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January 21, 1976 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-21

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Pope Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 21, 1976'I

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 21, 1976

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oil 1. 1 ,4qw

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House intelligence committee Council, Mayor
to disclose full CIA report may receive pay

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WASHINGTON M)-The House1 Congress," Pike told reporters. tions in advance, according to By RICK SOBLE

THURS. JAN. 29: "DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES"
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intelligence committee appear-
ed ready yesterday to disclose
details President Ford sought
to keep secret on U.S. intelli-
gence operations.
Under a compromise worked
out with the committee after an
earlier conflict, Ford moved
last week to block release of
separate reports on CIA aid for
Angola and Italian politicians.
BUT MEMBERS including
chairman Otis Pike (D-N.Y.)
contended yesterady the com-
promise can't keep the commit-
tee from disclosing that infor-
mation - and other secrets - in
its final report.
"I think there is no right of
the executive branch to censor
a report from a committee of

Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) pre-
dicted the committee might vote
as heavily as 9 to 4 that what-
ever agreement had been made
before cannot apply to the com-
mittee's final report to thej
House.
THE 340-PAGE report dis-
closes details not only on-the
Angola and Italian political
money operations but on several
others, including Navy subma-
rine spying on Soviet missile
firings.
It says among other things
that Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger did not notify the Na-
tional Security Council's 40
Committee of one operation un-
til a month after it began -
even though the 40 Committee
is supposed to approve opera-E

sources.
It also says U.S. intelligence
agencies spent $10 billion a year
abroad with inadequate super-
vision, according to sources.
IT CONCLUDES that U.S. aid
to Angola is far higher than the
$30 million figure used by the
Ford administration, because
weapons have been undervalued.
For example, it says, .45-cal-
iber pistols have been valued as
low as $5, and .30-caliber semi-
automatic carbines at-$7.55.
But a source with military
spending expertise said the re-
port fails to mention that some
of the weapons may be from
U.S. excess stocks-which would
make such prices about right.
The source said the real ques-
tion becomes whether the U.S.
weapons being supplied to An-
Golan fighting forces really are
from excess stocks as they are
claimed to be.
The Basketball Hall of Fame
was incorporated in 1959.

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Ann Arbor's Compensation
Committee last night recom-
mended that salaries for the
mayor and council members beG
incorporated into the city budgetc
beginning April 1. The mayor
would receive $10,000 and the
councilpersons $5,000 each.
The recommendation to pay
will become law after 30 days
unless eight council members
decide to vote it down.
THE RECOMMENDATION in-
cluded an observation that only
"wealthy people have been well
represented on counci,'' since
the job requires so much time
and effort and offers no pay.
Committee members hope that
low-income people will now have
incentive to run for Council.
Council has no option to amend
the recommendation of the
seven man Compensation Com-
mittee, which it established in
December.
AT THAT time Council was
ASP -FOR
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divided along partisan lines on
the issue of salaries, with the
minority Republicans refusing
to sunport a compensation com-
mittee.
F
"There has been direct evi-
dence that the citizens are not
willing to have their taxes di-
verted to pay for council sal-
Pries," said Roger Bertoia (R-
Third Ward),.
Bertoia was referring to a
popular vote taken four years
ago which defeated an amend-
ment to the city charter pro-
posing to pay council members.
HOWEVER, Democrats are
pleased with the recommenda-
tion, which they hope will allow
neonle with inflexible working
hours to hold council seats with
s-l4ries.
Edward Pierce, a Democrat
who served on council in 1964,
criticized the current reliance
of part-time councilpeople on
the city administrator for in-
?nrmation concerning legislation.
"I think if you're going to
r-present the people you have
to go out yourself and do some
snooping. That entails having the
time to devote, which i'n turn
entails being paid," he said.
PTERCE asserted that only the
wealthy could have enough time
to devote to non-paying council
duties.
Bertoia responded that "it has'
not been my experience that
people have been precluded by
time or responsibility from run-
ning for council or mayor."

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