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January 22, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-22

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Thursday, January 22, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, January 22, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page -Three

'

-.

Hearst trial
delay p ossible

SAN FRANCISCO (P) - The
starting date for Patricia
Hearst's bank robbery trial was
in doubt yesterday with thet
announcement -that the trial
judge is undergoing surprise
surgery after a routine check-
up.
Lawyers for the jailed heiress
were left outside a locked
courtroom when a pretrial hear-
ing scheduled for yesterday
morning was postponed. Anoth-
er hearing with a substitute
judge was set for later in the
day, but it was unclear whether
pending defense motions would,
be dealt with.
"I'm beginning to have my
doubts," said chief defense at-
torney F. Lee Bailey when ask-
ed if he believed Hearst's trial
would start on schedule next
Monday. She is charged with
the April 1974 holdup of a Hi-
bernja Bank branch here.
THE TRIAL schedule -Was
placed in question when it was
disclosed that U. S. District
Court Judge Oliver Carter was
to have undergone minor sur-
gery for an undisclosed vascu-
lar ailment in his neck. He had
entered a hospital on Monday
for a routine physical examina-
tion.
Carter's secretary maintain-
ed the 64-year-old judge intend-
ed to be on hand for the trial
Monday morning. But his ab-
sence yesterday morning left
unresolved for the moment de-
fense motions challenging the
qualifications of a government
psychiatrist and seeking to have
lie detector evidence admitted
as evidence.
The pretrial hearing was set
despite a second meeting Tues-
day between Hearst and Dr.
Harry Kozol, the Boston psy-
chiatrist she claimed badgered
her to tears during an inter-
view two weeks ago. He inter-
viewed her for four hours at the
San Mateo County Jail, where
she has been held since her
capture here on Sept. 18.
DEFENSE attorney Albert

Johnson said the interview
took place "without incident"
but added the defense still in-
tended to challenge Kozol's
qualifications.
Also at issue was the admis-
sibility of polygraph tests of
Hearst. The tests were believ-
ed to support the defense con-
tention that she was indeed in
fear of her life when she took
part in the bank robbery with
members of the Symbionese Li-
beration Army, the terrorists
who kidnaped her nearly two
years ago.
Admission of such tests as
evidence in the federal court's
Northern District of California
is, unprecedented. But Bailey
has fought successfully for ad-
.nission of such tests in otherj
trials.
HEARST gave sworn testi-
mony last week that Kozol har-
rassed her to the point of hys-
teria during their first inter-
view. Kozol, himself under
oath, denied the allegations.
"We still think the courtj
should disqualify him as an ex-
pert," Johnson said. He had
promised earlier to presents
"newly discovered evidence"
yesterday that would challenge1
Kozol's qualifications to ex-
amine Hearst. .
The attorney said that
Hearst's decision to meet
with the doctor for a second
time was in response to the
trial judge's order that she co-
operate.
"We had three options," John-
son said. "One was to refuse
to have him examine her at
all. One was to appeal to the
9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
One was to allow the doctor to
go in under very stringent safe-
guards and guarantees."
He said the government of-
fered the guarantees late Mon-
day night, and the defense de-
cided on the third option.
Kozol is one of several psy-
chiatrists who have interviewed
Hearst for possible expert tes-
timony about her mental state.

Inflation drops to
PS t
below1974.high
WASHINGTON (P) - Inflation+ wide variety of consumer se
cost American consumers seven ices were responsible for m
cents on the dollar in 1975 and of the December increase.
President Ford saidayesterday FOOD PRICES rose thr
it will cost them another 5.9 tenths compared with as
esthis year.But 1974 and tenths per cent jump the p
1973 when inflation clipped 21 vious month. Non-food com
cents off the dollar's purchas- udities rose three-tenths, eq
ing powering increases in each oft
Final year-end figures from three previous months. Servi
the Labor Department showed increased six-tenths following
the rise in consumer prices 4.1 per cent jump in Nove
slowed in December, increasing ber.
five-tenths of one per cent. The indexes for the three n
For all of 1975, prices rose jor components of the consu
seven per cent , down from the er price index - food, comn
12.2 per cent jump in 1974 and dities other than food, and se
the smallest yearly increase ices - all rose less in 1975 th
since 1972 when prices rose 3.4 1974.
per cent. Over the year ,the food in
WHITE HOUSE Press Secre- rose 6.5 per cent, compa
tary Ron Nessen said the fig- with 12.2 per cent in 19
[ures show that inflation is mod- Prices of services rose 8.11
erating. cent compared with 11.3 1
"It is still higher than the cent a year earlier. Nonfi
President would like but it is commodities showed 6.21
better than in the last two cent increase during 1975, 1
years," he told reporters. Nes- than half the 13.2 per cent
sen added that the administra- ure recorded in 1974.
tion believes "the outlook is -
quite good" for the economic
recovery in 1976.
In presenting Congress With
Teew budget, President Ford
-rpdicted a further drop in the
inflation rate this year - to 5.9
per cent.

THlE MICHIGAN DIAILY
Volume LXXXV No. 96
Thursday, January 22, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 164-0562. Second class postage
pei1d at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
vtiblished d a i i y Tuesday through
Sunday mrning during the Univer-
rv-t '.vitat 420 Maynard Street, Ann
rv- . rbor, Michigan 4109. Subscription
ost .cs. sl$ Sept. tLru April (2 semes-
r ai $13 by mal outside Ann Ar-
Nor
ee- unumer session published Tues-
e.day through Saturday niorning.
six- Subscriptu rates: $6.50 in Ann
pre- Arbor; $7.50 by wail outside Ann
mo- Arur
u a l- - - _ _ __ . ._ __.. __
the John Lucas, a senior from
ces Durham, N.C., led Duke's bas-
g a ketball scorers with a 19.5 point
m- average last season and is back
for his final season with the
B111 i)N7l

ma-
um-
mo-
erv-
han
idex
red
974.
per
per
food
per
ess.
fig-

mue Dnevus.
We have our
reputation
to protect.
UM Stylists
at the UNION,
Chet, Harold,
and Dave

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Bill banning f n sale roin

state to reach Hou

1

By PAUL EISENSTEIN
Special to The Daily
LANSING - The House Pub-
lic Health Committee will re-
sume hearings next week, on
a bill introduced by Rep. Perry
Bullard (D-Ann Arbor) which
would halt the sale within Mich-

reivsed bill which would just
ban the sale of fluorocarbon pro- i
pelled aerosols anywhere with-
in the state, rather than a ban:
of manufacture and sale," saidI
Bullard. The target date is now
January, 1977.

(C P (I f f~f !INFLATION had averaged
two to three per cent a year
during most of the post-World
dustry's reticence to accept the War II period before prices
ban. "I think this is an example gained momentum in the late
of the problem of our profit 1960s.
based corporate structure," he The seasonally adjusted five-
says. "We're in danger of poi- tenths of a per cent increase in
soning ourselves and our ecolo- consumer prices last month
gy. "compared with the seven-tenths
The second most popular aero- increase in November and was
sol propellant, vinyl chloride, the smallest monthly rise since
has been banned nationally as September, when prices also
of the first of this year. Tests rose five-tenths of one per cent.
showed it caused a rare liver The government said higher
cancer in rats. orices for some foods and a
- - -

British, French Con
begin supersonic

iguttan Luc alao fl srayspr- THE STRONGEST opposition
igan of all aerosol sprays pro- to Bullard's bill is coming from
pelled by freon. 1 ra e corporainadthsae
If Bullard's bill passes, Mich- r ations and the state
igan would be the second state Chamber of Commerce. That
to regulate the sale of fluoro- organization's representativest
caron (freon) aerosols. Oregon claim passage of the bill would
was the first state to pass such cost 193 state jobs.
a bill last year, phasing out DuPont, the world's largest
fluorocarbon aerosols by March, freon manufacturer, has mount-
1977. ed a major campaign to delay
After a similar bill failed two any state or federal legislativea
years ago, "We've- submitted a action.
_____------------------ Recent findings have shown
that freon damages the earth's
e{S ozone layer, which. filters dead-:
c. rd lv ultraviolet radiation coming
rdefrom the sun. A reduction of
the ozone layer of one or two,
per cent by 1985 has been pre-
S dicted. A one per cent reduc-
tion could cause up to 20,000
new skin cancer cases each
"Never have so many coughed year, say experts.
up so much for so few." An
anti-Concorde group was report- DR..RALPH CICERONE, Uni-
ed staking out the flight path versity research scie tist, says,I
west of Heathrow with noise- "I see freon as a more formid-
monitoring devices. able threat to the ozone than
Jonathan Cavenna, a 30-year- ithe A-bomb tests of the '60's."
Jonathan Cavenna, and 30yer- Cicerone has testified that a
old office worker and father of three to five per cent ozone!
idtwo who earns $6,000 a year, reduction could be reached by'
said it would take him three ;1990 even if a ban began im-
,years to pay back the $1,000'
he hadtto borrow t make the mediately. This reduction, says
heiha tborrhowBrtohmCketrdCicerone, "is serious enough to
flight on the British Concorde. 1set off significant climactic'

.: .
jtil.
}jj ff' r: '' /

TAKE A
BREAK .

in the

.

PARIS (AP) - Britain andi
France began commercial ser-1
vice by their Concorde super-
sonic airliner today with simul-
taneous takeoffs from Paris for
Rio de Janeiro and from Lon-
don for the Persian Gulf.
The British Airways flight
reached Bahrain in three hours,
3 minutes - more than three
hours faster than the speediest
subsonic jet. Air France's Con-
torde was 7 minutes ahead of
schedule stopping at Dakar,
Senegal, to refuel enroute to
Rio de Janeiro.
The only mishap reported was
that the speed indicator in the
passenger compartment of the
British jet stuck at about 450
miles an hour and refused to
budge when the plane broke the.
sound barrier, not even' after
the Duchess of Argyll walked
up and gave it a slap.z
"'" ?, ' ? " Y :1'kq ?qfrr,. .i %rff {': .. .:.is r;?.,r,::,?

THE OLDEST PASSENGER
aboard the French jetliner, 82-
year-old Aureli Ouille, said she
been waiting for the trip for
years and was taking it "simply
for the pleasure of it."
"I hope that I will be able
to fly the Concorde to New York
when the Americans let it land
there," said Mrs. Ouille, who
comes from Toulouse, in South-
ern France, where the French
plane was built.
Both planes had full loads of
100 passengers, but the French
did much better financially.
Ninety-three of their passengers
were paying customers; only 28
aboard the British flight were
not traveling free.

BA HAMAS.
Dates of Trip: MARCH 6-13
Destination: FREEPORT BAHAMAS
Stay in the CASTAWAYS HOTEL
only
+ 10%°r + $3.00
Includes Air NON-STOP on Northwest Orient,
Hotel, Transfers, Baggage Handling, & Meals
in Flight.
LIMITED SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
$25.00 deposit reauired to hold reservation
CAMPUS INTERNATIONAL
Contact: Rosanne at 761-4965

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,
by leading 20th century artists:
Pablo Picasso Johnny Friedlaender Marc Chagall
Salvador Dali, Alexander Calder Joan Miro
Georges Rouault Victor Vasarely and others.
ALL NEW ART! 1ST SHOW OF SEASONI
THIS SUNDAY, Jan. 25th at 3:00 p.m.
MARRIOTT INN-BALLROOM
US 23 at Plymouth Rd.
EXHIBITION: 1:00-3:00. Mod, prices-Free admission
Presented by Meridion'Gallery Bank Chq. Cards acpt.

"I can't really afford it," he changes."
said. "But I talked it over with BULLAR
my wife and she agreed I must BULLo
go. mc n

FORDTEN CZ.
A FRIEND'S LUFE

I

S

VISCOUNT LEATHERS, the

House tor
votes to p
Bmillard

RT) CLAIMS the sup-
34 members of the~
3his bill. It needst56
pass.
strongly criticizes in-

'AT LONDON'S Heathrow Air-
ports, critics opposed to the
Concorde's noise and more than
$2.5 billion development cost
picketed with signs saying:
:vg ,n;sms ,v,.;.;r r;:r""a{::'rrr:?:iv: :r;;y;{x r:;r,{-

T 14) V yl\1 LL[1111L:1 , 41
'first to apply for the passenger
list more than 11 years ago,

t'
::
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i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
"°"kr:k?;.}y:: {":;rr~*,}"". .rilYr :r"::"t:4:}','"'r irr?"::" '"rii: ,"r:???Yr.}?r}?r } i:-:r:r{ i:"}h:"Y>Y i sism

l
t
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x
Y
t
t
I

referred jokingly to the 13-plus' Brushing a loaf of yeast
years it took Britain and France bread with slightly beaten egg1
to put Concorde into service. white before it goes in the oven
helps produce a crisp crust. Be-
"I wondered if I would de- cause you need only a small
part first or the aircraft would amount of egg white, you can'
depart first the 67-year-old pour the rest of it into a small
viscount said. .jar and put it in the freezer for
Bob Ingham, 50, an electrical use another time.
company manager from Wilt- -- -~
shire, wore a flowing silver j
dress edged with mauve and a' J
flame shaped hat with silver'j
fringes. His face was covered GJO rder
with silver makeup.

Thursday, January 22 pm; 802 Monroe.
Day Caendar ! Int'l Night: Czechoslavakian &
WUOM: "Dealing with Bureau- Yugoslavian menu, League Safeter-
:racies," incl. talk with James ; ia, 5-7:15 pm.
Borin, pres. of Intenat'i Assoc. of! University Club: Hockey Cmorgas-
Professional Bureaucrats, 10:10 am. i bord - Dan Rarrel, Glen Williams,
Ctr. Japanese Studies: Emiko Oh- Club Terrace, 6 pm.
nuki-Tierney, Beloit College, "The PTP: Goldsmith's She Stoops to
Ainu-Japanese Relationship," Com- Conquer, John Houseman's Acting
mons Rm., Lane Hall, noon. Co., 8 pm.
Public Health Films: Purposes of Music School: Wind Ensemble &
Pamily Planning; Sex Role Develop- I Symphony Band, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
ment; Vasectomy SPH II, 12:10 pm. 1 IPPS CEdward Gramlic, The Book-
Behavorial Science: Richard D., ings Inst., Cornell U., "An Econo-
Alexander, t'Evolution and Sosial mist's View of New York City's
Behavior," Lec. Rm. 1, MLB, 3:30- Fiscal Crisis," 102 Econ. Bldg., 8
5 pm. pm
Nuclear Seminar: B. H. Wilden- Chemistry: R. Kopelman, "Why
thal, MSU, "Survey of one- and Are Leaves Green: Excitons in Mo-
two-nucleon transfer reactions stu- lecular Aggregates," 1300 Chem, 8
died at the MSU cyclotron," P&Apm,
Dolloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Guild House: John Raines, Tem-
pie U., "Marxism and Radical Re-
ligion," 4-6 pm; poetry reading with
Steve Schwartz and Jim Paul, 7:30POETRY
r with STEVE
and J IA
The Feathered Serpent Reading from
IMPORTS & CRAFTS THURSDAY, JA
FROM THE AMERICAS at GUILD
309 E. Liberty
Ann Arbor, Michigon 48103 802
Telephone(313)995-42222

-.'-I..

BECAUSE YOU'VE
ACHIEVED
'SEl [tQ
C... , , -

U. ' '

The synchronized takeoff
scheduled for 12:40 p.m. 6:40
a.m. EST was arranged so that{
neither Air France nor British'
Airways would be first into com-
Imercial operation with the con-
troversial faster-than-sound jet-
liner the two countries devel-
oped jointly.
-Th

Subscription
Today
764-0558

READING
SCHWARTZ
A PAUL

Ihe experiences that have "carved" your real achievements
are the personal ones. Wear a class ring and remember.
Order on Ring Day and save 5%.
Thursday & Friday,Jan. 22 & 23
ULIUCH' S
549 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

n Their Works
N. 22-7:30
HOUSE-

III

I

P.M.

ON ROE

THURSDAY-January 22
12-1 p.m.--SCHOR LING A UD., School of Education N
"HIGHER EDUCATION and the AMERICAN DREAM:
The Equal Opportunity Myth"

A phone call. A simple,
ten-cent phone call for a cab
could save your friend's life.
If your friend has been
drinking too much, he shouldn't
be driving.
The automobile crash is
the number one cause of death
of people your age. And the
ironic thing is that the drunk
drivers responsible for killing
young people are most often
other young people.
Take a minute. Spend a
dime. Call a cab. That's all. If
you can't do that, drive him
yourself. Or let him sleep on
your couch.
We're not asking you to
be a doctor or a cop.Just a friend.
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYIAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.
I Mvname is

INTRODUCING,
Wine Connection

*

I

4-5 p.m.-GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe
"MARXISM and RADICAL RELIGION-Toward
a Revolutionary Humanism"

U

ii

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