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February 05, 1976 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-05

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. Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February-5, 1976

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, February*5, 1976

Snow's new album

Rockefeller says he won't
rule out presidential bid

'

(Continued from Page 5)
an enhancing tune with some of
the finest harmonies you're apt
to hear in a long time. "In-
spired Insanity" as definitely
first runner-up to these two mas-
terpieces with its off-the-wall
humorous delivery and message.
When Phoebe really wants to
let go and swing on "Let The
Good Times Roll" from her first
LP, she adapts other people's
material in novel arrangements.
Her vision of the Motown hit
"Goin Down For The Third
Time" and the George and Ira
Gershwin composition "There's
A Boat That's Leaving Soon For
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE]
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
ARBORLAND-971 -9975
MAPL VILLAGE-761 -2733
E. IBERTY-66 9329
E. UIVERITY662-0354

New York" are notable for their
experimentation as well as the j
energetic treatment she gives
them. But the LP's standout
tune is the classic 'No Regrets"
which Phoebe has perfected in,
her live performances.
Phoebe's singing has not so
much improved as adjusted to
the different demands and styles
of her material. Her husky voice
is capable of giving emphasis
to a word or phrase that might
otherwise be lost in the shuffle.
IN THE rapidly-growing world
of female singers, Phoebe shows
that she can hold her own
against the best of them. What
gives her an edge over Maria
Muldaur, Bonnie Raitt, Linda
Ronstant and others is her abil-
ity to compose music that com-
pletely suits' her vocal delivery.
On Second Childhood, it is evi-
dent Phoebe will have the op-
portunity to develop and mature
her talents for 'some time to
come.

WASHINGTON (A) - Vice "I withdrew as vice presi-
President Nelson Rockefeller dent," Rockefeller said. "My
says he has not ruled out an- statement included the vice
other run for the presidency if presidency only, as to availa-
President Ford is knocked out bility. Beyond that I have no
of the race for the Republican plans."
nomination.
Rockefeller made the remark R O C K E F E L L E R add-
to a group of reporters yester- ed, however, that he expects
day in a private breakfast meet- Ford to defeat his only an-
ing. nounced challenger, former
California Gov. Ronald Reagan,

f

Published reports of the
meeting contained no direct
quotes saying Rockefeller is
holding open the door for a
presidential bid, but a Rocke-
feller spokesperson confirmed
the conclusion of the stories.
ROCKEFELLER . also, how-
ever, pointed out that there are
a number of other likely can-
didates ready to jump into the
race if Ford falls out. But he
said it would be difficult for
anyone to win the nomination
by entering only the late pri-
maries. '
Concerninghis .role with the
Domestic Council, Ford Press
Secretary Ron Nessen said the
change occurred in December
after Rockefeller wrote Presi-
dent Ford asking that his role
be. curtailed.

MEANWHILE, the White
House said Rockefeller has re-
linquished day-to-day supervi-
sion of the Domestic Council, at
his own volition.
In its story concerning Rocke-
feller's breakfast session, the
Washington Star quoted Rocke-
feller as saying of his political
future: "It's a very fluid situa-
tion . . . my situation."

in the early primaries and go?
on to win the GOP nomination.'
"Rockefeller said repeatedlyl
that he expects President Ford!
to win the nomination,"' wrote
Star political writer Jack Ger-1
mond. "But his pointed refusal
to close the door himself is the+
kind of signal of availability;
he has sent frequently in the+
past."1

(I<:; s;o >o<:::>: > c<:> AP Photo
_ REFUGEES HUDDLE in a Guatemala City street after -4 major earthquake struck yester-
Daily VALENTINES ojday. An estimated 2,000 persons were killed.
DEADLINE: NOON
FI 3 Central American earthquake
FR I.,F E B. 1
Special Rates devastates city, kills 2000
P.C. We all love you and Toto, Sorry, No Phone Orders (gontinued from Page 1) Radio Fabulosa, the only People j a m m e d into the
Thousands in this c a p i t a 1 commercial radio station func- streets in the neighborhood of
>o<< < o - erected makeshift shelters from tioning in Guatemala City, said Barrio del Gallite west of the
-canvas, plastic covers and bed- 500 persons had been killed in main square where full blocks
sheets, preferring these to their San Mateo Ixtlatan near the of adobe houses were destroyed.
TICKETS ON SALE TODAY! damaged homes as aftershocks border with Mexico. Many wept helplessly for those
eclse presents continued throughout the day. "Telephone communications trapped in the debris.
Cp peThe midtown area, known as are cut with many sections so
the third and fifth zones, appear- we are having some trouble es- SOME SECTIONS of the city
ed the most heavily damaged. tablishing accurate c o u n t s,' were without water and women
COMMUNICATIONS w it h i n Ponce said. "We only have a and bchildren climbed through
the country were interrupted little information." debris looking for water. Fist
but reports of casualties were' fights started around a broken
reaching other countries from HE SAID the hardest hit water main where survivors
Guatemala City. zones were the two-thirds of the tried to gather enough water to
- -- country north of Guatemala last the night.
City. Much of Guatemala's 67,- The Guatemalan ambassador
LI ~l\IEW ORK 511 square miles is remote and in Columbia, Stella de Chees-
has limited communication with man said after having made
j ~~~~~~~the capital under best condi-masiafehvngad
PRESENTS tions. direct contact with Guatemala
tin.City she had received reports
GESTALT WORKSHOP Roads into the destroyed pro- that at least ,600 'persons had
cial areas were out, Ponce been killed.
FOR COUPLES- said, and the country desperate- ;
ly needs portable light plants, The CARE relief organization
tractors and bulldozers to re- in New York said its representa-
SATURDAY LEADERS: open them. tives in Guatemala dnd Hon-
MICHAEL ANDES and Two men carrying a wooden duras reported a death toll in
CATHERINE LILLY box with a body inside asked Guatemala City of 500 and 2,000
Feb. soldiers in the capital where injured.
CHARLIE*HADEN;PAUL*MOTIANF$30! they could put the corpse. All CARE SAID it was standing
with DEWEY*REDMAN, they were told was not to leave CR I D i was standing
itinth sret esuebeaue oreritmihtiby with relief supplies- in Hon-
it in the street because it might elief Services
FEBRUARY 14-8:00 P.M *hampers r
Emphasis on communication h r urin New York said it was flying
and self-expression LINES OF bloody people form- in supplies, funds and disaster
TICKETS. $4.00, 4.50, 5.00. Available at Discount Records . Please call 995-0088 ed outside Roosevelt Hospital, experts to Guatemala.
al Michigan Union Box Office-763-1107whhha t daditn he
and leave message which had stopped admitting the It was the third major earth-
injured. One woman said she Y ro ..ff d

Doctors in California end
35-day slowdown action

LOS ANGELES (P)-Protest-
ing doctors yesterday declared
an end to their 35-day malprac-
tice insurance slowdown but
warned "next time everyone
will go out" if something is not
done to ease the crisis.
The United Physicians of Cal-
ifornia (UPC), claiming 80 per
cent of the state's 41,000 li-

censed physicians,
would be back in
today, but it was
that meant that
would be back.
A SPOKESMAN

said doctors
their offices
not clear if
all doctors
for the or-

it looks like nothing is happen-
ing, there is the implied threat
next time everyone will go out"
and not only the Southern Cali-
fornia area specialists who were
the majority of the stoppage..
Except for a two-day show of
support, most general care doc-
tors did not take part in the
slowdown which the UPC said
involvedabout 23,000 doctors at
its height. The UPC is an 'Um-
brella organization with repre-
sentatives of a number of other
physician groups.
THE .END TO the walkout
came as 300 statewide repre-
sentatives of the UPC met here
and voted unanimously to ap-
prove a statement thattsaid,
"Phase one, to bring about a
resolution of the medical mal-
practice insurance problem--the
job action-has come to a suc-
cessful conclusion.

"It (the protest) has demon-
strated to the public tlat the
malpractice problem is a real
crisis demanding solution."
Dr. Richard Corlin, speaking
for the physicians' group, said
the protest "has brought the
enormity of the problem to the
attention of the opinion makers
in the state, including the news
media.
"M O S T IMPORTANT," he
said, "it has captured. the-atten-
tion of the state administration
and the legislature andbforced
them to address the public ser-
iously so that there can be an
early resolution of this distress-
ing problem."
The work halt ended most
elective surgery and saw sur-
geons and many specialists stop
seeing all but postoperative pa-
tients.

ganization which led the protest
slowdown said the return to
work was prompted by assur-
ances from political leaders in
Sacramento that a solution could
be reached to the insurance
crisis that has sent malpractice
rates up more than 300 per cent..
But the spokesmanadded, "If

a~yi i:: .:+. AM :ir:rWO. .r. Rt..'.''r"".." . "."h. ".v^.i.i} : +
DAILY, OFFICIAL BUL LETIN ?
:.sA' . :{i " ::"i°r"S, v .' 1.:,"i:;:. Jf" ?YsY .ok 'y~rri."++.. . . ..a " :i -A~a}'SF~. .

I
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r
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it

Discount Calculators
NOW LOCATED AT
529 E. LIBERTY
INSIDE DAVID'S BOOKS

had been turned away at Gen- . Iofithe entury auIIeLaU
eral Hospital because it was by this shake-prone capital. The,
full. other two, in 1902- and 1917, also
.The Roosevelt Hospital mor- caused widespread destruction
gue was jammed to the doors. and casualties.
Three bodies lay in the hall out- -
side. i Two previous capitals of Gua-
-_temala, built on neighboring
sites, were destroyed by natural
WE'RE THE disasters. The first capital was
OLDEST JIengulfed by a tidal wave after

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Notices
should be sent in TYPEWRIT-
TEN FORM to 409 E, efftrson,
before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication and by 2
p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication.
For more information, phone
764-9270.
Thursday, February 5
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Karen DeCrow, pres., NOW,
"Expanding the Women's Move-
ment," 10 a.m.; 11:30 p.m
Ctr. Japanese Studies: David
Hughes, "Papermaking in Japan:
Perspectives on a Traditional Craft,"
Commons Rm., Lane Hall, noon.
Public Health Films: You're Too
Fat. Aud., SPH II, 12:10 p.m.
Behavioral Science: Penelope Eck-
ert, "Language," Lee Rm. 1, MLB,
3:30 p.m.
MHRI: Jack Hailman, U. of Wis-
consin, "Optical Signals of Animals,"
1057 MHRI, 3:45 p.m.
Geology, Mineralogy: Gerald R.
Smith, "Lake Idaho Fossil Fishes:
Palehydrology and Evolution," 1528

CC Little, 4 p.m.
History: James Sheehan, North-j
western U., "German Liberalism
and National Socialism," Aud. A,
Angell, 4:15 p.m
Int'l Night: Caribbean menu,
League Cafeteria, 5-7:15 p.m.
Guild House: David Oleshansky,
Nels Johnson, poetry reading, 802
Monrot, 7:30 p.m.
Chemistry: G. Haighr, U. of Illi-
nois, "Inorganic/Electron - Transfer
Mechanisms," 1300 Chem., 8 p.m.
Music School: Degree recital-Tru-
dy Fredericks, piano, Recital Hall,
8 p.m
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 764-7460
MAT for Liberal Arts grads who
have taken few, if any, Education
courses offered at" Reed College,
Portland, OR.; scholarships and/or
student loans available; appl. forms
& financial aid available from Grad
Studies Office, Reed College, Port-
land, OR. 97202.
Colorado College, Colorado Springs,
offers MAT degree for Liberal Arts
grads & other MAT programs for
experienced teachers; for further
info contact: Chairman of Educ.
Dept., Colorado College, Colorado
Springs, CO. 80903.
Saint Andrew's Society, State of
New York, offers scholarships to
Amer. students of Scottish descent
to 'study in universities of Scot-
land; each scholarship provides
U". ** "**

$5,000 stipend - to cover transporta-
tion,.tuition & living expenses; sim-
ilar scholarships available from
Grandfather Mountain Highland
Games scholarship fund, or similiar
award of scholarship from Saint An-
drew's Society of D.C,; appl. dead-
line Feb. 1, 1976; for application
or more info write: Secretary of
Society, 281 Park Avenue South,
N.Y., N.Y. 10010.
Harvard Summer School/Radcliffe
College offers annual course in pub-
lishmg procedures, June 28 - Aug.
6, 1976; good record of placements
in magazine, book publishing co.'s.,
etc.; application deadline April 1,
1976; for further info write: Har-
vard Summer School, Radcliffe Pub-
lishing Course, 10 Garden St., Cam-
bridge MA, 02138..
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Interview: Camp Sea Gull, MI.
Coed: interview Mon., Feb. 9, 9-3;
specialists-nurse; cooks; waterfront
(WSI), canoe, tennis, gymnastics,
arts/crafts, riding (Eng.), etc.; reg-
ister in person or by phone.
Deadline to update your Summer
Federal Service Exam is Feb. 27;
can only be done if you are updat-
ing for last year; form available at
this office.
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed: inter-
view Wed , Feb. 11, 9-12 & Feb.
19, 9-5; openings cover counselors,
specialists, drivers,,cooks, nurse.

CAR RENTAL
IN ANN ARBOR
With the
NEWEST
MODELS

a volcano eruption in 1541, and
the second capital was oblite-
rated by an earthquake in 1773.

Chevette
Nova
Vega
Pinto
Datson 240Z
Mark IV

Malibu
Monte Carlo
LTD
Elite
Torino
Limo

NOON LUNCHEON
* Homemade soup & sandwich 50c
Friday, February 6
with
BARBARA SMITH
Graduate Student and Member,
Association of Native American Students
"WAYS OF LIVING OF
* - NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE"

II

.. .

DON'T MISS THE ANNUAL
KIWANIS S-ALE
THURSDAY-10 A.M.-8 P.M.
FRIDAY-12 1OON-8 P.M.
SATURDAY-1 0 A.M.-3 P.M.

r
f

ECONO-CAR
438 W. HURON
663-2033

GUILD HOUSE

802 Monroe

Kiwanis Activity Center
CORNER W. WASHINGTON AND FIRST STREETS
Lots of cood buys on furniture, housewares, clothing,
shoes, books, toys, bicycles and so forth..

1
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__ _. ___ M __
I

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AD The Gap Stores, Inc. 1975

I

HEWLETT
PACKARD
HP 25--179.95
(Scientific-Programable)
HP2-$ 15422P95
(Financial-Statistical)
HP 21-$94.95
(Basic Scientific)

KINGS POINT
a great line of superbly priced calculators
FN 85-$69-95
(Financial)
SC-60-$89.95
(Compare with SR51A)
SC-20-$57.95
(Compare with TI SR50A)
SC-33-$39.95
(Same chipo asSR16)
KP-9-$15.95
(Memory)

TEXAS
INSTRUMENTS
S R5OA-$69 .95
(Scientific)
5R51 A-$1 03.95
(Scientific-Statistical)

Fall intoTheGa
The Gap Stores, Inc. is a rapidly expanding chain of over 150 retail
stores specializing in casual sportswear for the entire family. We are
growing at a 40%-60% pace and aggressively compete in thirty (30)
major metropolitan markets nationwide.
On FEBRUARY 11, 1976, we will be interviewing graduating seniors
for the position of STORE MANAGER TRAINEE. This is an excellent
opportunity for anyone interested in a career in retailing, manage-
ment, buying or marketing. B.A. degree required and related major
or experience preferred.

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Professor, Department of Zoology
JACK HAILMAN
The University of Wisconsin. Madison, Wisconsin
"OPTICAL SIGNALS OF ANIMALS"
Thursdcy, February 5, 1976
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., 1057 MHRI
TEA: 3:15 p.m., 2059 MHRI
COMING SPEAKERS:
February 12: HENRY MAYER, Michiqan Human Serv-
ices Network, Lansinq. "How Information and Referral
Systems Impact Responsive ServicerDelivery"
February 19: ROY, RAPPAPORT, Anthroooloov Depart-
ment of Michicgan "On the Structure of Ritual"
February 26: MARK N. OZER, Child Health and De-
velopment, Washinqton, D.C., "Therapy as a Pl-nnin-
Process"
CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN
POLITICAL AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS
MINI-COURSE 310-1 CREDIT
FEB. 9-MARCH 22, Monday niqhts 7:30-10, 25 Angell Hall
FEB. 9-"Broken Treaty at Battle Mountain"
Film and discussion
FEB. 16-"Native Americans and the United States
Government-The View in 1976"
Ernie Stevens, Oneida, Executive Director,
American Indian Policy Review Commission
FEB. 23-"'nside the Bureau of Indian Affairs"
Louis Bruce. Mohawk. former Commissioner
of Indian Affairs
MAR,"1--"ree Hunters of Mistassini"

SC-10-$28.95
fantastic buy in a
scientific model
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD !
We will beat any legitimate local area price quotation on any calcu-
lator in stock on these brands: Hewlett Packard, Texas Instrument,
Kingspoint, Omron, Litronix, Alcor, Sharp

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