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January 07, 1976 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1976-01-07

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Wednesday, January 7, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page beven

Wednesday, January 7, 1976 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page seven

Judge limits Nebraska trial
coverage; press balks at rules

NORTH PLATTE {A'-The judge presiding
over the mass murder trial of Erwin Charles
Simants yesterday imposed restrictions for press
coverage of jury selection proceedings. But the
restrictions prompted 10 reporters representing
nine news organizations to refuse to enter the
Lincoln County District Court to cover the trial.
District Court Judge Hugh Stuart met with
two groups of reporters yesterday morning be-
fore jury selection resumed. He explained re-
strictions he wanted imposed on trial coverage
following his reversal of an earlier order bar-
ring any coverage of jury selection proceedings.
AMONG THE conditions the judge wanted
the reporters to agree to were provisions that
jurors' names would not be reported before the
final panel of 12 jurors and two alternates is
sequestered. Stuart also wanted reporters to
agree not to report any expressions by pros-
pective jurors as to the guilt or innocence of
the defendant.k
Reporters representing The Associated Press,
the Omaha World Herald, The Washington Post,
the Lincoln Journal and Star, the North Platte
Telegraph, televisions stations KNOP of North
Platte and KETV of Omaha and radio station
KODY of North Platte, refused to go into court
because of the restrictions.
In his meeting with the second group of re-
porters, Stuart said he believed that the meet-
ing and the conditions constituted "an area that
you shouldn't put in the newspaper" because
it might set a precedent.
STUART HAD barred the media and the
public from jury selection proceedoings Monday
morning. When fears of possibly prejudicial
material coming out during the selection pro-
cess Monday failed to develop, the judge re-
versed himself Monday evening and agreed to
admit the press un'der certain voluntary re-
straints.
That action did not affect an earlier "gag"
order entered in the case. That earlier order,
as modified by the Nebraska Supreme Court,
is currently before the U.S. Supreme Court,
which is expected to act in late March or early
April.
Simants, 30, of Sutherland, is charged with
first degree murder in the Oct. 19 shooting
deaths of six members of the Henry Kellie
family. The Kellies lived next door to Simants.
THE CHARGES against Simants also accuse
him of sexual assault or attempted sexual as-
sault. Testimony in his preliminary hearing
indicated that the victim of the alleged sexual

assault was Florence Kellie, 10, one of three
children shot to death.
In the Tuesday morning meetings Stuart said,
"I'm not asking you for an agreement" to abide
by certain restrictions. However, when asked
if reporters could attend the jury selection if
they declined ot agree to the restrictions, Stuart
said, "I'm telling you that if you walk out of
here and tell me you're going to do exactly
what I asked you not to do, you're not going
to be admitted to the courtroom."
Three of the 10 reporters told Stuart that they
had problems accepting his restrictions, and the
judge ordered their names stricken from a list
of those who were to be admitted to the court
room.I
THE REMAINING seven reporters then de-
termined they, too, would remain out of the
courtroom rather than accept the restrictions.
Asked if the general public would have to
agree to any conditions before being admitted to
the courtroom, Stuart said they would not, add
ing, "I don't fear the public as I do you fellows."
Stuart said he did not want his restrictions
to set a precedent for other courts and said,
"I think is an area that you shouldn't put in
the newspapers. You're going to wind up with
closed courts and I think that's wrong. You
can't destroy fair trial with your right of a
free press."

Regents hear new
dorm lottery plan
(Continued from Page 1) "contemplates yielding some
thought to be a shoddy and ill- money for capital improve-
conceived system. ments, but the mammoth
EVEN FELDKAMP admits he amounts of money needed for
was not happy with last year's such a project is still not within
lottery, and there are indica- our grasp."
tions that he is under consider- THE BOARD was also pre-
able pressure tormake a better sented with the first compre-
Feldkamp thinks the opera-hensive overview of financial
tion will be smoother this yea aid funding at the University.
bti se will e oer xthios year Associate Vice President for
because of the new exceptions Academic Affairs Richard En-
and the elimination of the June hitoldthe Iegentsctatd$E3-
i deadline by which students million in grants and schol-
were able to cancel their leases.amil s in grt d sol-
Last yea",mnstdnssge arships were distributed to stu-
lases ya, many studn:s lognfordents on this campus last year,
leases and continued to look for in addition to $6.6 million in
off-campus housing, causing a
14 per cent cancellation rate loans and $16.9 million in em-
where an attrition of only six ployment opportunities. He said
per cent was expected. 58 per cent of the University's
students - about 19,000 - re-

FELDKAMP thinks students
are being given sufficient ad-
vance notice of the olttery and
says they were warned all last
term not to co'mt on dorm
space for next year. In addition,
200 additional spaces have since
been added by converting dou-
ble rooms to triples and reno-1
vating linen closets and staff

ceived some form of financial
assistance.
English's presentation yielded
some revealing figures on par-
ental income. Median parental
income at the University stands
at $20,300, with a third making
over $26,000, another third be-
tween $15 and $20,000, and the

ASKED IF HE believed
to extract agreements to
reporters while extracting
from the general public,
not trying to be fair to
We're trying to be fair to
A handful of spectators

it was discriminatory
the restrictions from
no such agreements
Stuart said: "We're
you newspapermen.
the defendant."
sat in the courtroom

Tuesday. There were no reporters present.
Jury selection is expected to conclude today.
In closing the jury selection Monday, StuartI
expressed the view that jury selection is not
a part of the trial itself but rather is a pretrial
proceeding.
News media attorneys contend that jury se-
lection is part of the trial and on Tuesday media
attorneys gave the judge two U.S. Supreme
Court decisions, one 8th Circuit Court of Ap-
peals decision and one Nebraska Supreme
Court decision which specifically state that jury
selection is a part of the trial.j
A coalition of Nebraska news organizations
which challenged the gag order imposed earlier
in the case ha sfiled notice of appeal of Mon-'
day's ruling closing jury selection to the media
and the public.

AP Photo
President Gerald Ford promised less government intervention in agriculture and said he
would "do everything in my power as President to keep farm income high" during an address
before the American Farm Bureau Federation Monday.
Pantel sets Angola hearinlgs

apartments for student use. final third falling under $15,Q00.
Feldkamp indicated that the I English said the racial and
plan is vulnerable in several ethnic breakdown of the in-
areas. One unanswered question comes, insofar as they could
involves the eight per cent af- determine, showed median in-
(irmative action clause. The re come of white families to be
port outlines no clear procedure $20,900, while median black
to be followed if the campus- family i e i ,6k
wide eight per cent goal is not
met. ENGLISH WAS reluctant to
Associate Housing Director draw any sweeping conclusions
John Finn says that in this about the report, calling it
event dorms will be considered merely "descriptive" and say-
on an individual basis to de- ing that more analysis was
termine how to increase minor- needed.
ity percentages.
Regent Sarah Power (D-Ann
AT THE board's next meet- Arbor) expressed concern that
ing, on Feb. 4, they are expect- the extremely decentralized na-
ed to consider a proposal by tre of the University's nearly
the Rate Study Committee for 3800 student aid accounts made
a room and board hike averag- the distribution of funds too
ing nine per cent. It is uncer- complicated. English called the
tam what effect this would system's complexity both "a
have on the lottery, and Feld-I major strength and a glaring
kamp says he would like to wait weakness," arguing that its far-
nntil after Regental action on flung character provided the
the measure before holding the'Snec~lex~rtr~o~d d
the easre bfor holingthekind of flexibility for student
drawing. needs that a monolithic student
Also among the committee's aid structure would not allow.
recommendations was a request
for Feldkamp's office to develop Vice President for Academic
a "realistic plan which will re- Affairs Frank Rhodes said
salt in the construction of addi- much of the student aid money
tional student housing." was in the form of gifts and
Feldkamp claims that he has grants earmarked for specific
examined the idea, but that "it purposes andnecessitating sep-
keeps fading every time." He arate accounts. Decentraliza-
says the possible rate hike tion, he said, "is a character of
money for capital impretaoin the system worth preserving."

Britain sends more troops
to Northern Ireland village

(Continued from Page 1)
a friend of one of his aides.
T1unney, who led the Senate ac-
tion against U.S. aid to the
anti-Soviet UNITA and FNLA
factions, speculated that the al-
leged flights may be a CIA oper-
ation.
* President Ford conferred
with Kissinger on the Angolan

(Ondau" iIom
testant workers.
EVEN BEFORE
spoke, the Belfast
the Provisional IRA
was ready to resum
operations with bomb
For 11 months a ce
been observed at lea
by both the IRAF
and British security
A weekend statem

PieSt : brigade claimed, "Britain's days land condemned this week's situation. Although no details of
in Ireland are numbered." The massacre and appealed to the the conference were revealed,
aim of the IRA is to unite north Catholic and Protestant extrem- White House Press Secretary
P a s 1 e y and south Ireland under Catho- ists to halt their reprisal kill- Ron Nessen said there was no
rd ic leadership. ings progress earlier this week in,
warned it As Catholic and Protestant: meetings between Kissinger and
e full-scale Senior officials insisted, how- families in the border counties Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Do-
bs and guns. ever, the Wilson government will fearfully await the next ven- brvnin.
ase-fire has not permit itself to be stain- geance outrage, politicians and Nessen also said he thought
ast partially peded by threats or warnings, public fear that unless the mur- Ford "was voicing a general:
Provisionals der campaign bq both sides is optimism and hope" when he
forces. CHURCH LEADERS and poli- halted the province could slide expressed the view Monday that
nent by the ticians throughout Northern Ire-°1 into civil war. the Soviets will not continue toI

send money and equipment to
the Soviet-backed faction in
Angola.
* The leader of a western-
backed UNITA faction in An-
gola urged the United States
Monday not to withdraw its aid
to anti-Soviet forces in the civil
war-torn African nation.
Jonas Savimbi expressed sur-
prise Monday at the recent U.S.
Senate vote cutting off military
aid to Angolan forces. He said
the U.S. and other Western
countries have "interests" in
the former Portuguese colony,I
adding:
"The leader of the Western
countries is the United States.
A big country cannot abdicate
from its responsibilities-it is
not possible." The U.S., he said,'

"whether it likes it or not, will
always be called upon to take
a stand."
0 In Moscow, the govern-
ment newspaper Izvestia ap-j
peared to hit back at recent,
statements on Angola by Ford
and Kissinger by saying thel
Soviet role there was in full!
accord with detente,.
An unusual front-page editor-
ial, which referred only to state-I
ments by "more responsible
Western figures," asked what
those who styled themselves
friends of the Angolan people
had done during Portugal's long
colonial war in Angola.
"Was it not with arms of
NATO, including A m e r i c a n
arms, that the Portuguese co-
lonial army was supplied?" Iz-
vestia asked.
TRAINING }
WORKSHOP
IN
Gestalt, "Hot Seat"
work, and Interpersonal
group process.
Wednesday Evenings
LEADERS: Michael Andes,
Richard Kempter
995-0088

k
t
i
{I{
S'
71
S
(
f

FRIDAY NIGHT at HILLEL
JANUARY 8th
5:00-MINYAN DAVENING
5:30-RAMAH DAVENING
6:00-REFORM SERVICE
7:00-COMMUNITY SHABBAT
DINNERa
8:30-ONEG SHABBAT
Speaker: PROF. YOCHANON PERES
"ISRAEL AND THE
OCCUPIED TERRITORIES"
-REFRESHMENTS-

Candidates file for City Council race

(Continued from Page 1) KATHY Kozenchenko (SHRP-
McGEE'S withdrawal from the Second Ward) is currently the
first ward race leaves only one only SHRP member holding a
Democrat, Ezra Rowry, to vie council seat and she has de-
for that open seat. Had McGee cided not to seek re-election
decided to stay in the race, a when her term expires in April.
primary would have been neces-
sary to choose the Democratic Howver, SH canddate
candidate. 1Diane Kohn, who hopes to fill
Rowry has been chairman of the seat that will be vacated
the Model Cities policy board for by Kozenchenko, is not pessi-
the past seven years. McGee mistic about the fate of the
describes him as a "competent" SHRP in the impending elec-
individual and throws him her tions.
Support. "It's much too early to make
The upcoming election looks predictions. There hasn't even
bleak for the local Socialist Hu- been any definition of the issues
man Rights Party (SHRP), yet," she said.
which has candidates running in'
only three of the five city KOHN HAS worked on the
wards. i SHRP City Committee for the

past two years and claims to be 1 of a laison between the admin- (SHRP). Second Ward-Earl W.
intimately acquainted with city istration and the students," he Greene (D), James A. Reynolds,
politics. said. ' Jr. (R) and Diane Lee Kohn
The Democrats and SHRP Elections in the third, fourth (SHRP). Third Ward-Martin
have had past success in the: and fifth wards involve incurn- L. Black (D) and Roger R. Ber-
second ward, where student lib- bents Bertoia, Kenworthy and toia (R). Fourth Ward-James
erals comprise a significant per- Belcher,srespectively. Kenworthy (D) Mary Lou Slater
Jeame Renolsi h didsfBth, rently shapes up: First Ward- (R) and Madelyn Elder (SHRP).
James Reynolds, is himself both Ezra L. Rowry (D), Wendell Fifth Ward-Judith M. Hanks
a liberal and a student. Allen (R) and R. Thomas Owen (D) and Louis D. Belcher (R).
In fact, Reynolds says heis
running more as an independent
than as a Republican.j It Pto
"I'M NOT A card carrying
Republican, I'm just running on -r-I kA I
the Republican ticket. Right now in T he M ichigan D aily
I'm Director of Student Organ-
izations at the University, ,sort

Please
Friday

make reservations for Dinner
- CALL 663-3336.

by 1 p.m.

NOWASW

a lovi n'
IassfuI

REGISTER NOW FOR COURSES

I
'
L__ _.
.-, ,c U
P ,,,,
f h Y
S-.. , ___._._._,,,, O
_
}
} . ,
,

SUBJECT
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTO/INTRO.
PHOTO I
PHOTO 11
DARKROOM I
DARKROOM I
DARKROOM 11
DARKROOM III
COLOR PRINT.
LIGHTING
PORTRAITURE
FIGURE PHOTO.
STUDIO TECH.
MODELING
ART
LIFE DRAWING
LIFE. ADV. '
LIFE, PRACTICE
CALLIGRAPHY
ACRYLICS/OILS
WATERCOLORS
SILKSCREEN
GRAPHICS & PRINTING
POTTERY, HAND
POTTERY, WHEEL
GLASSBLOWING
GLASS. FIRED
WEAVING

STARTING

FEE

JAN. 12/7:30P
JAN. 19/6:00 P
JAN. 19/8:00 P
JAN. 13/7:00 P
JAN. 15/7:00 P
JAN. 14/7:00 P
JAN. 17/7:00 P
JAN. 12/7:00 P
JAN. 21/7:00 P
JAN. 17/10:00 P
FEB. 3/12:30 N
JAN. 13/12:30 N
JAN: 17/7:30 P

FREE
$24
24
25
25
25
25
36
12
24
32
24
36
28
28,
10
22
24
24
24
30
35
$37
30
30
22

SUBJECT
PHYSICAL ARTS
HATHA YOGA
HATHA YOGA
YOGA-LUNCH
TAI CHI I
TAI CHI I
TAI CHI 11
TAI CHI III
KUNG FU
SELF-DEFENSE, WOMEN'S

STARTING

JAN. 13/8:30 P
JAN. 12/6:00 P
JAN. 15/8:30 P
JAN. 15/6:15 P
JAN. 12/8:30 P
JAN. 13/6:00 P
JAN. 20/7:00 P
JAN. 30/7:30 P
JAN. 14/6:30 P
CONTINUOUS
JAN. 13/6:00 P
JAN. 17/1:00 P
JAN. 15/6:00 P

DANCE
BALLET, BEG.
BALLET. ADV.
MODERN
MODERN
IMPROMPTU
CREATIVE
DANCE/YOGA
TAP DANCE
TAP. CONT.
JAZZ, AFRICAN
JAZZ, MOVEMENT
JAZZ, CONT.
AFRICAN DANCE
BELEDI I
BELEDI I
BELEDI II
3ELEDI II I
I'cLEDI IV
BALLROOM

JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.
JAN.

12/5:45 P
14/5:45 P
15/12:10 N
13/6:00 P
13/7:30 P
13/9:00 P
15/7:40 P
14/8:30 P
15/6:00 P

13/6:15 P 24
15/5:45 P 24
14/5:45 P 24
14/8:15 P 24
14/7:00 P 24
13/5:45 P 24
15/4:30 P 24
17/9:15 A 24
17/11:45 A 24
15/8:30 P 24
17/10:30 A 24
17/11:45 A 24
12/6:00 P 24
12/7:30 P 30
13/7:30 P 30
12/9:00 P 30
15/7-.00 P 30
13/9:00 P 30
12/8:30P 20/Ind. 32/co,

FEE
22
22
18
24
"24
24
24
30
20

I BETH FITTS' DANCE STUDIO

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