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February 10, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-02-10

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Page Two

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 1 ' 1976

Page Two Il-IL MI(..HICiAN L)AILY Tuesday, February 1 1976

3 S i

COME AND TALK WITH
CONGRESSMAN
Jim O'Hara
Democratic Candidate
for U.S. Senate
Thursday, Feb. 12
Kuenzel Room
Michigan Union
3 p.m.-free refreshments
Sponsored by Students for O'Hara, College Younq Demo-
crats. Paid for by: O'Hara for Senate Committee., Doris
K. Bayer, treasurer.
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CH ELSEA FLOWER SHOP
203 E. LIBERTY

Souped-up vans
dazzle spectators

MPLA

Prof blasts 'careless critics'
of proposed DNA research

(Continued from Page 1)
fur bed, plush carpeting, sharp
woodwork, velvet interior, a
Citizen's Band radio and a
quadrophonic stereo system.
Provenzano is especially
proud of the van's "pearl"
paint job. "You have no idea
how beautiful this is," he gush-,
ed, apologizing for the van's
need of a wash.
John Raymond, a three-time
van owner from Saline, entered
j his deep blue "fun vehicle" to
c-i

the mall show. Resplendent inj
lush brown and blue shag car-
peting and gold velvet curtains,
the van comes equipped with a
bed, table, tape deck, AM-FM
stereo and a refrigerator.
"I'VE GOT a '75 car and that
van does better than my car in
mileage," said Raymond.
However, he is planning to
sell the van and buy a new one
with a revamped "floor plan."
"There are a lot of things you
can change," he explained.

'warsson comes to
town; raises $1,200

(Continued from Page 1)
"THE PROSECUTION was
guilty of misconduct from the
start," he added.
Harold Norris, a Detroit Col-I
lege of Law professor who at-
tended th Swainson fund raiser,
spoke of the former governor
and elaborated on Kohl's re-
marks. "(Prosecutor Robert)
Ozer had it out for Swainson
even before the grand jury met.
He (Ozer) said, 'We have an air
tight case against Justice Swain-
son'."
Ozer presumed the former
governor was guilty before the
trial, Norris said.
Swainson, rubbing his eyes
and showing fatigue, said, "This
is just the beginning of this or-
deal and I say it has been an
ordeal. . . The charges are er-
roneous and the government's
methods reprehensible."
MANY OF the people attend-
ing the "Defense Party" share
Swainson's convictions that he
was framed by Republicans who
feared that the 50 year old for-

mer governor would capture
Hart's slot in the Senate.
"I think Ozer's motifs were
political," Swainson said. "I
think it went all the way up to
(former Attorney General) John
Mitchell."
Amongst the 100-odd guests
circulating in Brazer's smoke
filled home were State Rept.
Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor),
Mayor Albert Wheeler, Sheriff
Fred Postill, C o u n t y Board
of Commissioners Chairwoman
Meri Lou Murray, Councilwo-
man Liz Keogh (D-First Ward),
Councilman Jamie Kenworthy
(D-Fourth Ward) and former
Councilman Norris Thomas.
KOHL SAID that he will file
a brief for the appeal in 60 to 90
days. The brief will be filed in
the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of
Appeals. While that appeal is
pending Swainson said he will
continue to find his visit to "the
other side of the bench very en-
lightening."

captures
Angolan
city
T Continued from Page 1)
THE MPLA, which has near-
ly completed its sweep of north-
ern Angola, is now concentrat-
ing on the central part of the
country and its strategic, cross-
country Benguelatrailroad. It is
threatening Silva Porto, UN-
ITA's military headquarters,
and Luso, farther eastward on
the roalroad.
Both Zambia and Zaire, which
support UNITA and the FNLA
respectively, need the railroad
for the copper trade and have
suffered economically because
of the loss of the railroad link
to the Atlantic.
Some Western observers be-
lieve tthe MPLA simply may
isolate Lobito, Angola's m a i n
port and the terminus of the
railroad with nearby Benguela,
if it can take Silva Porto and
Luso.
IN LONDON, Prime Minister
Harold Wilson told Parliament
that many Britons, aparely
mercenaries, have been killed
in "warlike operations" in An-
gola, and that reports that 13
or 14 were executed by their
comrades for refusing to fight
apoear to be true.
The executions were said t
have occurred in nor hern An-
zola last week on orders of a
Greek-born mercenary named
"Col Callan," who sin, _ has
been reported slain, either b
other mercenaries o FNLA
agents.
Wilson said "from l the facts
available, it appears probable
that tragic incidents including
the loss of life of a number of
recruited mercenaries h a v e
taken place."
AATU,
decries
Housing
(Continued from Page1)
"If anybody's going to be ex-
empted," she said, "it should
be those students who are least
able to compete in Ann Arbor's
atrocious housing market. If
those students happen to be
football players, that's fine."
But football players are usual-
ly on scholarships anyway, Kel-
ler claims, and can afford to
live off campus.
"I LOVE YOU"
SAY IT IN A DAILY
VALENTINE

said critics have taken informa-
tion out of context to support
their arguments and ignore rele-
vant data widely available in
scientific literature.
MANY OF Jackson's highly
technical rebuttals were direct-
ed at comments made last week
by Humanities Prof. Susan
Wright, who called for a slow-
er, more cautious approach to
recombinant DNA research.
Jackson challenged Wright to
substantiate her claim that
"there are many other ways of
gaining the understanding of
genetic mechanisms" which
scientists predict will come
from recombinant DNA tech-
niques.'
"It is my best professional
judgment as a scientist in the
field that this is incorrect,"
Jackson said.

By JEFF RISTINE
A University professor pur-
suing research into genetic,
transplants blasted critics of
the research yesterday and said
their "carelessness" will ad-
versely affect public interpre-
tation of the facts.
Microbiology Prof. David
Jackson, speaking at the secondI
of three weekly programs at
Rackham on the controversialE

recombinant

DNA research

WRIGHT, who was out of
town yesterday, is expected to
reply to Jackson's commentst
at next week's program.
The subject of increasing dis-
cussion at the University, re-.
combinant DNA methodology isi
applied to link DNA molecules
of two completely different or-
ganisms. This procedure alters
the genes of the host bacteriaj
and the new genetic information1
is passed on through succeed-,
ing "generations" as if it had.
been there all along.
Critics say the technique re-
sults in risks to human health
and poses ethical problems. Sci-
entists have agreed to a self-:
imposed moratorium on cer-
tain recombinant DNA experi-
ments pending the findings of a
National Institues of Health
(NIH) committee report.
JACKSON, who intends to
continue with recombinant DNA
experiments if University com-
mittees give their approval,!
said he has become "increas-I
ingly disturbed by the lack of
specificity" in critics' argu-
ments.
"Witnesses in a court of law
are expected to tell the truth,
the whole truth, and nothing but
the truth," Jackson said. "I be-
lieve we should be held to this
same standard . .."
Jackson said some critics

hive been "careless" in the
points used to support their ar-
guments. He cited Wrights's er-
roneous referral last week to
frogs as invertebrates (without
a backbone or spinal column),
which they are not.
OTHER "inadvertant misin-
formation" concerning safety
hazards and laboratory precau-
tions, Jackson said, will make
it difficult for non-scientists at
the University to make inform-
ed decisions about technical as-
pects of DNA research.
"It is already clear that re-
combinant DNA methodology
will be of enormous importance
to basic microbiological re-
search," he said.
The potential for creating
hazardous organisms is "a sol-
veable problem," according to
Jackson.
Also speaking at yesterday's
program was Genetics Prof. Er-
nest Chu, a member of the NIH
committee drawing national
guidelines for DNA ex-
neriments. The committee re-
leased a third draft of recom-
mended limitations on DNA re-
search last weekend.
Many of the proposed restric-
tions concern research with new
types of bacteria or viruses re-
sistant to both natural immune
defenses and drugs.

PROFS SPECULATE:

Teng new successor.

O2-t616

Ann Arbor

O beijiowe iw
334 S. STATE
663-5049 Ann Arbor

; ;) . TA KE A
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Dates of Trip: MARCH 6-13
Destination: FREEPORT BAHAMAS
Stay in the CASTAWAYS HOTEL
only22900
+ 10%0 + $3.00
Includes Air NON-STOP on Northwest Orient,
Hotel, Transfers, Baggage Handling, & Meals
in Flight.
OPEN TO U-M STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
LIMITED SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
$25.00 deposit required to hold reservation
CAMPUS INTERNATIONAL
Contact: Rosanne at 761-4965

(Continued from Page 1) ings.
that the lack of publicity is These meetings usually mean'
normal Chinese procedure, and "key personnel c h a n g e s or
added that he takes Hua's ap- changes in policy lines," accord-
pointment "seriously." ing to Oksenberg. But Oksen-
ALTHOUGH Oksenberg and sih berg would not speculate fur-
colleagues insist that it is still ther, saying, "We just don't
too early to speculate, several know enough about the Chinese
explanations for Hua's appoint- political system."
ment have emerged. They in- Information concerning Hua's
elude:early career is scant. Oksen-
-Hua may be a popular com- berg, from his research, thinks
promise c h o i c e because he he probably has a peasant back-
hasn't aligned himself with eith- ground and joined the Com-
er the moderates or the radi- munist party at an early age.
cals- He was a soldier in the Revolu-
-e was hand-picked by Mao tion, educated in the army, and
;as his protege since he made moved up the Chinese military.
his mark in Mao's home coun-
try," according to Whiting. BETWEEN 1945-49, he was
(Hua's experience in district most likely a member of the
and provincial government took fourth field army that captured
place in Mao's native Siangtan Hunan Province, according to
district of the Hunan province.) Oksenberg. He then worked his
way up to becoming the first
-HE WAS chosen premier to district secretary and finally
free Teng for the party chair- first province party secretary-
man position;
-he was the choice of an en-
tire high-level party leadership BERMUDA HOSTING
meeting which convened in Jan- MUSIC FESTIVAL

,
I
I

a position comparable to a gov-
ernor in the states.
In 1973, he was moved to Pe-
king.'
Hua demonstrated his capa-
bilities in his field of expertise-
agriculture-when he helped de-
velop a major water conserva-
tion program in the Shiangtan
district, no doubt visited by
Chairman Mao.
Some observers have said that
Hua may be "one of the most
feared men in China." But Whit-
ing, who just returned from
China in October, denied the al-
legation calling it "an absurd
statement."

a .

NIELSEN'S Flower Shop
& Garden Store

1021 MAIDEN LANE
ANN ARBOR

994-6112

Li u g w L1 :lVG1u11d l
uary.
Oksenberg said it was clear
in January that "things were
heating up" in the mainland
1whenkey officials "dropped
from sight." When no high offi-
cials in China appear in the
news, China watchers conclude
that they are engaged in one of
their bi-annual high-level meet-

r

HAMILTON, Bermuda (A')
-Bermuda is host for an inter-
national festival for the first
time, in January and February.
Thirty-three consecutive eve-
nings are bringing 13 programs
of instrumentalists, opera stars,
mime theater, drama, dance
and magic to Bermuda's capi-
tal city.
Hamilton's City Hall Theater
will have the majority of con-
certs.
Bermuda Festival '76 isvun-
der the auspices of the givern-
ment of Bermuda with the co-
operation of Eastern Airlines.

on WUOM 91FM

C
. O
C J
d

Peter,
Greenquist
Weekdays from
6:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 112
Tuesday, February 10, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i 1y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription'
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

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