100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, January 9, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, January 9, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

.,.,..

" DEATH SHOULD NOT AFFECT DETENTE:
Mayor s committee proposes
Chou dies f cancer
$40 fine for unleashed dogs Chudefcne
(Continued from Page 1) singer, in Washington, respond- NIXON'S referenc
Republic of China announce with ed to the death by saying, "I ness was the result
By TOM STEVENS nent of the ordinance says she i trouble with dogs on campus. The proposal will be submitted extreme grief: Comrade Chou a d m i r e d Chou En-lai very Chou made during N
feels "this proposal is quite un-, The only thing such an ordi- to council Jan. 19 and will have En-lai, member of the C.P.C. much." to China in 1972. I
ity residents who fail to constitutional because it is a nance might do would be to pro- its first reading Feb. 2, followed Central Committee, member of FORMER President Richard Chou said, "The ge
h their cats or dogs and blanket type law." tect dogs from other dogs." by a public hearing. the Political Bureau of the Nixon said in San Clemente, of the world is defini

in Peking

e to dark-
of a toastl
Nixon's visit
n the toast,
neral trend
itely toward

C
leas

leave them free to roam the
streets may soon find them- pr aehesj
selves slapped with a $40 bill (problem
courtesy of a measure proposed (problem
by the Mayor's Animal Control dinance
Ordinance Committee.
If City Council approves the m form of h
proposal, a two-warden team uass
would be authorized to pick up eames
all unleashed cats or dogs and mnember
detain them at the Humane So- is "tred
ciety until the owners retrieve up dogs.'
them. nance wc
A maximum $40 handling fee tect the
could be levied against the
owner, but those people who KURTZ
claim their pets within 15 days Lion of an
could escape with a mere $25 licences,
fine. could be
THE PROPOSED ordinance I"pay for
THE ingwhich
also levies a $50-500 fine against volvemen
those owners who fail to clean owner w
up after pets who have defe- own w
cated on public property. thar
"My major concern is of hu- She ar
mane treatment of the ani- the anima
mals," e x p l a i n s committee pets more
member Bill Costello.=petsvmor
Committee secretary, Ann Ar- "We've
bor police Captain Bob Kahn, of dog bi
says the ordinance should be need t hi
enacted "because we've had councilma
many cases of dog bites and (D-Fourth
some people are fearful of loose H
n H9WE
animals." vl o
vel, dog
BARBARA Kurtz, an oppo- says, "I'v

for more creative ap-.
to solving this thing
of unleashed animals).r
n possible that this or-
could be used as a.
harassment of individ-t
e adds.-
Klemach, a committeeI
veterinarian, says he -
of repairing smashed-
The gist of this ordi-
ould really be to pro-
animals as well as peo-

CP.C. C e n t r a l Committee,
member of the standing com-
mittee of the Political Bureau of
the C.P.O. Central committee,
vice-chairman of the C.P.O.'
Central Committee, premier of
the State Council of the People's
Republic of China and chairman'
of the National Committee of
the Chinese People's political
consultative conference, died of
cancer at 0957 hours on January
8, 1976 in Peking at the age of
78."
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
~- ~ - T-

Calif., that Chou's "legacy will
be that he helped end the dark-
ness."
"Only a handful of men in the
20th century will match Pre-
mier Chou's impact on world
history.
"Of the more than 100 heads
of government that I have had
the privilege to meet in the past
25 years, there is none who sur-
passed him in the keen intel-
lect, philosophical breadth and
the experienced vision which
made him a great leader."

light and not darkness."
Aside from Communist party
chairman Mao Tse-tung, Chou
was the Chinese figure best
known to the outside world. Mil-
lions of Americans saw him on
live television during Nixon's
week-long visit to China in Feb-
ruary 1972.
It was Chou, in seemingly
tireless negotiations with Kis-
singer, who brought about the
historic about-face in Chinese
policy which made the visit and
improved Chinese-American re-
lations possible.
THE HSINHUA announcement
of his death said:
"Comrade Chou En-lai was a
fine member of the Communist
party of China, a great prole-
tarian revolutionary of the Chi-
nese people, a loyal revolution-
ary fighter of the Chinese peo-
ple and an outstanding, long-

tested leader of the party and
the state.
"Since comrade Chou En-lai
fell ill in 1972, he had been
g i v e n meticulous, many-sided
treatment by medical personnel
under the constant and affec-
tionate attention of our great
leader Chairman Mao and the
party Central Committee. He
persevered in work all the time
and waged a tenacious struggle
against the illness.
"Owing to the worsening of
his condition despite all treat-
ment, comrade Chou n-laid, the
great fighter of the Chinese peo-
ple, finally departed from us.
His death is a gigantic loss to
our party, our army and the
people of our country, to the
cause of China's socialist revolu-
tion and construction, to the in-
ternational cause of opposing
imperialism, colonialism a n d
hegemonism, as well as to the
cause of the international Com-
munist movement."
The funeral will be held in
Peking on Jan. 15, the Chinese
Embassy in Tokyo said.

suggests the imposi-
additional fee for dog
so that the revenue
used by the city to
proper animal train-
I would create an in-
t on the part of the
hich would be more
netary."
gues this would give
al owners the incentive
for and control their
e effectively.
had a lot of complaints
tes. I think we really
i s ordinance," says,
an Jamie Kenworthy
h Ward).
VER, on the street le-
owner Barb Wilson
ve never run into any

e

WIJprot prai-ses
Chinese premier

(Continued from Page 1)
character of Teng's leadership,
Whiting described a sharp con-
trast between Chou and the
current deputy premier. Chou,
he said, was a charismatic lead-
er who has gained the alle-
giance of millions and the per-
sonal loyalty of thousands more

told Whiting the leader "re-
minded him of a 'Godfather."'
WHITING SAID Chou's death
would not significantly affectC
Sino-Soviet relations as "the key
determinant in relations with
the Soviets is Mao . . . since it
is primarily an ideological (con-

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
THIS UNLEASHED DOG, enjoying a carefree romp through
the snow, could cost its owner a $40 fine if a proposed leash
law is adopted by city council next month. The measure,
drawn up by the Mayor's Animal Control Ordinance Commit-
tee, is scheduled for a first reading Feb. 2.

since the 1949 revolution.
"Teng has no such lines of
loyalty," Whiting declared.
"You can't put Teng and Chou3
in the same breath. Teng is a I
caretaker for a transition of in-

Goodman appoints
new associate VP
By MITCH DUNITZ Rick David, saying she wanted
Student Government Council someone she felt could do a
(SGC) President Debra Good- better job.
man announced last night the "The new council is starting
appointment of Literary College!out well" Goodman exclaimed
Junior Amy Blumenthal as the at last night's opening session
new associate vice president. of the new council, referring to
"I have a lot of confidence the new members elected last
in her (Blumenthal)" Goodman month.
said. "She has a lot of time, In addition to the Blumenthal
and is very organized." appointment, two new commit-
"With Amy's help we should tees were formed at last night's
be able to get all the commit- meeting: the Affirmative Action
tees moving. Her duties will in- committee to research allegedI
lude coordinating actions for past University violations andj
all committees and placing to see that proper funding is se-
meeting times in The Daily's cured and the Student Legal Ad-I
Happenings column." Goodman vocate Program to help students
added. with legal problems. Both com-
The position was vacated last mittees consist of a mixture of
month when Goodman fired old and new council members.
Rent strike rulI n
favors management

"c "

n u~ ~~~~determinate r 7 j 1.length while Mao
yParty Chairman) dies - he's!
going to face a lot of juggling!1
1 ll ere l tofor power."f
fros weren't told said Chou's death
would not have "any effect at'
all" on detente between the1
o iew otter p United States and China, sincel
Teng has guided China's policy
through Chou's year and a half
(Continued from Page 1) Official communication relaying of incapacitation.
students in the Bell Tower Hotel news of the lottery at that time CONCERNING Chou's influ-f
until vacancies occurred, con- because the specifics of the plan ence over the government's for-,
verting existing double rooms to had not been formulated. eign relations, Whiting said,
triples, and a consideration of!
lottery systems at other schools. IT WAS not until mid-Decem- "Chou would hell tilt away
her, in the little-read Housing from force. He was a states-
According to at least three plletin that the inevitability of man first and foremost."I
committee members, Chairman the lottery was confirmed. Some leaders advocate a
Peter Schoch, director of off- "harder line" in China's for-
campus housing, and two stu- "I doubt if few people even eign affairs, he continued, say-
dent members, Jane Range and know it (the bulletin) exists, ing, "I think Teng os one of:
Terri Hayles, it was concluded said Range. ,those."
by their Oct. 15 meeting that "Nobody reads that stuff," Whiting met with Teng Hsiao-
another lottery,was inevitable. Schoch said, "but I don't think ping only last October as an
Schoch said that there was no that is our fault." advisor on intelligence for a
group of American foundations.
In a two-hour meeting with the
denuty premier, he said he was
impressed by the "force of pow-
er he communicated." Whiting ,
W hy not join the DAILY ? Iadded that a visitor of Teng's
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO: V EmI LXXXVI, No. 85
" meet other good people Friday, January 9, 1976
* drink 5c Cokes at tebyiesiysf ihian ewts
" learn the operations of a newspaper phone 764-0562. Second class postage
lerteoertospaid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
* writeston nriesPublished d a iiy Tuesday through
* see your name in print Sunday morning during the Ulniver-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
* earn a e money Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-I
Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and tars); $13 by mail outsideAnn Ar-
join the business, news, sports or photography bor
staffsSummer session published Tues-
staffs* day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

frontation)."
He said he expects infirmf
Mao to live "as long as these
drugs keep him alive. Maybe
a year or it may be four orj
five."
!Whiting reacted with surprise1
to the news that the Chinese
leadership had withheld the an- E
nouncement of Chou's death
from the Chinese people.
"Apparently what they're .
trying to do is get some kind of
legitimization of Teng in line,"
he said.
TRAINING
WORKSHOP
IN
Gestalt, "Hot Seat"
work, and interpersonal
group process.
Wednesday Evenings
LEADERS: Michael Andes,
Richard Kempter
995-0088

i

INTERESTED IN GRADUATE
WORK IN EDUCATION?
PROGRAMS OF STUDY IN THE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION
Leading to the Doctor of Philosophy
+ Adult Education
" Curriculum and Philosophy
" Education and the Social Order
" Educational Administration
" Educational Psychology
" Higher Education
" Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistical Analysis
" Language and Reading in Instruction
" The Study of Teacher Education
Leading to the Master's Degree and Certificate of
Advanced Study
" Preservice Preparation for Elementary Teaching (MST)*
" Preservice Preparation for Secondary Teaching (MAT)*
" Program for Experienced Teachers
" Reading Consultant
*Previous work in Education is not a prerequisite
For Information Write
Roger A. Pillet
Secretary, Department of Education
The University of Chicago
5835 S. Kimbark Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60637

- lm- asi m sa si m - - m m -
GREAT LUNCHES and DINNERS I
BEST CHEESECAKE
IN TOWN 1

i
i
i

I MW

0

(Continued from Page 1)
cases to mediation in order to
"do anything expedient in solv-
ing the dispute."
AATU organizer Larry Cooper-
man said the tenants union con-
tested the judges' decision on
the escrow funds and Jonathan
Rose, Washington County Legail
Aid lawyer representing the ten-
ants, opposed Black's request
for mediation.
MATUSZAK admitted Black is
"obviously" experiencing some
financial difficulties as a result
of the withheld rents. He also
said the strike "is costing him
(Black) a lot of additional
money in attorney fees."
However, Matuszak said he
did not know of any other frus-
trations Black has, as alleged
by an Ann Arbor Tenants Union
(AATU) organizer, except that
"he wonders what the outcome
will be."
According to Matuszak, neither
Black nor the court recognizes
the existence of the AATU in the
dispute.
BUT AATU organizer Larry
Cooperman said last night, "We
didn't ask the court to recog-
nize the tenants union. The
Court never recognizes anyone,
that's not its purpose."
Yesterday, Black refused any
personal comment on the rent
strike.
Meanwhile, Matuszak said his
client has yet to register the
name "Sunrise" with the county
clerk's office because "he's been
busy with the rent'strike since
the first of December." Black
changed the name from "Trony
BElT
MIDRASH
COING
CMING '

Associates" a f t e r purchasing
the company from its two pre-
vious owners. Black's lawyer
said the new name was meant
to "change the image" of the
firm.
The s t r i k e, organized by
AATU( was announced in No-
vember in protest of what some
tenants called inadequate main-
tenance and security.

Ur
Longevity Cookery
314 E. Liberty
Ann Arbor, Mich.
(313) 662-2019
GOURMET NATURAL FOOD RESTAURANT
NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
of -m ms -s -n - - - - - mmo wEl

I

40~
* BOOK #ALEL1;ir
FOR A FEW DAYS ONLY (2)4
& J
ALL
HARDCOVER BOOKS*411
40
CENTICORE'S POST-CHRISTMAS SALE AFFORDS
YOU A ONCE-A-YEAR OPPORTUNITY TO AVAIL
YOURSELF OF A VERY GENEROUS OFFER TO
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A POST - CHRISTMAS
SALE THAT AFFORDS Y O U A ONCE-A-YEAR
OPPORTUNITY . . .
(1) Cash or Check only
Quantities Limited & LOEB Library Excepted
(2). All Sales Final
3~

MICHIGAN FROSH & SOPHOMORES
GEORGE WASHINGTON was an Army Officer, so
were TEDDY ROOSEVELT, HARRY TRUMAN and
DWIGHT EISENHOWER.
MOLLY PITCHER b e c a m e the first female I
American soldier when she loaded cannon in a
Revolutionary War battle against the British (She
received a veteran's pension for her troubles as
well).3*
Perhaps you are missing a bet in not picking up a
commission as an Army Officer while here at the
University of Michigan.
It's not too late to start the Army Officer Educa-
Iyr, ;tion Program if you are willing to play a little catch
up. It won't interfere with your regular program,
q provides leadership /management training and
opens the possibility for a rewarding time. No obli-
( gation in Frosh/Sophomore years.
7.a

" "

yrrr i

WE ARE BACK!

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan