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September 06, 1975 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-06

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Saturday, September 6, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Saturday, September 6, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Dorm rooms still available;
many lottery losers return

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By CATHERINE REUTTERI
Last year at this time, close
to 50 male freshpersons had to
be temporarily housed in the
Bell Tower hotel, waiting for
spaces to open in the dorms.
Today, "Fifty people could
walk in and we could give them
rooms," says John Finn, hous-
ing information director.
FINN EXPLAINS that, "We
have spaces in all the residence'
halls s in c e people haven't
shown up. We had more people
reapply and then cancel than
ever before." Last year the no-
show rate was 2.5 per cent, this
year it has jumped to 14, and{
it may rise even more.
7,000 mo
miners jot
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) -
More coal miners were idled
yesterday as the 26-day-old wild-
cat strike continued to spread
amid reports of violence and
union t h r e a t s to reprimand
strikers.
About 37,000 of West Virginia's
50,000 miners remained idle yes-

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,
,
'
,

Finn emphasizes that it was
necessary to conduct last year's
unpopular lottery so that all in-
coming freshpersons could be
guaranteed spaces. In addition
to the surprising rise in no-
shows, there were less fresh-
people than Housing expected.
Last year, the lottery guaran-
teed 4,247 spaces for new stu-
dents. "We did not meet that
quota," says Finn.
"I have been able to accom-
modate everybody that told me
they wanted a space," Finn in-
sists. He believes that people
now living in apartments might
have been accommodated if the
students had been able to wait
long enough.
re coal
I
.n strike
terday, an increase of 7,000
s i n c e Wednesday, industry
sources said. Mines in the
state's northern panhandle were
the only ones working, they
said.
IN ADDITION, the strike ap-
parently spread back into Penn-j
sylvania, idling at least 900
miners in the extreme south-
western corner of the state.
Last week, more than 10,000
Pennsylvania miners were out
at the peak of the miners' re-
bellion.
Some mines also were closed
in extreme eastern Kentucky,
but without picketing or vio-
lence, an industry spokesman

BEFORE BLAME could be
laid on the University for poor
planning, Finn pointed out that
219 spaces had been created by
converting rooms to triples.
"We may not have had to
convert those rooms after all.
Before the year is over, I'm
sure we'll be able to deconvert
all of them, but maybe not un-
til January," Finn said. The
crowded new triples will con-
vert to doubles as space allows.
Next year's situation may not
improve substantially. S o m e
dorm residents may be forced
away again. The Housing Office
blames the increasing reappli-
cation rate, and returning stu-
dents blame the increasing
costs of living and renting in
Ann Arbor.
"There's.got to be some type
of selection," Finn says regret-
fully, "but I don't know if the
lottery will be as it was this
year."
The silver lining in the other-
wise cloudy picture? The only
three males who had to be tem-
porarily housed stayed at BaitsI
because of special problems un-
related to overcrowding.

Ch wch W.4hipI epice4
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY CHURCH
THE NAZARENE , CHAPEL (LCMS) OF CHRIST
409 N. Division ' 1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560 Presently Meeting at
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
Church School-9:45 a.m. Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m. David Graf, Minister
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m. -Worship Services. Students Welcome.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m. Sunday at 9:15 a.m. -Bible Fur Wlom es
* * jSuyGop For information or transpor-
*IRT*T StudyGroup.tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. - 10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
CHURCH Midweek Informal Worship. Service.
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services: r FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, BETHLEHEM UNITED
8:30 a.m.--Communion Serv- IENITCUC FCRS
ice-Chapel.3 SCIENTIST CHURCH OF CHRIST
9:30 a.m.-In the Sanctuary. 1833 Washtenaw 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 66S-6149
11:00 a.m.-In the Sanctuary. Sunday Service and Sunday Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
Sermon: "The L o v e Which School-10:30 a.m.
Overcomes" by Rev. Kenneth Wednesday Testimony Meet- 9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
R. Colton. ing-8:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
Worship service is broadcast Child Care-Sunday, under 2 10:00 a.m.-Church School.
over WNRS-AM (1290) each years; Wednesday, through 6 Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
Sunday from 11:00 to 12:00 noon. years. ice.I
*"* * Reading Room - 306 E. Lib- Service broadcast on WNRSj
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.; (1290 AM)

Decorate with the sophi:ticated artistry of tribal cultures
* TEXTILE ART from three continents.
* ORIGINAL JEWELRY DESIGNS in imported
beads & silver.
baobab,
FOLK ART GALLERY
123 W. WASHINGTON 662-3681
I OUSB
218 N. DIVISION 665-0606
THE HOUSE IS OPEN
The bia. blue house on the corner of Catherine & Division
is open to you and evervone from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.,
Tuesdavs throuqh Sundovs. Some folks find it a qood place
to read the paper, study, come by with a friend for coffee,
or make friends with someone at the House.
If you want some help with a orobleri, or simply want to
talk with someone, there are people around who are easy
to talk to, includiriq the two chaplains. If we can't help,
we miaht know someone who can.
Pot-luck picnics on Fridays around 6:00 p.m.
Feast of Thanksqivina on Sundays at Noon.
CHAPLAINS: The Rev. Andrew Foster
The Rev. Bruce Campbell

Sudanese
put down
attempted
take-over
KHARTOUM, Sudan () -
Forces loyal to President Jaafar
el-Numairi crushed a rebellion
yesterday led by an obscure
army officer who was wounded
and arrested after a tank-led
assault on the state radio sta-
tion, authorities said.
How many died in nearly two
hours of fighting that swirled
around the station, the army
headquarters and the presiden-
tial palace was not immediately
known.
IN A BROADCAST after the
battle, Numairi said the situa-
tion was under control. He
urged the Sudanese to turn over
to police any plotters who fled,
into the countryside after the
coup failed.
He described the attempt to
topple him as a "trivial act by
officers who couldn't even con-
trol a village," and said it was
aimed at halting development
in Africa's largest nation.
He said the plotters were in
the pay of a foreign agent but
did not elaborate and said he
would give more details on the
coup attempt in a speech on,
Monday.
THE LEADER of the coup,
identified as Major Hassan Hus-
sien Osman,.was at first report-;
ed by Sudanese Vice President
Mohammed Baghier Ahmed as!
"silenced forever," which was
taken to mean he was executed.
But later the Sudanese news '
agency corrected the vice pres-
ident's statement and reported
Osman "was wounded and is re-
ceiving treatment at the mili-
tary hospital in Omdurman."
Numairi, who himself came
to power in a coup in May 1969,
has provided Sudan's most sta-
ble political period since inde-
pendence from Britain 20 years
ago. In July 1971 he beat down
an attempt by leftist army of-
ficers to drive him from power.
T' rates
poorlyin
brew- ff
Ann Arbor may be the dope
capital of the midwest, but
when it comes to chugging Mil-
waukee's finest we rate a me-
diocre number 30 in the nation.
That's where the local beer
drinkers placed in a contest
sponsored by Miller Brewing
Co. to collect the aluminum
cans from their Miller and Lite
beer for recycling.
The contest, which student or-
ganizations on 77 campuses na-
tionwide entered, was won local-
ly by the guzzlers at Theta Del-
ta Chi fraternity who collected
approximately 480 pounds of the
cans and received a "Minnesota
Fats" pool table yesterday
(complete with "automatic ball
return and a full selection of
cues - the ultimate in pocket
billiard tables," according to:

Order
Your

CHURCH (ALC-LCA)4
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Gordon Ward, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
MinistersI
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCHf
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west ofa
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
Sa.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.

* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
and Sermon.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
* * * -
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).

there's
Classified

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at Pikeville said.
United Mine Workers Presi-
dent Arnold Miller and UMW
Secretary-Treasurer Harry Pat-
rick flew into Charleston to
meet with local union officials
in sotuhern West Virginia, the
heart of the strike area.
THEY MET in a stormy two-
hour session yesterday with 250
union local presidents and told
them that coal miners who re-
fuse to work should be repri-
manded. The reprimands could
be accompanied by fines.
In a voice vote, the group
disassociated itself with right-
to-strike activists who have
sent roving pickets throughout
southern West Virginia in re-'
cent weeks. At the same time,
the groun urged the interna-
tional union to make every ef-
fort to halt coal company use
of court injunctions as a tool
to end local grievances.
Patrick told the group he
wanted the men to report for
work. "If pickets show up, you
know what to do," he said.
"You've been doing it for four
weeks. But I want you to report
to work and keep reporting
every shift. They can't be
everywhere all the time and I
pretty soon they'll run out of
gas."-
SPOKESPERSONS for struck
companies in Pennsylvania said
there were no local disputes and
that they assumed the strikes
were related to the continuing!
walkout in West Virginia.
Te Dee A. Theofil!
studio
school of dance
ballet
tap
jazz
995-1747 modern
220 so. main st.
ann arbor, mich.
'E

I

II

BRUCE
SPRINGS1EEN
TUES., Sept. 23, 8 p.m., POWER CENTER
Reserved Seats $5.00
Tickets go on sale Fri., Sept. 12

CHICK COREA
F R I., Sept. 26, 8 p.m., H ILL AU D,
Reserved Seats $5.00, $4.50, $3.50
Tickets go on sale Tues., Sept. 16
THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNING
of the UAC Concert Co-op Fall '75 semester
COMPLETE SCHEDULE WILL BE OUT SEPT. 17
WATCH FOR IT AND PICK ONE UP
Tickets available at UAC box office in lobby of
Mich. Union. Mon. thrugh Fri. 10:30-5:30.
Box Office opens Sept. 12, 763-2701. Sorry,
we cannot accept personal checks.
SMOKING & BEVERAGES STRICTLY PROHIBITED

WHERE CAN I GET

In Rochester, NewYork, it's been happening foryears.
The youth is a member of TOPs. Teens on Patrol.
A group of boys and girls from the inner city who
work with police each summer to help keep city rec-
reation areas safe and orderly.
TOPs was conceived by Eastman Kodak Com-
pany and Rochester Jobs, Inc. in 1967. It has brought
about a areater understanding and mutual respect

pants, not observers. When they get to know the
people they're sworn to protect, they learn how their
interests can be better served.
Why does Kodak provide financial support to
TOPs? Because helping the people of Rochester
communicate withhoneanother helps build a better
community in which the company can operate and
grow. In short, it's good business. And we're in busi-

HEALTH INSURANCE?
From St tj.re nt rnment C raril nrA f ror KoorMicinn

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