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February 08, 1976 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-08

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 8, 1976

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GEO Membership

LOOKiNG

BACK

6i

Meeting
THURS., FEB. 12-8 P.M.

RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
AFFILIATION? Do you want GEO to
stay independent? Do you want GEO to
join AFT? Come and start the refren-
dum to vote your preference. Only a
membership meeting can start a ref-
erendum.
' .. Should GEOC require a minimutm turnout on this
referendum? At the present a majority of those
voting may decide the affiliation question. Should
we retain the present systemr?
BARGAINING-Shall we bargain for:
tuition waiver; benefits for GSA's under
1/4 time; % increase in wages; limit on
class size; stronger affirmative action
program.
We cannot bargain for what YOU want
until you say what your needs are. The
nature of the package will be defined at
THIS meeting. Come and make sure that
your preferences are heard.

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THE WEEK IN REVIEW
The announcement couldn't
Costs go up Ihave shocked too many people.
INTONING the familiar litany The arithmetic is simply inex-
-cost pressures and a likely ;orable. After last year's un-
cut in state appropriations - precedented $1.6 million cut in
top University officials gave appropriations, the new project-
formal notice to the student ed budget doesn't even restore
body last week that returning the reduction. Instead, the Uni-
in the fall will be more signifi- versity will get $1.48 million
canty costly. more next year, still over $100,-
T he first half of the one-two 000 less than two years ago.
punch came Wednesday when Neither Fleming nor Univer-
the Regents assented to Hous- sity Vice President Richard
ing director John Feldkamp's Kennedy would say how large
request for a rate hike aver- the hike would be, but both
age 8.9 per cent. Translated, a worried that the Universityf
double in West Quad will cost might price itself out of stu-
$1,402, and a single will run dents.
$1,753. University officials are not
Feldkamp pointed to the cost notorious for their sympathy
of living increases in the last for students, but even Kennedy
decade and claimed that Uni- acknowledged "We tend to think
versity housing hasn't even of tuition and housing increas-
kept pace with inflation. Admit- esas two different things, but
ting that students might expect they show up on the same line
regular rate boosts, Regent for the students."
Thomas Roach added, "Consid- With the hikes already in the
ering that we didn't raise rates works, however, there seems
last year, an 8.9 per cent in-! to be little relief in sight for
crease over two years is fair." the average student's budget.
And the University won't real-1
UNIVERSITY President Rob- ly find out how many students
ben delivered the coup-de- are priced out of attending un-
grace Thursday when he an- til next fall.1
nounced "there will definitely
be a tuition hike next fall" if DNA research
Governor Milliken's budget is
approved in Lansing. AS SCIENCE brings planet,
Earth closer to Brave New
World, the chilling ethical ques-
tions raised by Aldous Huxley's
famous novel have been trans-
formed from remote possibili-,
ties into all too stark realities.

Fleming Kennedy

Feldkamp

The real issue is what guide- WRIGHT CLAIMED one im-
lines will be established for1i mediate problem might be
controlling the potentially dan- that inadequate laboratory con-
gerous recombinant DNA re- trols might lead to the possi-
search - and who shall set bility that potentially harmful
them. bacteria might escape, posing
Non-scientists, like Humanities an obvious danger to people.
Prof. Susan Wright and Donald Microbiology Prof. David
Michael of the ISR argued Mon- Jackson, active in the field,
day night that the potential claimed the contarary, however,
benefits of such scholarship saying that the chances of in-
don't outweigh the possible haz- fection from genetically altered
ards. bacteria is "exceedingly low."

..

Wright asked for "a slower!
and more cautious approach"
to DNA research because "while
many of the claimed benefits
are dubious, the biological haz-
ards associated with recom-
binant techniques are relative-
ly clear."

A University policy study will
be released March 15, when
Committee B will make its re-
port on the ethical con-
siderations entailed in such re-
search. In the meantime, a
vacuum exists with no official
guidelines.
Thats not quite as bad as it
sounds, though. The National
Institute of Health recently
wrote guidelines covering the
area of recombinant research,
and Jackson said that "as a
matter of course," University

scholars are now following
those rules.
WHAT'S GOING ON in the
University is just a mir-
ror of a larger nationaldebate
on the same topic for the last
few years. This sensitive topic
is an area where technology
has outstripped philosophical
discussion on the subject. So
while scientists are naturally
eager to proceed and trample
the barriers of ignorance, oth-
ers have raised the questions
of safeguarding the environ
ment, and insuring that such
experiments won't create genet-
ic monsters.
The dialogue has at times be-
come hysterical, with members
of the scientific community
charging critics of the research
with attempting to stifle knowl-
edge gathering. In return, ad-
ern Frankensteins, eager to
create monsters without con-
sidering' the consequences of
their labors.
It's an issue that won't go
away, and, as time passes, will
likely only increase in import-
ance. So it's in the best inter-
est of all segments of the Uni-
versity community to write
widelines now, before the wa-
ters are further muddied.
CIA on campus
MANIPULATING the media,
that's the name of the game
for big-time protestors. If you

want to capture the ink, you've
got to make sure people notice
you. That's the obvious rationale
behind the group that showed up
at the Regent's meeting this
month to protest the presence
of CIA recruiters on campus.
Chanting the unoriginal "CIA
off campus" the demonstrators
managed to bring the public ses-
sion of the Regent's meeting to
a halt.
A leader for the group Col-
leen Chauvin, demanded that
the University cut all ties with
the CIA and the NSA, but as
she began to speakUniversity
President Robben Fleming had
asked her to sit down, remind-
ing her of the regular proce-
dure for addressing the Re-
gents.
But the group began to yell
once again, and Fleming allow-
ed Chauvin to continue. He set
vocates have been labelled mod-
Ithe date for a public meeting
with the group, Feb. 18. The
protestors then left, still chant-
ing.
The protestors got what they
sought, a public platform to air
their grievances with the Presi-
dent, even though they had been
told Monday by Career Plan-
ning and Placement officials
that the federal agencies don't
work through the University.
The unshakeable Fleming im-
plicitly accused the demonstra-
tors of a shabby performance
after they left, however, an-
nouncing that the had agreed to
meet with them before they
marched in on the meeting, but
that the group had refused,
"They wanted publicity. I
guess they'll get it now. I hope
they're happy," he said.
- STEPHEN SELBST
Let a Friend
Know You Care.
Send Them A
0 DAILY
vVALENTINE
DEADLINE: NOON
FRI., FEB. 13 r
o Sorry No Phone Orders

The University of Michioan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM oresents
DAVID ATKINSON

in

Man of

La Mancha

I

1 PERFORMANCE ONLY
February 23, 8:30 p.m.
in the POWER CENTER
Advance sales through PTP
Ticket O f f i c e located in
1 o b b y of Mendelssohn
Theatre, (313) 764-0450.
Tickets also available at all
Hudson Stores.

,

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Appearing at
CHANCES
ARE
ONE NIGHT ONLY
SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 8

IGEN

TUBIN

1

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Towards a
a 5C Sio n

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ciety

EXCHANGE
FELLOWSHIP
The Office of Study Abroad announces the
deadline for application materials for the
Graduate Exchange Fellowship program with
Tubingen University in the Federal Republic of
Germany. The scholarship provides approxi-
mately $300 per month for 10 months. Inter-
ested gradulate students in all fields are urged
to apply by March 1. A good command of
German is necessary. Contact Sam Wheelis,
1413 Mason Hall for details.

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,%w a.a la a5 va 1

t-- a- .-:- -

featuring:
Sam Ervin
Walter Cronkite
Paul McCracken
Karl Menninger
Margaret Mead

16

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10 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 9

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OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554
MONDAY thru FRIDAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
MlnAINFI3Jdv rni..ad vanceb y 3 m

Look Into Co-ops!
FOR NEXT FALL
WE ARE ..
" member-owned
* member-controlled
* open & democratic
COME TO THE
CO-OP MASS MEETI ,NG
SUNDAY, FEB. 0th--1:00 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
Learn about student-owned housing on
campus. All co-ops will hold open houses
for those interested in visiting them after
the Mass Meeting.
14 Houses on Central Campus
9 Houses on North Campus
Inter-CooperativeCouncil

I

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I

GG 2-441 4

Rm 4002 Michigan Union

5

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.in.

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