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January 29, 1976 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1976-01-29

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Thursday, January 29, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, January 29, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

v

B0 has i
By ANDY GLAZER
Just what can an NCAA school offer a potential
recruit in terms of aid, fees and extras?
The list is short, simple and explicit: Room,
board, tuition, fees,, required textbooks and ma-
terials. Yet this week the word has come out that
Michigan State has been giving away cash, sport
coats, apartments for girl friends, rings, record
albums and several other items closely related to
classwork.
How, then, has Bo Schembechler been able to
mold consistently winning teams in the face of
this peculiarly pecuniary competition from the
northwest? Just what are the steps in the Michigan
t: recruiting process?
"THE THREE THINGS that attract players to
Michigan," said Schembechler, now in his seventh
year as head football coach for the Wolverines," are
academics, our winning tradition, and the excellent
facilities we have here.
"Those are what get a recruit interested. The
crucial point comes when the prospect visits the
campus - does he like the players and coaches he
meets?"
Players and coaches. That means that Michigan
has no one "ace recruiter" like Howard Weyers of
Michigan State.
"Coaches at Michigan," says Schembechler," are
picked first on their ability to coach and teach. We
have a philosophy here-take care of the one's you
have before you worry about the ones you don't."
Obviously, though. recruiting is still a vital factor
in any successful program. And of course, Schem-
bechler must have his entire staff combing the na-
tion during the off season, in the hope of finding a
6-6, 285 pound tackle in a cave in New Mexico, or of
stealing a great athlete right out from under Dar-
rell Royal's nose.
"No, not all all," offered Schembechler. "We'll
AP Photo recruit as far west as Chicago, as far east as New
oss to the York, and as far south as Indiana and Ohio. Some-
times a player from outside that area will contact

70

recruiting woes

us, through some interest in Michigan, and then if
we see that he's the caliber of player we're looking
for, then we'll go ahead and recruit him."
THE DECISION to go after a player is made prin-
ciply through four inputs: High school coaches' re-
commendations, press clippings, films, and the re-
ports of the Michigan coaches themselves (for play-
ers that star within about a 100 mile radius of Ann
Arbor).
Once that decision has been made, Schembechler
and his staff - even his alumni - must be careful
in their recruiting methods.
The NCAA has a fairly new rule that allows a
University only three official visits by ANY repre-
sentative of that University. No longer can a Woody
Hayes visit an Archie Griffin 90 times.
"I talk to everyone who is going to do any recruit-
ing for me to make sure there are so slip-ups,"
said Schembechler, in a marked contrast to the
more poorly organized situation at MSU. "They all
know what we can say to a recruit, and how often
we can say it.
"We can phone all we want to, and if we acci-
dentally bump into a prospect, we're allowed to
say hello - the NCAA calls it the 'Rule of Civility'
--lt we can't mention Michigan.
"THREE VISITS have to be enough, and I'm sure
it makes things a lot easier on the athletes that
wav...
The NCAA allows 95 campus visits (total) for
nrospective student-athletes. And there are literal-
lv hundreds of good football players that must be
considered, at least briefly. How, then, is the final
decision of who should be offered a tender made?
"There are a lot of things we consider," said
Schembechler. "We have meetings twice a week to
compare prospects from different areas, and those
give us a pretty good idea, technically, of the qual-
itv of the football nlavers that we are dealing with.
"But a lot of other factors enter into that final
decision. Who we get commitments from first often
matters, but most importantly, no one, no matter

how talented, is given a grant-in-aid unless I am
impressed by him in the personal meeting I have
with each candidate.
"I TURNED down a lot of coaching offers coming
out of Miami (Ohio) before I accepted the Michigan
job, and I turned them down because I wanted to
coach at a school where I did not have to compro-
roise my position with the athletes.
"I never told Rick Leach he would start as a
freshman here. Some coaches will tell all thirty re-
cruits that they will probably start. I don't work
things that way.
"I wanted the school and the program to have
enough going for them so that I wouldn't have to
do anything improper or illegal.
"IF I TURN down a job so as not to compromise
my principles, I'm not about to do it with an indi-
vidual player. I want players that I know are fine
individuals." Schembechler paused to answer the
phone.
"Oh, hello, John, what's going on." He stopped
to listen for 20 seconds or so.
"Oh, don't worry about that, John. We'll graduate
you. You just do what you have to do, and we'll get
you through. Don't worry about it."
AFTER saying goodbye, Schembechler turned and
said, "that was John Ceddia (a reserve quarterback
who has seen virtually no action in his varsity
career). He just had a shoulder operation and is
going to have to drop some classes while he's re-
cuperating.
"He was worried that dropping the classes
wouldn't let him graduate, but since it is a football
injury, I told him not to worry, that we'd just ex-
tend his grant."
One recalls Schembechler's earlier comment
about "taking care of the one's you have." It be-
comes apparent what Bo uses to compete with
other school's money. It's called class.

Herb Brown, the Detoit Piston's new head coa ch, is shown duing the Piston's 87-84 1o
Chicago Bulls last night.

Join The Daily Sports Staff

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Bulls squeeze

by

Pistons

16-game cage stats
FG-FGA PCT FT-FTA PCT.

By The Associated Press drive. A jumper by Marin with
DETROIT - Forward. Jack 1:11 to go proved to be the win-
Marin hit 11 of his 16 points in ning shot. Marin later added a
the fourth quarter to help the free throw with 11 seconds to
Chicago Bulls beat the Detroit go to put the game out of reach.
Pistons 87-84 in the National Mickey Johnson and Bob Love
Basketball Association I a s t each added 15 points for the
night.. Bulls, while Bob Lamer led De-
The victory, the 14th in 45 trait with 20 points.
games for the Bulls, who have ', 2 *n
the poorest record in the league, I5 SLOt
was their second in a row, only
the third time they've accom-, BOSTON-John Havlicek's 17
plished the feat this season. points paced a balanced Boston
The Pistons suffered their I attack, and the Celtics erupted
fourth straight loss and second for 69 points in the second half
in a row under new coach last night, rolling to a 110-9
Herb Brown. National Basketball Association
The Bulls took the lead for victory over the Atlanta Hawks.
good at 73-72 on two free throws Charlie Scott and Kevin Sta-
by Steve Patterson midway com had 15 points each and
through the final period. Then Dave Cowens contributed 14 as
they mounted a six-point ad-, the Celtics posted their fourth
vantage with the shooting of tonsecutive victory and seventh
Marin, who hit two quick bas- in their last eight games.
kets. That countered a streak Led by Lou Hudson and rookie
by Detroit's John Mengelt, who Bill Willoughby, Atlanta broke
at one point in the closing away from a 25-25 tie with 10
period had eight straight points. straight points en route to a
Detroit never could get closer 48-41 halftime lead.
than two points in the stretch Havlicek tipped in a re-
Improved women s
osg
Compete nN'wester

z
7
1.
i,
.
i'
i
.i

bound to pull Boston even 58-}
58 after 4% minutes of the1
third period. Then Bostonl
charged in front with a 10-4
surge in which five different1
Celtics scored.
Starting the fourth period with1
a 72-66 lead, the Celtics widened
the advantage to as much as
16 poonts, 97-81, before Atlanta1
chopped the final margin. Sta- l
com scored 11 points in the
final quarter after Scott had to.
retire with a .twisted ankle. -
Tom Van Arsdale led Atlanta
scorers with 24 points before
fouling out late in the game.
Hudson finished with 18 points.
* * *

Green
Hubbard
with seven minutes to play in Robinson
the third quarter. But Ed Rat- Britt
leff scored 11 points in the third Grote
Baxtr
quarter for the Rockets who Thompson
then rolled to a 102-79 lead with Hardy
5:05 to play. Rudy Tomjanovich Bergen
totaled 20 points for Houston. Isaton
Cleveland, which missed a Scatn
chance to tie Washington for Liliard
first place in the NBA's Central:
Division, was led by Nate Thur- rev
mond with 15 points in a relief -r -v
role.

124-247
105-197
88-154
84-174
75-150
40-74
32-72
14-26
6-15
2-2
3-8
1-3
0-0

.502
.533
.571
.483
.500
.541
.444
.538
.400
1.000
.375
.333
.000

50-62
36-54
50-60)
19-28
31-43
16-19
8-12
2-10
9-10
1-2
1-2
1-2
0-0

.806
.667
.833
.679
.721
.842
.667
.200
.900
.500
.500
.500
.000

PTS.
304
246
226
187
181
96
72
30
21
7
3
0

AVE.
19.0
15.4
14.1
11.7
11.3
6.0
4.5
2.3
1.6
1.7
0.9
0.6
0.0

RES.
53
174
128
71
50
16
55
11
16
0
1
2
2

POETRY READING
with CAROLINE GREGORY
reading from her works
Thurs., ,tan. 29th-7:30 p.m
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
refreshments

.TRE"".

x9 '

Matmen meet the best

PIRGIM thanks those who have supported its
public interest work.
For those who wish not to fund, PIRGIM announces a
PIRGIM FEE REFUND
1. Your tuition bill shows the $1.50 PIRGIM fee.
2. To eliminate the fee
a. simply fill out the enclosed card (or any piece of
paper) ..
b. with your name, i.d. number, signature,
c. and send or take the card.. .
d. to the Student Accounts Office (2nd floor SAB) or
the Cashier (lobby, L.S. & A. bldg.),
e. ANY time this term. h
(we hope, of course, you will want to support our activities
as set out elsewhere in this paper.)

By MICHAEL WILSON
Michigan's women gymnasts
take their show on the road to
Evanston, Illinois this week end
for the Northwestern Invitation
Women's Gymnastic Meet,
This weekend's tournament,
the third for the two - year old
squad, consists of twenty-two
teams from around the Mid-
west. Each team was placed
into a beginning, intermediate,
or advanced division with Mich-
igan being placed into the in-
termediate division.

'r
}

ficial sanction and thus become
intercollegiate sport.)
Laatsch then related a long

Rockets roar By BOB MILLER Hawkeyes will be critical if
HOUSTON - T h e Houston What could be harder than Michigan is to win. Although the
Rockets, led by Calvin Mur- facing the number one team in Wolverines were soundly beaten
phy's 26 points, outscored Cleve- the country? The answer; facing last year, the matmen are better
land 17-2 in the first five min- TWO number one teams, natu- prepared to give Iowa all they'
utes of the third quarter and rally. This is the prospect facing can handle this time around.
rallied to beat the Cavaliers the Michigan wrestlers in their The Iowa lineup is awesome
108-93 last night in the National next two matches when they with such heralded stars as Tim
Basketball Association. tangle with Iowa and Northern Cysewski, Midlands Tournament
Houston was behind 49-48 at Iowa. I champion at 126 lbs., Brad
the half, but held a 65-61 lead The Wolverines begin their Smith, 142 lbs., second in the
hurculean task of dethroning the same tournament, defending na-
Division I and II kingpins when tional champion Chuck Yagla
ym ni asti s they travel to Cedar Falls Thurs- 150) and NCAA runnerup Chris
day to face Northern Iowa. Campbell (177).
But Michigan is not without
COACH Bill Johannesen con- their team of performers that
11 . cedes that Division II wrestling have led them to an undefeated
LA L'YL.U --I.. -'..' is not on a par 'with Division I, conference mark thus far in the
but is quick to add that "theys
squad now is to convince the a good team, certainly not As Johannesen pointed out,
Athletic Department that the in- a pushover." The lineups for "We match up very well (with
AvetD artment well rth the Michigan will remain the same Iowa). Our very tough wrestlers
vestment was well worth the as the matches against Illinois are the same weight as theirs."
price. and Ohio State. Amos Goodlowe "We could conceivably win
The real test comes in three should see some action, but he seven (of ten) matches," adding'
weeks, when Michigan will host and teammate Brad Holman "it will be a good test of our
a women's gymnastic exhibition have knee problems, forcing iphysical abilities."
at the Coliseum. During the Coach Johannesen to supple-1
February 21 meet," Coach Lo- ment his team with two reserves. ONCE AGAIN Michigan should
ken explained, "we'll introduce The only other foreseeable be led by their captain Mark
the public tthe world of (wo- lineup switch will be Rich Val- Johnson and freshman Mark
men's) gymnastics." ley wrestling against Iowa, in Chrella. Johannesen came out
"We have to make a good place of Karl Briggs who will and stated that "Johnson must
s h o w," Laatsch maintained. I start at Northern Iowa. win if we are to have a chance
"They (the Athletic Depart- Coach Johannesen is optimistic against Iowa."
ment) gave us a lot to work about his team's chances at The true key to victories in
with and they are expecting Cedar Falls, but he is cautious Iowa will be consistency. If
some results." about looking ahead. After the Michigan can win some of the
According to the coaching Northern Iowa meet, the Maize close individual matches, they
staff, the Wolverne tumblers areand Blue grapplers move across will have a good shot at knock-
stff, theattainingahighbleselre the state on Friday to Iowa ing off Iowa. They must not
quickly attaining a high level City, home of the best wrestling only win the tough matches, but
of gymnastic quality. "For the squad in the country, the Uni- take the 158 and 167 weight
first year I think they are do- versity of Iowa. classes, which Johannesen be-

hassle that followed the letter
but eventually the Athletic De-
partment responded with new
equipment, accommodations for
pra:tice sessions and a three-
man coaching staff which in-
cludes Newt Loken, the head
coach of t h e championship
men's squad, Bruce Keeshin, a
'former co-captain at Michigan,
and Linda Morton, a top-rated
coach from the Ann Arbor
"When we became intercol-
legiate, we didn't expect to get
all of this," Laatsch said as she
mentioned the Coliseum section
stacked with brand new equip-
ment and mats.
"We've got a real good
coaching staff," Laatsch com-
mented. "It's worked out real-
ly well."
The challenge facing the

In addition, the wrestling
squad must stay.healthy through-
out the road trip. The wrestlers
were hit with an early barrage
of injuries that put holes in their
lineup. But now they are reason-
ably well off, despite losing their
heavyweight, Mitch Marsicano,
who will be red shirted to be
eligible for next season.
As if it weren't enough to have
to face two number one teams
on the road in successive nights,
Michigan will not have a chance
to catch their breath before it
is off to Minneapolis for a triple
dual meet with Air Force, Man-
kato State, currently ranked
fourth in Division II standings,
and the 'host team, the Univer-
sity of Minnesota.
TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY
SHOWCASE
PRODUCTION
OOT
JOE ORTON
JAN 28-31
8:00p.m.
ARENA THEATRE
$2.00 Gen.Adm.I
Advance sales through PTP Ticket Office
located in lobby of Mendelssohn Theatre
Building. Mon: Fri.10 &.m.-1 p.m.,25p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Ticket Office
(313)764-0450

Regardless of
end's results,I
team has shown
provement over
squad. Michigant
season, has lost
Michigan in a
dual meet and
enth in the Fig

this week-
this year's
marked im-
last year's
thus far this
to Western
scrimmage-
niaced sev-
Ten tourna-

CLEAR UP YOUR FUTURE IN THE 2-YEAR AFROTC PROGRAM.
What's up after college? That question is enough to
get a lot of young people down.
Air Force ROTC college graduates have that worry,
too. But their immediate future (and longer if they choose)
is much more secure. As a commissioned officer, there's a
good job.. ..Travel. Graduate level education. Promotions.
Financial security. And really, lots more. .
If you have two academic years remaining, there's a
great 2-year AFROTC program still available to you. Look
into the details. We think you'll be pleasantly surprised.
And pleasantly rewarded.
AFROTC, NORTH HALL, Phone 164-2403
Put it all together in Air Force ROTC.

ment last December.
Women's gymnastics was ini-
tiated last year when a group of
women got together and decid-
ed to form a team. "Marie
Hartwig, (Director of Women's
Athletics at Michigan) told us
what to do to become intercl-
legiate." junior Linda Laatsch
said. "We went to two meets
and hosted a third. Then we
wrote to tie Fo'rd in Control
of Tnter-nillciat Aftlntics at
Michi qn" (to reo'uest an of-

ing great," K e e s h i n said. JOHANNESEN believes every
"They're a bunch of hard-work- individual match against the
ing people.

lieves to be Iowa's only weak
snots.
I

,
,
a
1
a
s

!

.I

WHlY WALK FARTHER!
LEVI'S BRAND

l

NOON LUNCHEON
(Homemade soup & sandwich 50c)
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
State Representative
PERRY BULLARD:
"SECRET POLICE IN MICHIGAN"
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE

Available at
Wild's Varsity Shop

FEATURING:
e Cordurovs
" Denim Bells
* Brush Denims

" Panatella Work Shirts
Knit Slaks " flannel Shirts
. Boot Jeans
* Pre-Wash Slaks * Denim Jackets

.

1l

I sc REs
Notre Damne 89. DePatii 68
Clemson 88.Ft,'man 85
De'troit :103, Wayne Stat~e 67

I

JANUARY SALE

Wild's Varsity Shop
311 S. STATE STREET
S*PREPAREFOR ----.--------------"....
E C F-MG G -FL EX '-,
" .AT J "RA mcnP.ncT ine

THETA XI-The Coed House
1354 WASHTENAW
(the house with the big white pillars)

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