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January 20, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-20

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Tuesday, January 20, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Astrologers see

By MIKE NORTON
Nine Michigan astrologers
gathered in Ann Arbor last
weekend to discuss the future,
and what they decided, didn't
look promising. They all agreed
the world was headed for a
period of violent change and
turmoil which would reach its
peak in the 1980's.
The meeting took place in the
Ann Arbor Yoga Center at Mil-
ler and Spring as part of aI
week-long program of self-reali-
zation.
"1980 IS THE YEAR," said
Aceka, a self-proclaimed wan-

dering astrologer, who is cur-
rently wintering in Ann Arbor.
"That's when the shit's going
to hit the fan. If anything is ever
going to happen, it'll happen be-
tween then and '89."
Western materialism and a
growing tendency for people to
look only at short-range goals
were the reasons given by Ralph
Davis of Ann Arbor. It's all
leading us into a sort of cres-
cendo of darkness," he said.
"The whole question is: will
we be bowled over by all this
pand and confusion, or can we
learn from it? It's up to each
person to get his act together,

violent future
to develop enough strength to voters made their choice of can-
maintain his integrity as a hu- didate during the election they
man being." should go on the vibes they got
ACKIE KIMLER of Deti from the candidate. "Don't wor-
saw "malefic" influences at ry about their voting records,"
s around Gerald Ford, and she said. "That kind of think
workarond erad Frdandcan always be misleading."
suggested everyone project feel-
ings of goodwill and health to- COAL RESEARCH
ward him. A member of the
audience objected, saying he UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -
was interested in Ford getting (UP I) - Research personnel
his shot together but not in im- from the Pennsylvania State
proving his health. University will soon begin col-
"The two things are the same," lecting samples of coal from
said Aceka. "What goes on in deep and strip mines in three
the President goes on in the states to determine the appro-
country. Look at all the trouble priateness of certain coals for
Nixon had with his body, and liquefication and gasification.
then at all the things that went The researchers hope to ob-
down when he was in office. tain 1,300 samples of coal to de-
Everybody was thinking bad termine if it can be turned into
thoughts about him, and it was clean fuel. They also will deter-
all bouncing back at us." mine the potential of various
"When we hate our leaders, voals for use in furnaces now
we're only hurting ourselves," burning oil.
added Steve Levine of Detroit. The researchers plan to visit
"We're all linked." mines in Virginia, Eastern Ken-

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>
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Youths contribute
to rising crime rate

Puppy love?,
the elephant, gives her goat chum, "88," an elephant-size hug. "88" is one of a pair ofg
at the Baltimore Zoo. Officials claims that the animals keep each other company.

Tambu
Tambu

BUFFALO (AP) - Gun-totingc
teen-agers are contributing to a
tripling of holdups in the Buffalot
area, the FBI says, and a city1
judge contends economic con-
ditions may be partly to blame.
"It seems to be peculiar tos
Buffalo," said Dennis Gibbs, a1
bank robbery supervisor at the
* . Buffalo office of the FBI. "We
have them as low as 14-years-old
here. They all seem to carry
guns. .
BANK ROBBERIES in the 17-
are up nearly 300 per cent,
AP Photo Gibbs said, Fifty bank robber-
AP Poto des were reported between JulyI
and December of last year, he
said, compared with 13 in thet
same period a year ago.
swith And while exact figures onc
the number of -teen-age banditst
--aren't available, authorities say
half or more of the hold-ups!
may have been committed by
r l d! 2persons under the age of 20.
"What ever Dossessed you to
bib ank" Lt. Raymond
Fries, head of Buffalo's police1
rohherv scuad, asked a 17-year-
eC ourt 1 l set
THE SUSPECT shrugged his.
"Did you think it would make
allow children time off during you a bi- man in the r eighbor-
the school day to attend i'elig- hood?" "Yeah, I guessso."
ious classes away from the "ml)DT YOU need the money?"
school grounds. "Well, yeah, I guess so. I
was thinking about getting a
car,,
-DECLINED TO reconsider ca."
Buffalo City Judge Samuel
its November decision uphold- Green says several reasons, in-
ing a desegregation order which rleding economic conditions in
could require busing between Buffalo's black neighborhoods,
the predominantly black city could be behind the surge in
schools and predominantly te'n-nee bank robberies.
white suburban schools of Wil- THE BLACK unemployment
mington, Del. kiv"re is thought to be at leastj

ords, edited to protect those in-
volved, provide graphic detail
to the evolution of a 15-year-old
bank robber:
"I was hanging around when
Tony Smith came up to me and
said I owed him $100 for some
bet. I didn't remember the bet,
and I told Tony that I didn't
have any money.
"TONY TOLD ME not to wor-
ry about it. We were going to
hit a bank. He told me to meet
him at Pete's house at two that
afternoon.
"I met him and Pete and a
14- or 15-year-old kid I didn't
know. Tony had his nephew's
car, and the four of uspdrove
down gJefferson Avenue.
"Tony handed me a sawed-
off shotgun and he said me and
the other kid - Joe, I think was
his name - that we were to
go into the bank and yell,
'Everybody hit the floor! This is
a holdup!'
"ME AND JOE" went into the
bank and yelled what we were
told. I held the gun . and Joe
jumped over the tellers' cages
and scooped up all the money
he could find and put it in a
pink pillow case "Tony gave
him.
"We ran out of there and
jumped into Tony's car, and we
raced like hell back to Pete's
house in the project.
'We were dividing the money
up when the cops came in."
'CANALPHONE'{
LONDON (UPI) - In caseI

Kimler suggested that when tucky and Tennessee.
LS&A Scholarship Applications
LS&A Scholarship applications for Spring,
Summer, Fall 1976, and Winter 1977 will be
available in 1220 ANGELL HALL beginning
January 21, 1976. To qualify for scholarship
consideration, a htudent must be an LS&A
undergraduate and have attended the Univer-
sity of Michigan for at least one full term.
Student must have a U of M grade point over-
age of 3.2 or better.
The awards are based on financial need and on aca-
demic merit. Completed applications must be returned
to 1220 Anqell Hall by February 13.

Winner-take-all primary
constitutional by Supren

WASHINGTON VP) - In a not for California.

case which could have majorj
impact on the battle for the
1976 Republican presidential,
nomination, the Supreme Court
yesterday affirmed the consti-
tutionality of California's win-
ner-take-all primary for GOP
candidates.I
The court, with explanation,j
upheld a decision of a three-
judge federal court upholding
the primary and leaving it in ef-
feet for selection of the state's
167 delegates to next year's;
GOP convention.
CALIFORNIA DEM-
OCRATS have abandoned the
winner-take-all system in favor,
of a plan of election, by con-.
gressional districts and by cau-
cuses of elected delegates.

He argued that the system
unconstitutionally dilutes the
voting strength of political ele-
ments in the state.
IN SUPPORT OF his argu-
ment, he noted that Vice Presi-
dent Nelson Rockefeller carried
4 of the state's 58 counties in
1964, but Sen. Barry Goldwater
of Arizona won all of the GOP
delegates.
Similarly in 1972, Sen. George
McGovern of South Dakota re-
ceived all of the Democratic
delegates although he won on-
Iv 43.5 per cent of the popular
vote. Sen. Hubert Humphrey of
Minnesota led in the voting in
eight counties including popu-
lons Los Angeles and Orange
counties.
"Not only would the outcome
of the delegate elections in
C nlifnrnia have been different.

party nominations might wellc
have been different" if dele-t
gates had been elected by dis-i
tricts, Graham argued.
Graham's suit was the sec-
ond time California's winner-
take-all system has been chal-
lenged in the Supreme Court.
IN OTHER ACTIONS, the'
court:
--Refused to review the con-;
victian of the Wilmington Ten,
nine black men and a white
woman who were charged in
connection with a fire at a small;
white - owned grocery store inI
a black neighborhood of Wilm-
ington, N. C. during racial dis-
t'irhances there in February
19"1, their prison sentences
ranged from a ten-year maxi-;
mum for Mrs. Ann Shenard to
31 vears for two of the vouths.
-Refused to reconsider its
24-near-old riding that nuhlic

I
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SUPPORTER S O F
Sen. Hubert Humphrey, a 1972
candidate for the Democratic
presidential nomination, filed
suit to block Sen. George Mc-
Govern from claiming all the
California delegates after win-
ning the state primary. That I
suit was based, not on consti-
tutinnal grounds, but on a con- I
tention that recent Democratic
reforms should apply to thel

The California presidential. 1.." 1t'W[i~ IRVC- M= 1. U11.IC.t ...~a-luit~it t..~i~w
primary will be held June 8. A the outcome of the rspective schools constitutionally may 1972 deleg- te selection process..
victory by former California .::::...... ..::...........::... .:.;..:...... :....... :... _:..................; :; :;::"<>:::;::>;fi t
Gov. Ronald Reagan, who has t
previously won the primary as
a favorite son candidate, could 1 L T
give him a big boost in h eAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
frt t residet F nomination
Tuesday, January 20 discussion." Back to School and camp: interview Tues. Jan. 27, 9-5:
Besides Caifornia, only Ore-,Day Calendar Back to Work," F. Conf. Rm., Rack- openings incl. counselors, specialists,
yWUOMv: Robert Murphy, Columbia ham 8 p~m. nurse: regist"^r by phone or in per-
gon, Rhode Island and the Dis- University, "Reviso i Group on Latin American Issues: sons Camp Sea Gull, Mich., Coed;
Mexico: The Frozen Revolution; Don interview Wed. Jan. 28, 9-3; open-
tric ofColubiaselet teir t. PCsinse Suie s '' ich0ard. Ed- Pedro: La Vida de tun Pueblo, Res. inks include waterfront, arts, crafts,
convention delegates by the win- Ctr. Chinese is Ed Aud. 8 p.m. riding, photography, gymnastics;
ner-take-all method. Under such wards. "A Preview of Wen Chen- Summer Placement register by phone or in person.
cnitewnr ing," Commons Rm., Lane Hall SA 6341 Camp Echo Lake, New York Coed:
a rule, the candidate who re- on m 3200 SAB, 763-4117 J ed, an. 28, 9-5; open-
ceives the most votes gets all CEW: Susan Golden, "Preschool Historic Deerfield now accepting ings include counselors, specialists,
the delegates. Families and Work," 328 Thompson, applications for its 1976 Summer waterfront; register by phone- or in
noon. Fellowship Program for jrs & srs; person, 763-4117.
Music School: 'Wind dept. student stipend provided; applications due
THE SYSTEM WAS challeng. recital, Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m. Feb, 1; applications available, DOB,
ed by James Graham a Bel Evaluation Seminar Series: Rich- CP&P. New York City Urban Fellow- W H Y W ALK
mont, Calif., attorney who is a tion: Legal Drinking Age and High- cations; jrs, srs & grads encouraged
registered Republican. way Safety." E. Conf. Rm., Rack- to apply; application deadline, Feb. } E
ham. 3 p.m. 15; more info in DOB; write for
Biophysics: C. M Venkatachalam, applications; NYC residents only. AvailC
He said the plan might be "Theoretical Aspects of Protein Commonwealth of virginia now ac-
all right for Oregon, Rhode Is- =Folding," 618 P&A Bldg., 3 p.m. cepting applications for its Admin- W 11's Va
l Low"Energy Seminar: Steven Case, istrative Intern Program; srs &
land and the District Of COlrIM- "Holography: Gratins and Devices," grads encouraged to apply; for more FEATURING:
bia, which are smaller and not (with demonstrations) 2038 Randall info & application forms see DOB Denim Bells Prnet
as adverse in population, but Lab,.erimental Biology; Michigan 12. AFL-CIO accepting applicat Brush Denims Knit
pl o B t
Women in Science: Mary Beth Burn- for its Labor Research Internship * Corduros
side, U. of Penn., "The Roles of Program for year beginning July 1,
TI MICHIGAN DAIIN Microtubules and Actemyosin Sys- '76; open to grads; salary provided;
Volume LXXXVI, No. 94 tems in Cell Shape Change in Tele- for more info & application forms W ild's Va
Tuesday, January 20 1976 ;zst Photoreceptors," Lec. Rm. 1, consult DOB at CP&P; applications
Is edited and managed by students MLP, 4 p.m. due March 15. Disneyland/Walt Dis- 311 S. STA
at the University of Michigan. News Women of the University Faculty: ney World accepting applications
phone 764-0562. Second class post ae Thomas Gies, "Inflation of 1976: for summer Work Experience Pro-
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 How to Succeed Without Really Try- gram in Entertainment; for more
Published d a l l y Tuesday through ing," Assembly HaL, Rackham, 7:30 info & application forms see DOB
Sunday morning during the Univer- p.ml. at CP&P; applications due Feb. 29.
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Michigan Women in Science: Panel Camp Courage, Iowa: Handicapped T CKETS NC
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription.--..-.--..---.-. ---
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
t i X1 b mail outside Ann A-

twice as high as official state
labor fienres showing 12.8 per!
cent joblessness in Buffalo.
And, say Green, the black
P-nloitation -.movie that glamor-
izes pimps and hoods has be-
come very popular the last few
ye-rs.
"And the kids identify with
these characters and their flas-
hv cars and clothes. The mate-,
rial thinks become very import-
ant to them. And they know their
parents can't afford to buy them
the clothes and cars they want.
"SO THEY FEEL denied, and
some of them just go out and
take it. They rob banks."
Erie County Family Court rec-
RICE EXPORTS
BUCARAMANGA,Colombia-
(UPI) - Colombia is exporting
155,000 tons of rice a month to
54 countries in the world and
plans to expand its rice acreage
in the Eastern Plains to meet
ever greater demand, Joaquin
Gonzalez, assistant manager of
the National Federation of Rice
Growers, said at a seminar
here.
FARTHER !
'BRAND

you get stuck next year on a
British canal, pickup a tele-
phone.
The British Waterways Board
has inaugurated "Canalphone,"
a i 24-hour-a-day information
service to provide details of
events on Britain's inland
waterway system and to warn
of maintenance work, tunnel
closures or canal - blocking ac-
cidents.
INTRODUCTION TO
KUNDALINI YOGA
as taught by
Swami Rudrananda
and
Mcael Shoemaker

GROWTH GROUPS for
Undergraduate MEN and WOMEN
- on
HUMAN SEXUALITY
NOW FORMING
*8 weekly sessions MON. or TUES. evenings.
0 Limited to 5 men, 5 women per group.
" DESIGNED to explore RELATIONSHIPS,
SEXUAL PREFERENCE, MALE AND
FEMALE IDEAS OF SELFHOOD.
* FOCUSED more on feelings, values, beliefs,,
attitudes, experiences, than on information.
-Singles or couples are welcome--
--Includes an all-day workshop
CALL
Bob Lindsey (764-7442)
THIS WEEK for more information or for
reservations. First come, first served.
FREE OF CHARGE
Our third year offering these groups
A program of Ethics and Religion, Student Services
Third Floor, Michigan Union
764-7442

Beainers' Classes Every
MWF at 5:30 p.m.
RUDRANANDA ASHRAM
640 Oxford, 995-5483

r

7

IN 1972, 16,000 U-M students called for the creation of a unique organization in Michigan.
It would be funded by students, controlled by students and it would attack problems that
students thought were important. It would be called Public Interest Research Group in
Michigan, or

P IRGIM

I

able at
rsity

Shop

ella 0 Work Shirts
Slaks * Flannel Shirts
Jeans
Nash Slaks 0 Denim Jackets
rsity Shop
TE STREET

So for PIRGIM'S -full-time, professional staff has investigated emergency medical care, ex-
cessive Pentagon spending, the transportation of radioactive wastes, unnecessary govern-
mental secrecy, the rental housing market, the high price of food, and a lot more, all IN
THE STUDENT INTEREST.
Students can take part in PIRGIM'S work: Students can become a PIRGIM member and help
fund its activities by paying the $1.50 PIRGIM fee on their tuition bill. Anyone can also
work with PIRGIM'S students and professionals- as a researcher, an investigator, an office
worker or as an organizer, all IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST.
CONTACT PIRGIM AT 4106 MICHIGAN UNION, 662-6597
If students choose not to support PIRGIM, they can obtain a PIRGIM FEE "REFUND."
PLEASE SEE OUR OTHER AD

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e

)W ON SALE
$4.00

I

borF
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in A -n
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Linn
Arbor.
$ 'gf,95
PER DAY j
FLAT .RATEs
NO Mileage
$89.50 Weekly

1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

..

WHERE THE ACTION IS!!

EVER
Breakfast All Day Beef St
Chines
3 Eacis, Hash Browns, Eaqi Rol
Toast &sJelly-$1.25 Home-
Berle
Ham or Bacon or Sausage Horne-n
wth 3 EqqsHash Browns, Veaeto
Toast & Jelly-$l.85 (ser'
3 Eaqs, Pibe Eye Steak,
Hash Browns, Toast & spolle
Jely--$2.25BefC
1,4 lb. R

YDAY SPECIALS
roqanoff
,Pepper Steak
Als
made Soups, Beef,
ev, Clam Chowder, etc.
-made Chili
ble TCmpuro
rvd after 2 p.m.
urge-r Steak Dinner-
lb. $2.25
Ati in Wine Sauce
:rry Rice
Flounder Dinner
Roost Beef Kaiser Roll

at.
Hill Auditorium
Box Office
The Blind Pig
and both Discount
Record stores
Les McCann
AND

Enjoy:

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
* DANCING HIGH ABOVE THE CITY
* COCKTAILS
* PANORAMIC VIEW OF U OF M CAMPUS
CASUAL DINING
--all at moderate prices
-no cover charge

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-AT THE ALL NEW-

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