan
Green 11-21 1-1 9 3 23 wood 7-14 2-2 4 1 16 scorers once again with 23
Baxter 2-5 0-0 2 1 4 Cline 4-13 0-0 9 2 8 points, and once again his speed'
Hardy 2-5 0-0 4 1 4 Shields 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Bergen 4-5 0-0 4 1 8 Bolden 01 0-0 0'1 0 was impressive.
Staton 0-1 0-0 0 0 0 Hammond 0-1 0-0 1 2 0 "Green really accelerates,"'
Thompson 1-1 0-0 0 0 2 Smith 0-3 0-0 2 .0 0 said Taylor. "He even acceler-
Schinnerer 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Romano 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 ates well dribbling. There's just
Team 6 Lucas 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 no way to play head-on with
TOTALS 43-83 4-6 56 19 90 Burris 0-0 0-0 0 0 0: him. You need two guys on each
SCORE BY PERIODS Team 4 side (of him)."i
MICHIGAN 44 46 90 TOTALS 32-83 2-4 39 15 66 Britt finished the game with

15, and Steve Grote 12. Hubbard
scored only four points playing
in front of his homestate fans.
Jud Wood led Ohio State
with 16 points. Craig Taylor,
who scored 31 in Ann Arbor,j
scored only 10 while playing
with a severely injured back.
Michigan was not only too!
quick for Ohio, but also too
strong on the boards. Michigan,
led by Hubbard's 13 rebounds,
picked off 17 more caroms than
Ohio State. The Wolverines also
blocked six Buck shots, includ-
ing two by Hubbard, two by
Robinson, one by Bergen, and
one by Green.
Green looked more like a for-
ward when he blocked OSU for-'
ward Mike Daugherty's jump
shot and played more like a
forward when he collected nine{
rebounds. j

0-66
end with a back as bad as
his," Taylor said.
The Wolverines firmly estab-
lished themselves in second
place with this win as Michigan
State lost o Indiana. Michigan
now holds a 9-3 Big Ten record,
two games ahead of the Spar-
tans.
Michigan will travel to play
the Spartans in East Lansing
this weekend.

mew

Big Ten
Standings

..

z:4

1
3
l
1
1
1
i
5

i

AP Photo
TOM STATON, ONE OF Michigan's many super subs, guards Ohio State's Mark Bayless dur-
ing last night's big Michigan win. Staton and his fellow bench-sitting s t a r s give Michigan
depth few teams can match.

The Wolverines finished with:
the Buckeyes by outshootingI
them 51.8 per cent to 38.5 per
cent. "It was the shots that
were taken," Taylor comment-
ed. "Michigan took their shots
underneath. We were 20 feet,
out."
Coach Taylor was surprised
that his center, Craig Taylor,
would even play this past
weekend "No one else could
have played the whole week

Conf.
W L
Indiana 11 0
MICHIGAN 9 3
Michigan State 7 S
Purdue 7 4
Iowa S 5
Illinois S 7
Northwestern 4 8
Minnesota 4 7
Ohio State 2 9
Wisconsin 2 10

All
W L
20 0
15 S
11 '10
12 9
14 6
12 9
9 12
12 7
6 13
8 12

Ohio State 34 32

661

Att.--9007

full court
P R ESS

PADDLERS GRAB STATE TITLES:
Locals place

I 20 points, Johnny Robinson had1
ti

Last night's results
MICHIGAN 90, Ohio State 66
Indiana 85, Michigan St. 70
Illinois 7, Wisconsin 59
Purdue 86, Northwestern 58

well in

Johnny's Wolverines

. 0

l
t
I
4

00 too much talent?

By ANDY GLAZER?
T HE MICHIGAN WOLVERINES have once again proven that
they have too much talent for the likes of an also-ran like
Ohio State.
Unfortunately, they may also have too much talent for their
own good. There were questions in the stands and the press box,
as to why the Wolverines didn't substitute more and earlier.
Now, there are coaches who would give their left arm
to be able to have such problems. In fact, Johnny Orr used

By MARCIA M
The hot and st
Building paddleball
alive with pinpoint
suicide maneuvers 1
as Michigan hoste
Paddleball Tournan
the eight champio
Arbor's Elyse Ja
Louwsma, Dick Pitc
Pudduck won three.
The tournament
ized by Mark Wils
Martin, Susan .lKo
Louwsma for mem
National Paddleball
About 160P eople rr

to be one of them. That may be part of the problem.-I tries.
Consider the past two season of Michigan basketball. Two ---- --
years ago the Wolverines were a sterling 22-5. They started a -
team of Campy Russell, C. J. Kupec, Wayman Britt, Joe John- YanIS
son, and Steve Grote. The only substitute to play with some- U~L i.
thing approaching regularity was freshman Lionel Worrell, who
transferred to Oral Roberts after that first season. All other S o
substitutions were made out of either dire necessity or sym- IC t
pathy for the opposition.
Last year the Wolverines again sparkled, finishing 19-8.
John Robinson took over for Campy, and David Baxter was a By The Associate
reliable replacement at guard. But beyond Baxter there was no INNSBRUCK -l
one that Orr could turn to with confidence. ace Gustavo Thoen
way down a washb
Now the Wolverines are enjoying another fine season and took the lead
But following one of the best recruiting years by any team slalom at the Wint
in the country, Johnny Orr has (depending on your source) yesterday, Russia's
anywhere from eight to ten solid ball players. Baxter, Joel lakova was stripped
Thompson, Alan Hardy, Tom Bergen, and Tom Staton are medal because she
as talented a group as sits on any Big Ten bench. drops for a cold an
There is the problem. They are sitting. Not all are happy ican couple won a 1
in that situation. al in ice dancing.
"We proved it against Iowa," said Bergen, who hit three /
straight buckets last night to start a game-breaking 16-2 Michigan Oc
burst in the second half. "The subs came in and won the game. -
"Tonight they took me out with six minutes to go (Michigan America's Philip
was leading 80-54 at the time). They said I was tired. Well, I've ished fourth behind
seen games where Phil (Hubbard) was tired, and he stayed in. the first run of
"Don't get me wrong," continued Bergen, "Phil is a better slalom. Swiss ski
ball player than me. I'm not looking to start. But I think I've Good and Hei H
done the job enough to be playing some more. and final run of ti
Michigan assistant coach Bill Frieder had some views on the today.
subject. Olympic oficials
"In the first half," said Frieder, "we went to the bench took away Kulakova
when we had foul trouble, or when we weren't playing very the five-kilometer c
well. In the second half, we played well, and you just don't race. She had take
change things when they're going well-especially on the drops unaware they
road. the illegal drug eph
"You have to think about the team. As nice as it would be to
make some people happier by playing them earlier, you can't
afford to lose control of the game you have more or less won."'-,
Michigan captain Wavman Britt, who as a four year starter
knows as much about Michigan basketball as anyone, had a
more "middle of the road" view.
"We have more deth than we've had other years, and coachn
Orr is definitely substituting more than he used to. But he
likes to play the best guys, and you can't blame him for that. He
stresses conditioning, and we're probably in better shape than
anyone else in the league."!
Taking an overview, you can't arevie with Orr's success. Ile
has taken teams that no one exnected to go anywhere and twice
taken them to the NCAA. This year's team was full of ques-
tion marks before the season started. You don't see many now.
On the other hand, it is difficult to tell a talented ball-
nlayer like Tom Bergen (or others that are less vocal) that
he must wait. Bt as difficult as that may be, it must be done.
It is Johnny Orr's job to win, and he's doing it.
"It's my team," said Orr, "and we'll substitute when I feelI
like substituting."
You're a winner, Johnny Orr, and no one ever argues with
a winner. I think the move should be made sometime-but I also
think there is no one who knows better than you when it shouldM
be made.

ERKER. STEVE K E E L E Y, a San won the last three national pad-
tuffy Sports Diego racquetball professional, dleball singles championships
courts came defeated Williamston's D i c k which he entered. Born in Jack-
t shots and Jury in order to take the Open son, Michigan, Keeley earned
ast weekend Singles first place. The match a degree in veterinary medicine
d the State: was won in two games, 21-11,1 from MSU but has yet to prac-
ment. Out of 21-20, the second an amazing tice it as he favors his racquet-
nships, Ann come-from-behind effort. ball career.
cob, Grace Jury was up 18-6 and serving! JURY GOT his revenge in
her and Ron in game two when he turned Open Doubles, when he and R.P.
. to the gallery and made a com- Valenciano, c u r r e n t national
was organ- ical remark about his lead. doubles chamipons, downed Kee-
on, Preston Evidently the laughter broke ley and Len Baldori, 21-19, 21-8.
rnfield and Jury's concentration because he Ann Arbor's Greg Grambeau
bers of the immediately lost his service and and Bob Streken finished third,
Association. several consecutive points. by taking two from an East
nade 220 en-! Keeley, the singles favorite' Lansing pair, John Scheppele
before the tournament began, and Gary Croskey.
- --Jacob and Louwsma defeated
Kathy Williams and Susan Hal-
sey in the Women's Doubles
1411. I i- ii e 1Championship. Williams, from
win Btonz; e
i! 1 Hazel Park, is a professional
racquetball player who toured
with Keeley and is rated about
o ses n third in the nation in that sport.
Ann Arbor females prevailed
in Women's Singles as four
d Press "It was such a small amount hometown women participated
Italian ski it seemed almost an injustice," in t r o p h y winning brackets.
i fought his said the president of the IOC Judy Shirley, who has played
oard slope Medical Commission Prince paddleball for only two years,
in the giant Alexandre de Merode of Bel- placed second to Plymouth's
er Olympics gium. "However, if we are to Teri Davis in three games. Lou-
Galina Ku- have a medical commission and wsma finished fourthand Karen
of a bronze rules, we must enforce them." Harding and Suzanne Ris fought
took n o s e Flu and colds have hit many for the consolation prize.
d an Amer- athletes. . Ann Arborites also predomi-
bronze med- In ice dancing, Ludmilla nated the Senior Division, age
Pakhomova and Alexander 35 and 45. Pudduck and Pitcher
Gorshkov won the gold medal won the doubles, outscoring
S 6f for the Soviet Union. Another their opponents from Flint, Lou
Colleen O'Connon and James
Mahre fin- Millns of the U.S. took the C 0 e
dThoeni in Soviet couple was second and r S O E

ourney
Giampetroni and David Jaffes,
21-8, 21-20. Third place doubles
came to Don Johnston and Rod
Grambeau by default.
IN SENIOR Singles, Pudduck
won the title, humiliating Mid-
land's Larry Piper, 21-0, 21-13.
Ann Arbor's Johnston took a
third by default in this cham-
pionship, too.
The remaining division, Mas-
ters, is designed for males 4S to
55. Before the switch this season
to the Senior Division, Masters
was for men 40 years and up.
The winners this weekend were
Al Hosner from Kalazamoo in
singles and Lou Hephuis and
Max Krinien from East Lansing
in doubles.
In March, the National Pad-
dleball Singles Tournament is
in Adrian. Ann Arbor represent-+
atives should be seeded near the
top as they placed highly this,
weekend in one of the country's
best tournaments. The doubles
are planned for April in Flint.
The Top 20 '
By The Associated Press

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1. Indiana (63)
2. Marquette
3. N rth Carolina
4. Maryland
5 Rutgers (1)
6. UCLA
7. Nev-Las Vegas
8. Tennessee
9. Washington
10. Notre Dame
11. Alabama
12. N. C. State
13. Cincinnati
14. Missouri
15 w. Michigan
16. MICHIGAN
17. St. John's
18. Virginia Tech
19. Centenary
(tie) . Texas St.

19-0
18-1
18-2
17-3
19-0
17-3
23-1
18-2
18-2
14.4
15-3
16-4
17-3
18-3
18-0
14-5
17-3
18-3
20-3
16-2

1,278
1,093
980
772
756
601
398
4741
423
332
206
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143
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89
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57
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the giant
iers Ernst
emmi were
The second
he event is
reluctantly
's medal in
ross-country
n the 'tose
y contamed
edrine.

bronze.
In men's skating, Great Brit-
ain's John Curry took a clearI
lead with only the freestyle
events to go.
East Germany's Ulrich Weh-I
ling became only the 13th per-.
son in the 52-year history of the
Games to defend a gold medal
victory as he won the Nordicl
combined event which includes
ski jumping and cross country.

S-----------
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Tennessee 73, Vanderbilt 59
Georgia 86, Kentucky 81
Memphis St. 111, N. Texas St. 93
Dayton 93, W Kentucky 82
Notre Dame 95, St. Bonaventure 80
Detroit 93, Buffalo 81
Rutgers 110, Delaware 87
Alabama 79, Florida 73
Mississippi St. 75, Auburn 74
Oral Roberts 72, St. Louis 69
NBA
Houston 105, Kansas City 86

-

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