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January 08, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-08

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Thursday, January 8, 19 lb

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thrsay JnuryS,19lbTH MCHGA DtL PgeThe

Court
(Continued from Page 1)
N I X 0 N ' S attorneys had,
charged that an angry, frustrat-'
ed Congress "found him guilty
and then punished him" by

reje

i

recordings during his 5 years
in the White House were his
personal property and he need-
ed them for his memoirs.

passing a law seizing his per- THE judges recommended
sonal papers and tapes in the that Nixon be given a hand in
wake of the Watergate scandal. separating private and public!
After he resigned from office, materials and a chance to chal-i
Nixon filed suit in 1974 chal- lenge decisions made by the ar-,
lenging the constitutionality of chivists.
the law. The court also allowed Nixon
Nixon said the more than 40 to make copies of "documen-
million pages of presidential tary" material while the case
papers and 5,000 hours of tape goes to the Supreme Court. One
Domestic car sales
slump during

-ts papers
lawyer familiar with the dispute ed that they would appeal, pro-I
said that considerably expand- bably in the high court's ses-1
ed Nixon's current access and sion beginning next fall.
would permit him to complete The legal battle over the Nix-
a book now in the works on his on materials began almost si-
White House years. multaneously with his resigna-
The 106-page opinion was tion from the White House Aug.,
written by U. S. Appeals Court 9, 1974. Aides to President Ford
Judge Carl MacGowan. Anoth- worked out a double-key ar-i
er appeals court judge, Edward rangement under which Nixonj
Tamm and U. S. District Judge and government officials would
Aubrey Robinson Jr. joined in have mutual access to the
the ruling. tapes and documents, whichi
would have been stored near;
THEY said the Nixon ma- Nixon's San Clemente, Calif.,i
terials, except for limited pur- home.

lea
Special Watergate Prosecutor
Leon Jaworski objected, saying
some materials were needed
for criminal prosecutions and
expressing doubts that they
would be available if Nixon re-
tained control.
Nixon went to court seeking
possession of the materials. On
Dec. 19, 1974, President Ford
signed the Presidential Re-
cordings and Materials Act, giv-
ing the government possession
and ordering the General Serv-
ices Administration to set out
rules for public access.

.
i

(Continued from Page 1)
fidence and industrial activity
up from a year ago, the outlook
for 1976 is highly encouraging
and we expect auto sales will
outperform the general econo-
GIANT General Motors was

the only U.S. automaker to top
1974 levels with sales of 3,747,009
cars, a slight 1.4 per cent gain.
Ford sales slinped 10 per cent,
Chrysler was off 17 per cent and
American Motors came within 4
per cent of matching 1974.
*Sales s in 1970 were below 1975's
16TAvi T lii'1onaomesuc saiesn~

poses, would remain locked up
pending a Supreme Court ap-
peal: Nixon's lawyers confirm-
MATTERS TO BUYERS
NEW YORK (AP) - A na-
tionwide survey, conducted for
the Plastic Bottle Institute,
shows that safety is one of the
most important reasons for the
growing popularity of products
packaged in plastic.
The survey, done by Techni-
cal Analysis and Communi-
cations Inc., consisted of a ran-
dom sampling of 300 families
in both rural and urban areas.
It involved the study of atti-
tudes towards all types of bot-
tles in their homes.
"Interestingly," says John
Malloy, PBI's staff director,
"the survey showed that safety
was equally important to wom-
en without small children as it
was to women with young chil-
dren."

I

FRIDAY NIGHT at H ILLI
JANUARY 8th
5:00-MINYAN DAVENING
5:30-RAMAH DAVENING
6:00-REFORM SERVICE
7:00-COMMUNITY SHABBAT
DINNER
8:30-ONEG SHABBAT
Speaker: PROF. YOCHANON PERES
"ISRAEL AND THE
OCCUPIED TERRITORIES"
-REFRESHMENTS-

EL
p.m.

AP'Photo
See Ronnie ran
Presidential hopeful Ronald Reagan campaigns yesterday in New Hampshire where he hopes
to best President Gerald Ford in the first primary of this election year. Reagan, the former
governor of California, is finishing up a three-day swi-ag th:ough th^ state. The primary is not
until the end of next month but may be crucial to Reagan's insurgent challenge to Ford.
State House to consider bill
cutting pot possession peralty

level for both domestic sale
<. . ...and total sales, but they were
Daily Official Bulletill affected by a 67-day strike
............: i against GM. The past year's
Thursday, January 8 sales were affected by the en-
Day Calendar
WUOM: 1776 and All That-Brit- ergy cris, big price hikes and a
ish journalists, Paul Scott Rankine recession that pushed the indus-
& Patrick Brogan, argue "Was the
American Revolution Necessary?" 10 try into a two-year slump it
am. finally pulled out of with the
Music School: Faculty Recital-
Leslie Guinn, baritone, Wallace introduction of the 1976 models.
Berry, pianist, Recital Hall, 8 pm. - -
General Notices
Att. U-M Faculty Members: Dur-
Ing Winter Term, Michigan Me-
moral - Phoenix Project will make
a limited number of grants for re-
search in peaceful uses of nuclear
energy, inc. work in social, physi-
cal, & biological sciences. Requests M (
priate. Grants may cover equip-
ment, supplies, research assistance,
& field trips, not salary or publica-
tion expenses. only projects rated'GE R E AS
"excellent" or "very good" by Di- GEORGE WASH
, isional Review Boards likely to beI
cnd*ere for funding. Priority were TEDDY RO
goes to:1) new faculty, particular-
ly those seeking research support DWIG H T E I SEN
from outside agencies, 2) establish-
ed faculty opening a new area of
research. Lower priority goes to fac-
ulty who have received extensive
Phoenix support. Return applica- AmerCan solid
tions to Phoenix Project by Fri., A eia o
Jan. 30, 1976. Grants will be made
by April 1, 1976. Application blanks Revolutionary W
now available at Phoenix Project
office, Phoenix Memorial Lab, North received a vete
Campus, 764-6213.

Please
Friday

make reservations for Dinner by 1
-- CALL 663-3336.

w

raw..

IIGAN FROSH & SOPHOMORES

(Continued from Page 1)
jail sentence and $100 fine.-
THE - BILL, should it pass,r
would give Michigan one of the
most progressive marijuana,
laws in the nation. States with;
similar laws are Alaska, Cali-,
fornia, Colorado, Maine, Ohio, s
and Oregon.
If enacted the bill would pro-
vide for:
0 traffic ticket type cita-!
tions instead of arrests for pos-.
session of less than 100 grams;]
* no criminal records for
persons convicted of possessing
less than 100 grams, if the fine
is paid;
" a probation period for
those convicted of possession of
less than 100 grams. Further
possession of marijuana would
result in a 90-day jail sentence.
WE ARE BACK !
Dave, Chet
and Harold
UM Stylists
at the UNION

This clause emerged as a
compromise between legislators,
and State Police, who said
they would support the mea-
sure only with the inclusion of
a jail sentence. The Civil Rights3
committee offered the proba-
tionary period in lieu of a man-
datory prison term.
DURING the hearings a num-{
ber of other law enforcement
agencies expressed their sup-
port for the bill, including Ing-
ham County Sheriff Kenneth'

Preadmore and Genessee Coun-
ty Prosecutor Robert Leonard.
Most of the law enforcement
officers said the bill will allow
them to concentrate on more
serious crimes. According to
State Police, between 1971 and
1974 total arrests for hard
drugs rose 4 per cent while
those for marijuana offenses in-
creased 92 per cent.
The major biblical prophets
are: Isaias, Jeremias, Ezekiel
and Daniel.

INGTON was an Army Officer, so
)OSEVELT, HARRY TRUMAN and
HOWER.
;HER became the first f e m a I e
5r when she loaded cannon in a
ar battle against the Brittish (She
ran's pension for her troubles as

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t , -- _ ___.____ _ .__ ..___ ._ ..--_. _..----__-_. ____.___ __.__, _.

I
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Fine

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f

WEST SIDE

7 ROOK SHOP
113 W. LIBERTY-995-1891
Used, Rare, & Out-of-Print
Books Bought and Sold
e MODERN FIRSTS
* POETRY . MUSIC
" AMERICANA
o POLAR EXPLORATION

I did-it-myself
at Megaframes.
x r jr , :n
nI n c ..
.vewell he
t« f ; n s penty of
pr n '2 -: ad a lld*.,i lit
205 N. MAIN STREET * ANN ARBORMICH.
PHONE 769-942

Perhaps you are missing a bet in not picking up a
commission as an Army Officer while here at the
Uo
University of Michigan.

I

I

t ..
S- j

It's not too late to start the Army Officer Educa-
tion Program if you are willing to play a little catch
up. It won't interfere with your regular program,
provides leadership / management training and
opens the possibility for a rewarding time. No obli-
gation in Frosh/Sophomore years.
Seriously, you are missing an opportunity. Call
Lieutenant Colonel "Dick" Parker or "Mitch"
Mazur, 764-2400/2401, for information.

MON.-SAT. 11:00 A.M.-6:30 P.M.
THURS. & FRI. NITES TIL 9:00 P.M.

t2 BOK 3L
FOR A FEW DAYS ONLY (z)
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OPPORTUNITY . . .
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LOEB Library Excepted0
(2). All Sales Final
S e in

M63

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LET AATA MEET YOUR TRANSPORTATION NEEDS
LINE BUS
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