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January 28, 1976 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-28

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 28, 1976

Page EIght THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 28, 1976

City feels rock salt pinch
as ice covers local roads

By MIKE NORTON
The city's icy streets may be peppered
with salt today, but by next month, they may
be sorely lacking in the gritty substance.
According to Hubert Haley, maintenance
manager for the city's Department of Stretts,
Traffic, and Parking, Ann Arbor may not
have escaped the salt shortage that has
caught other cities n the state.
IN FACT, if the weather doesn't improve
in the next few weeks, residents may find
some local streets difficult to navigate.
"We've got some salt," said Haley, "but
the company rations it to us. We're limited to
about 90 tons a day. We've got a little of the
stuff stockpiled, so I guess you could say
we're holding our own, but this weather
lately has been something else."
Haley said that the Washtenaw County
Roads Department can't obtain salt from any
nearby sources. "They're bringing it in from
somewhere in Toledo."

According to Haley, the problem seems to
be one of run-off. Ice and snow may melt on
any particular day, but the excess water al-
ways freezes before it can escape into
sewers.
"WE KNEW this shortage was coming,"
Haley admitted, "and we were ready for it-
but if we don't get some run-off soon I don't
know what's going to happen. It's been a
very bad winter so far."
Haley said the city is getting its entire
supply of salt this year from International
Salt of Clark Summit, Penn.
However, this is not the usual practice.
"Ordinarily, we get half our order from
International, and half from Morton Salt,"
he said. "But Morton had a big strike this
summer and their stockpiles are low. Besides,
they haul the stuff over from Canada by
barge, and with the river frozen up none of
the barges can get through."

House
overrides
Ford
veto
(Continued from Page 1)
have set the funding at a level
$424 million below that speci-
fied in the measure but still
$491 million above Ford's bud-
recommendation.
Minority Leader John Rhodes
(R-Ariz.) said he was confi-
dent Ford would sign such a
bill. But Democrats argued
even this amount of funding
would require cutbacks in vital
programs.
REP. Daniel Flood (D-Pa.)
handling the bill, said it rep-
resented an average increase of
7 per cent over amounts appro-
priated a year earlier for the
same programs.

Save
$400

Senate confirms
Republican Bush
as new CIA chief

'Nashville', 'Lyndon':
best films of 1975

(Continued from Page 1)
Bush should eliminate his can-
didacy" and warned of "the
harm t h i s appointment will
cause the whole effort to re-
form and strengthen the Central
Intelligence Agency."
Bush's two immediate prede-
cessors-Colby and former De-
fense Secretary James Schles-
inger-were ousted in last No-
vember's administration shake-
up. Richad Helms, who headed
the agency until 1973, is now
under investigation by the Jus-
tice Department.
HELMS, NOW ambassador to
Iran, told the Senate Govern-
ment Operations Committee yes-
terday that members of Con-
gress sometimes did not wish
to be told about the CIA's
"dirty tricks."
"On occasion they really
didn't want to know all that
much about it because it could
be embarrassing to them po-
litically" if exposed, Helms told
the Senate Government Opera-
tions Committee.
Senate approval of Bush came
nearly three months after he
was nominated. Several Demo-
cratic senators had said that
Bush's political past should dis-
qualify him from holding the
highly sensitive post.
Before the vote Senate Ma-
jority leader Mike Mansfield
told reporters the Bush nomi-
nation would be approved eas-'
ily, although "there will be a de-
cided number of votes against
him."
IN AN EFFORT to quiet con-
cerns that Bush's political am-
bitions would further injure pub-
lic confidence in the CIA, Pres-
ident Ford has ruled Bush out
as a possible vice presidential
running mate in 1976.

Mansfield said he was "not
concerned about a politician be-
ing named to that office" and
said he believes Bush will rise
above politics once he takes on
the job.
Sen. Thomas McIntyre (D-
N.H.), one of four members of
the Senate A r m e d Services
Committee who opposed the
nomination even after Bush was
removed from vice presidential
consideration, argued that "ap-
pointment of so clearly per-
ceived a political figure" was
"certain to insure skepticism."
McINTYRE pointed out that
Bush would be the fourth man
to head the CIA in the last three
years. Although Ford's promise
that Bush would not be his run-'
ning mate seemed to assure
that Bush would head the CIA
for the rest of the current ad-
ministration "where is the guar-
antee of tenure if anyone other
than President Ford is sworn
in" on January 20, 1977, McIn-
tyre asked.

(Continued from Page 5
should have been a pie
(junk.
Even though I don't b
it stands with the finest e
of 1975, The Wind and the
a surprisingly beautiful fi
John Milius, neverthele
mains fresh in my mind a
single viewing last summ
Revolving loosely aroun
incident involving a Mar
and Teddy Roosevelt, Miliu
defied all odds and turne
an epic in the great Beau
tradition. Sean Conneryi
noble and dashing Raisuli,
Candice Bergen finally dis
her niche in this film a
wife of an American diplon
THE RESULT is a mo
robust and adventuresome
it seems a modern rer
from an era long lost.
scenery is expansive to the
of being awesome, provid
background for Connery
Brian Keith (as Rooseve
face off in an internation
fair that classically pit
wind against the lion.

'e of
elieve
efforts
Lion,
lm by
s re-
fter a
er.
nd an
ro-,can
us has
ed out
Geste
is the
while
covers
s the
mat.

Perhaps an intermittent does
of pure adventure fantasy does
us all some good, and by its own
spirit and unique charm, The
Wind and the Lion somehow
fills a void that has existed for
all too long.
WINTER DEATHS
HOUSTON (UPI) - Winter
storms from 1936 to 1969 killed
more than 3,000 persons in the
country, according, to National
Weather Service figures.
Fewer than 400 of the
fatalities were the result of
cold or exposure, the NWS said.
Car accidents in the bad wea-
ther caused one third of the fa-
talities.

GRADUATE STUDY IN
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public
Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin,
offers an interdisciplinary graduate program
which is student oriented and research based,
focusing on relevant public problems and issues,
and leads to the master's degree in public
affairs.
Applications for admission and for fellow-
ships, awarded on the basis of merit and need,
are now being accepted. Deadline for applica-
tion is March 15.
A representative of the LBJ School will be at
the Office of Placement at
University of Michigan
January 28, 1976
9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

vie so The worst year for winter re-
e that lated deaths was 1960, when
mnant 354 persons died.
The --
point
ding aJ
r and
lt) to
alaf-
s the CLEARANCE
MEN'S
FLORSHEIMS,
$24.80 to $36.80
j DEXTER,
$18.90 to $21.80
WOMEN'S
SNOW BOOTS,
$14.90 to $28.90
SPORT SHOES,
$10.90 to $18.90
0
Mast's Shoes
619 E. LIBERTY
662-0266
217 S. MAIN
662-6326

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TICKETS GO ON SALE TODAY
UAC Presents (1 night only!)
BOB SEGER
& the SILVER BULLET BAND
FOGHAT
CRISLER ARENA Wed., Feb. 11,8 p.m.

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