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September 05, 1975 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-05

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Friday, September 5, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seventeen

- iPOLICE CRACK DOWN

Hash trade booms in Austria

By DAVID STOREY
VIENNA (Reuter) - Austria,
poking like a long thumb into
Communist Eastern Europe,
has long been a convenient'
base for spies, smugglers and
gun - runners plying their risky
trade between East and West.
But in the last few years, Aus-
trian authorities have had a
new illicit traffic to contend
with - hashish smuggling.
A U S T R I A LIES directly
in the path between the hash-
ish - producing lands of the
Middle East and the pot parties
of Northern Europe.
Police haveknown for a
long time that the route be-

with the International Police'
Organization, INTERPOL.
THE MAIN target was to
plug the Austrian connection in
the hashish trail. The bureau
has also had minor successes
with hard drug smugglers. But
the heroin handlers rarely touch
Austrian soil except exclusive-
ly in transit at Vienna's Schwe-
chat Airport.
The initial effect of the de-
partment rocked the hashish
dealers back on their heels and
forced them to rethink their en-
tireoperations.
Whereas in 1971 less than 220
pounds of hashishwere con-
fiscated, in the year the de-

hind him, seems to enjoy thor- hicle brings the goods in, an-
oughly his cat-and-mouse game other takes them to a storage
with the drug smugglers, depot and another delivers
across the border into West
He was chasing the small-acostebrrinoWt
time dealers in Vienna for sev- Germany, according to the in-
en years before the national vestigators.
squad was set up. He delights Dr. Hoffman's department,
in the growing success of his which numbers 60 men spread
young department, which forc- throughout the country's nine
ed the hashish transporters to provinces, was temporarily
change their methods as soon fooled by the more complex
as it was established- method and the police catches
as itdecreased in 1973. Since then'
UNTIL THEN one vehicle its grip has tightened, again.
and one driver were used to More than 3,300 pounds of
bring the drugs into, across and hashish have already been
out of the country. Dr. Hoff- seized in a series of highly pub-
man's squad introduced rigor- licized cases during the first
ous border checks on cars and three months of this year.
trucks with certain number
plates, and the smugglers were
forced to adopt a more complex R
and costly chain system.
Under this method one ve- Daily Classifieds

I

tween Lebanon,

Iran and Tur-

key and the lucrative smoking
grounds of West Germany, Hol-
land and Scandinavia cuts
across the center of the country.
But only in the last three years
has there been an organized
effort to stop it.
In February, 1972, Austria es-
tablished a central office for
fighting drug abuse and smug-
gling throughout the country,
which has formed close links

partment was set up 4,840
pounds were seized.
"UNTIL THE bureau was
formed, Austria was regarded
as an easy thoroughfare .
people would just drive in and
out with no fear of being
searched," said Ernst Hoff-
man, head of the Vienna-based
drugs department.
Dr. Hoffman, an alert, white-
haired professional detective
.with 32 years of police work be-

WHERE DO YOU GO AROUND
HERE TO MEET SOME NEAT
PEOPLE?
HAVE YOU BEEN

AP Photo
A GATE CRASHER at the Syracuse, N.Y. rock concert is held back by a state trooper. Billed as the "Great American Music
Fair," the concert featuring the Beach Boys and the Doobie Brothers turned into a confrontation as some 500 riot equipped
police moved onto the site to maintain order after the crowd became unmanageable.

class
elect h

Crowds, police clash during
New York state rock show

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (/P) - The Concert promoter John Scher1
Great American Music Fair characterized the rock extra-
wound up its day-long run early vaganza as a "financial catas-
Wednesday after several clash- trophe, but otherwise very re-
es between club-swinging state warding." He said he stood to
police and hundreds of gate- lose "in the neighborhood of a
crashing youngsters, and 13 quarter of a million dollars."

thers, America, Jefferson Star-
ship, New Riders of the Pur-
ple Sage and the Stanky Brown
Group. It began about noon
Tuesday and ended about 1
a.m. Wednesday following a 75-
minute set by the Beach Boys.

hours of nonstop rock.I
State police said at least 20 SCHE
troopers and 10 youngsters wouldh
were hurt during the melees him to1
on Tuesday. A spokesman said hoped t
most of the -injuries were cuts timated
and bruises. He. said most of tween X
the troopers were injured by Ticke
thrown objects. and $15
HIE SAID 94 persons were!The
arrested, most onrcharges ofBeach1
disorderly conduct.
State police, sheriff's depu- [
ties and Syracuse city police
were called to the concert at
the State Fairgrounds by pri-
vate security guards after
youths being held outside the
gates because they wouldn't
buy tickets tried to force their.
way in.
In a final confrontation at
midafternoon, about 75 helmet-
ed state troopers manning the
gates rushed the rain-drench-
ed crowd of about 2,000, tossing
tear-gas cannisters and swing-
ing nightsticks.
MANY in the crowd threw'
rocks, bottles and other ob-j
jects, state police said.
"There were nasty kids out!
there . . . We took their crap
for about four hours before we
used the gas," said Capt. Ken-
neth Crounse. "We took a lot1
of injuries before we went after
them."k

R had said ticket sales The concertgoers began pour-
have to top 60,000 for ing through two gates at the
break even and he had fairgrounds about 6 a.m. and
to draw 100,000. He es-
Tuesday's crowd at be- romped and danced to recorded
35,000 and 40,000. music in ankle-deep mud in the
ts cost $11 in advance infield of the one-mile oval
at the gate. race track for about six hours
concert featured the before the first group appeared
Boys, the Doobie Bro- ! on stage.

-U

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