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February 07, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-07

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. oturday, February 7, 1976

PaeE .h .T.HE. ..MI.C..HI..GA..N ..DA..ILYl 3aturdlayII February 7, 1976IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMll

__.. ..

ANN ARBOR PREMIEREG
THE OTHER HALF OF THE SKY:
A CH INA ,MEM OIR
This film by Shirley MacLaine and Claudia Weil is about the first Women's Delegaton to
the People's Republic of China. The delegation-a Southern black civil rights worker, a
Calfornia teenager, a Texasthousewife, a Navajo social worker, a New Englad Republican.
a Puerto Rican sociologist, the four woman technicl crew and. Maclane-talk with Chinese
women about their lives and values One part of the film even demonstrates the use of
acupuncture during a Caesarean section; the mother eats apples and waves to the camera
during surgery.
"As an introduction to this alien culture whose revolution has effected remarkable change
in a mere 25 years, THE OTHER HALF OF THE SKY is perhaps the purest and most
frankly emotional exploration I've seen."-Marjorie Rosen, MS. Magazine
SATURDAY, FEB. 7-7 & 9 P.M.--$1.5
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER
The filmmaker, CLAUDIA WEIL, will speak after both- shows
SPONSORED BY: The Women's Program Coordinator, The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative,
The Department of English, The Women's Film Festival Committee, International Women's
Year

INTRODUCTION TO
KUNDALINI YOGA
os touaht by
Swami Rudrananda
and
Michael Shoemaker
Beginners' Classes Every
MWF at 5:30 p.m.
RUDRANANDA ASHRAM
640 Oxford, 995-5483

Kiwanis offers sale

Tremors

I

I

Today at 1-3-5-7-9T
Open 12:45
e of
"f
EPfERC0
ter-s,

(Continued from Page 1)
the sale with something in
mind .
"I came for a breadbox and
that's what I got," he said,
holding up his merchandise.
Some shoppers are students
searching for possible apart-
ment furnishings. But two un-
dergraduates yesterday had
other intentions - picking up a
pink woman's hat and an old
baby doll to use as props for
a film class.
SOME OF the shoppers claim-
ed to be just "browsers" while
others were more serious about
the event.
One elderly man vigorously
CA/I w'C/
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Bible Study
at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
at 10:00 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-a place
for people
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Coffee.
10:15 a.m.-Morning Worship:

Wohtiih erice4

tackled a box of eyeglass cases,
oblivious to his surroundings.1
Nearby, a young woman care-
lessly scattered the contents of
a box of stationery items, say-
ing, "I'm looking for treasures."
Before the sale opened on
Thursday about 200 diehard
bargain - hunters waited out-
side the Kiwanis building wea-
thering the city's latest cold
front. According to Kiwanis
members, some were standing
outside as early at 7:30 for the
10:00 a.m. opening.
TODAY t h e already l o w
prices will hit rock-bottom, ac-
cording to Maybee. "We want
to get rid of everything," he

says. "It comes down to 'what'll
you offer?"'
Sweaters selling for 25 cents,
slacks for SO cents and dress
patterns for 10 cents were Fri-
day's going prices. Shoes cost
anywhere from $3 down to 50c.
Merchandise for the sale
comes from local donations. The
annual sale is Kiwanis' only
fund-raising event, and proceeds
are given to local projects such
as Mott's Children's Hospital,
senior citizen groups, Boy and
Girl Scouts, Ozone House and
the Learn to Swim program at
the Ann Arbor Y.
Today's sale runs from 101
a.m. to 3 p.m.

HAVE YOU MADE IT
THAT'S THE WAY THE DUTCH DO IT.
A POUCH OF IMPORTED DRUM ROLL-YOUR-OWN TOBACCO
PLUS A PACK OF DRUM PAPER ...AN 80C VALUE FOR ONLY 25C.
IM 0
If you haven t smoked a cigarette made with Drum.
you re in for a BIG, pleasant surprise Drums choice. dark and bright tobaccos
have a full-bodied taste that makes ordinary cigarettes taste...well, ordinary
And Drums long strand tobaccos are so easy to roll you won t have to use a machine
And each Drum pouch is double wrapped for ext ra freshness.
For a much better smoke at half the price mke y.urs wih Dutch-made DruM
Send for our special offer and discover why most peo'ple who try Drum
never go back to factory-ma -e 'r'i
r------------------------------------------------------------------_.-----_.
r Well send you a full pouch of DRUM (good for 40 cigarettes) plus a packet CD
swap! containing 100 leayes of superior DRUM papers. A combined retail value
of 80C. All you send us is 25c. Fair swap? Then mail this coupon today
and well include our booklet. "A GUIDE TO ROLLING YOUR OWN CIGARETTES:
I t_ _ _ _
NAME Y
ADDRESS_______Z.Pr
This offer is not available to minors and is void whr r raxed by is. ' rm
per family and expires April 1. 1976 Ma ito: Ou w^ Eb"rrs inc ,0 PO x 41 .htsOrth "nl r

strike
again

C

Today at 1:20-3:15-
7:10-9:10 Open at 1:00
"Fascinating
Entertainment"
-N.Y. Times
EMANUEL L WOLF,-,
CONDUCT
FPAA LtiAOLORV
P -L +n.A 4ALLI ARTISTS" K

it
1
I
e
I
(

Todav at 1I:00-:05-5:15-
7:25-9:30 Open at 12:45
'One of the year's 10 best. '-Time
!e !cl Huston-]oh Foreman fim
S gAn Allied Artists
Columbia Pictures Production
An Allied Artists Release po

"The Problem of Job."
6:00 p.m. - Evening discus-
sion: "Christ and Culture" -
speaker, Dr. Edmund Clowney,,
president of Westminster Theo-
logical Seminary.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal)
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth j
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpar-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.n.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
** *
BETHLEHEM UNITEDj
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
10:00 a.m.-Church School.
Child. care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
ice.
Service broadcast on WNRS
(1290 AM).
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-5:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;
10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
days.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 N. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-6624466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Young Adult meals-Sunday,
12:30 p.m. Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. S u n d a y: Adult
study.
12:00-1:00 Thursday: Thursday
Forum (lunch, $1.25).
C h a n c e 1 Choir - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For more information about
the Young Adult Program call
Jo Ann Staebler at the church,
662-4466.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m.-Communion Serv-
ice-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Church
School.
Sermon: "The Presence," by
Rev. Fred B. Maitland.
Broadcast on WNRS (1290)
AM radio from 11:00-12:00 noon
each Sunday.
WESLEY FOUNDATION NEWS
Sunday, Feb. 8:
7:30 p.m.-Grad group in the
Wesley Lounge-a discussion of
person - to - person communica-
tions.
Wednesday, Feb. 11:
4:00-6:00 p.m. - Grad coffee"
hour in the Wesley Lounge.

(Continued from Page 1)
tion in Geneva said its field
reports indacated nearly 6,000
killed.
THEY SAID the town of Pat-
zicia, population 11,000, was flat-
tened; whole blocks of Chilmal-
tenango, population 21,000, were
razed, and Zumpango, 11,000,
was in ruins. All are within 50
miles of Guatemala City.
The magnificent buildings and
churches built in Antigua by
Spanish conquerers were in
ruins and entire church belfries
lay on the ground.
"You've got to get the word
out to the world that the situa-
tion is very grave in Guate-
mala," implored Rene A.
Flores, the Caritas relief coor-
dinator. "World opinion has got
to be convinced."
GUILLERMO Echeverria Viel-
mans, coordinator of the emer-
gency committee, said 1,000
soldiers and about 900 military
cadets had been assigned to dis-
tribute relief supplies, but most
of the aid was going to stricken
areas in the capital city because
there was no way to get it out
to the countryside.
Echeverria said the bridges
at Aguacaliente and Belice were
impassible, making it impossible
for traffic to reach Guatemala
City from its main Atlantic
ports of Barrios and Santo
Tomas de Castillo.
"The backbone of Guatema-
lan commerce has been brok-
en," he said.
Thousands of homeless fami-
lies who survived Wednesday's
edvastating earthquake, camp-
ed out in the strets of the capi-
tal and firemen dug for corpses.
Prof s
testify on
ecolog
research
(Continued from Page 1)
mentation of all environmental
action must takeplace at the
local level," he said. "We do
not . have that expertise . pres-
ently available."
OTHER witnesses testifying
included Dr. Edward Weidner,
Chancellor at the University of
Wisconsin - Green Bay, and
Dr. Alfred Beeton of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin - Milwau-
kee.
Congressman Esch, who is
running for the Senate seat to
be vacated by retiring Senator
Phillip Hart, has participated in
similar hearings elsewhere
around the country at universi-
ties in Calofirnia and Texas.
One University prof said she
was "skeptical" on the out-
come of such hearings. "The
strategy of holding hearings in
an election year is an import-
ant aspect of any well-consider-
ed .election campaign. Sort of
a variation on 'a chicken-in-ev-
ery pot' theme."

. < s"!
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. . . missing out
on some of the

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. . .

DAILIESbecause
of delivery
mistakes?
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disagree with a bill
we sent you for THE DAILY?
WE'D LIKE TO TRY TO STRAIGHT-
EN OUT THAT PROBLEM, BUT WE
CAN'T IF YOU DON'T LET US
KNOW ABOUT IT.

ISRAEL
TEL AVIV
UNIVERSITY
*
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IN ENGLISH
When you study
abroad you share a
people's culture,
country and heritage.
It's an education you
can't get in a book.
At Tel Aviv University
what you do learn in
a book or lecture is
taught in english. It
makes learning a lot
easier.TAU is a liberal
arts college with
coursework in 61
fields, offering trans-
fer programs for a
semester, a year or
longer. Check us out
by.checking the cou-
pon below.
TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY
342 Madison Ave. N.Y. N.Y.
10017 " (212) MU 7-5651

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