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December 06, 1975 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-12-06

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"'.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- Saturday, December 6, 1975

Ciwch

WpOPAIft 1eoice4

City man wins in
motorcycle appeal

Peoples'

probe for

King murder,
By DAVID GARFINKEL ; much 'in-protection.'"

asked
VAUGHN EXPRESSED out-

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662-4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion-Wednesday,
5:15-5:50 p.m.
Young Adult meals - Sunday,
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
Christian Reformed Worship.
Sunday Worship-10 a.m. and
6 p.m.
*~* *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Gordon Ward, Pastor
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 6:00
p.m. ($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. Sunday-Adult Bible
study.
8:00-9:00 p.m. Monday-semi-
nar 9on:Dietrich Bonhoeffer's
"The Cost of Discipleship."
12:00-1100 Thursday - Thurs-
day Forum (includes lunch, $1).'
Chancel C h o i r - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For other information on the
Young Adult Program call the
Rev. Peter C. Budde or Jo Ann
Staebler, 662-4466.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
StudentsrWelcome.
'For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m.-Communion Serv-
ice-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Church
School.
Serihon: "The Time of Your
Life," Donald B. Strobe.
Worship Services are broad-
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION NEWS
Sunday, Dec. 7:
5:30 p.m.-Supper.
6:15 p.m.- Tree trimming
party followed with the celebra-
tion about 8:30.
7:30 p.m.-Grads-Rabbi Joel
discusses Rabbi, Jesus and re-
lated topics in the Green Room.
Thursday, Dec. 11:
6:30 p.m.-Grad Dinner.
7:30 p.m.-Program focusing
on questions and concerns about
the marriage relationship.
** *
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 6656149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
10:00 a.m.-Church School.
Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
ice.
Service broadcast on WNRS
(1290 AM).
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Bible S:udy
at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
at 10:00 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 N. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship--11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal)
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
and Sermon.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
. Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;
10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
days.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.

By LOIS JOSIMOVICH
A city man won his appeal
yesterday of a two month old
traffic citation for violating a
law struck down by the State
Court of Appeals in 1968.
James Denzer, a 26 year old
employe at University Hospital,
was ticketed on October 14 for
riding his motorcycle without a
helmet. He claims his bare-
headed ride was a further probe
of the police department's policy
on the obsolete statute, under
which he had previously been
fined.
"I decided, the hell with this,
I'm going to challene this," said
Denzer.
He refused to pay the $26 fine
for his October 14 ticket, ap-
pealing instead to the county
court for a dismissal of the
case. Yesterday he received a
letter from the county prosecu-
tor's office stating that all
charges have been dropped.
According to state law, a mo-
torcyclist must wear a helmet

while riding. However, in "1968
the city's American Motor-
cyclists Association appealed the
law, losing at the county level
bunt winning finally in the State
Court of Appeals.
"THE INDIVIDUAL is still'
master of his fate and captain
of his soul," declared the panel
of judges in that case. "(He is)
not accountable to society for
his actions so far as these con-
cern the interests of no person
but himself.".
Since that ruling, the city
charter law only requires that
motorcyclists have a helmet on
the bike for each rider. How-
ever, police have the option of
enforcing either the city or the
state law, and have been going
by the state statute.
Since Denzer's was the first
city case appealed, police pro-
cedures may change in the near
future. An official police state-
ment on the matter was unavail-
able.

State Representative Jackie I
Vaughn (D - Detroit) yesterday'
called upon President Ford to
launch a "people's investiga-
tion" into the 1968 assassination
of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
In Montgomery, Ala., black
leaders and. King's widow, Co-
retta, also called for an "inde-
pendent" investiation of the
assassination.
IN A TELEPHONE interview'
yesterday Vaughn said, "I don't
think you can ask for a
governmental investigation. It
seems to me that there is too

L
t
1
t
it
it
t
i
C

AATA

Vaughn has introduced an in- rage over the disclosure. "It's
vestigation resolution co-signed obvious that one of the worst
by 29 representatives into the miscarriages of justice was per-
State House. He said there is a petrated on Dr. King," he said.
"very, very good chance" that! "The black community has al-
it will pass. I"h lc orui a l
Vaughn's resolution comes in ways been aware of this, but
the wake of recent disclosures we had no idea that they (the
that the FBI conducted a six- FBI) were that involved."
year campaign against the black The Detroit Democrat stress-
1 e a d e r. These' disclosures, ed that the investigation must
Vaughn said, "have raised ser- ° be "fair," conducted by an "out-
ious questions that this hideous standing blue ribbon panel. If
killing could have been part of we are to have a complete and
a government conspiracy and thorough airing, we cannot en-
could not have been the work of trust it to the "Justice Depart-
one man alone." ment or the CIA."
Hoffa thought
dead in N.J.,
(Continued from Page 1) abduction of Hoffa.
one into an informant who is, The Teamsters will appear be-
close to the killing." fore the witnesses in a police
The source said authorities lineup at the Oakland County
are operating on the theory that jail. Robert Ozer, head of the
Hoffa got into a car voluntarily Task Forcein Detroit,adisclosed
outside the Machus Red Fox in open court earlier this week
Restaurant on July 30, was kill- the lineup was sought to corro-
ed and his body then hauled out borate grand jury testimony
to the East, Coast, where it was from yet another secret inform-
buried in the dump. ant.

worker,

'S

if
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

Hij acked
(Continued from Page 1)
besieged building, parading hi
with a gun at his back.
The hostage paraded on t
balcony was at first identifi
by a police spokesman as a v
man, but he said later tf
photographs confirmed the v
tim was a young man.
THE LONG - HAIRED you
was pushed out on the balco
with a length of electrical cal
around his neck. One of t
gunmen marched him up a
down, pulling the noose tigh
and prodding him with a g
barrel.
A blue-striped t a b I e c 1 o
served as a blindfold for t
youth, who wore a green t-shi
The first time he was left
the balcony for about 15 m
utes. Several hours later t
gunmen paraded him again.
POLICE SAID they were r
particularly worried about t
fate of the children still in t
consulate since one gunman ti
them on the telephone: "Soldie
do not fight children."
The freed children were tak
for medical and psychologic
tests at an Amsterdam hospi
Association of
Jewish Grads
BRUNCH-
Sunday, Dec. 7
Bagels & Lox-75c
11 a.m.
at H LLELL-
1429 Hill St.

Dutch train
m where they were being reunited contract
with their parents. (Continued from Page 1)
The terrorists Thursday de- mains in effect. But Schurman'
he manded from the Indonesian charged: "The offer was es-
embassy in the Hague that they sentiall not a new offer. It
w-be given a plan to escape the --
hat country. They also demanded the contains the same economic of-
cic- fer that has been on the table
release of South Moluccans held for a month."
in Dutch prisons on charges of She added, "We were led to
uth terrorist actionhand Dutch rec- Se adey "We w ld
iiognition of what they called I believe they (AATA) would
ny their government in exile, present a new offer.
ble Berla said he was "disan-
the THE PRIME Minister said the nointed" in the Union's decision
nd Amsterdam group, which seized to reject the contract.
ter therconsulate yesterday, had ACCORDTNG to Berla the ne-
.clearly staged its action to sup- tiations are centering primar-
port the train hijacking on Tues iv around economic issues.
th dayRwever,Schrman savs no
the He said the government still agreerent lis been reache on
rt. had several policy options open e meta i en rectron
an reral aon-Pconmic p~P~t~nns.
n in dealing with the two groups-' T",se include "work rules." I
in- persuasion, patiently waiting and . . .,f
"the use of force. " h nn tordav. when the
^T A annrnnes iwhat servicesj
April 3-4, 1974, about 100 tor- it rill nrovide in case of a
'ot nadoes brought death and de- « 'r ~ r ovd ncaeo
he struction to 14 states in the ""er
he Midwest and South. An esti- .In "" en asfA "We are br to
old mated 329 died; 6,142 were in- all citiens of A Arbor to
ers jured; 13,458 houses and 3,000 boycott that service.
mobile homes were destroyed . JPANESE ARE
en The period was the worst IJAANS IPE
cal known outbreak of super tor- YBUILDING SHIPS
tal ndoes.NEW YORK (AP) - Last
tal nadoes. year, the Japanese built moreI
------~ than half of the world's volume
W EST SIDE of new ship tonnage, reports
Ii BOOK "The CIompass," a publication!
BOOK SHOP of MO Asarine insurane
..underwriter

The closed-down landfill re-
portedly is owned by Philip
Moscato, 41. New Jersey sourc-
es say Moscato includes among'
his close associates a number
of known underworld figures
but is not a known member of
a mob family. Moscato does not
have any convictions, the
sources said.
MEANWHILE, government;
prosecutors planned a lineup to-
day to show three New Jersey
Teamsters officials to a secret
witness who says he say the'
Fo r
pledges
Asian

Christmas Art Fair

I

FINE USED & RARE BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
"
113 W. Libertv-995-1891
"
OPEN SUNDAYS
12:00-5:00 P.M.
"
Mon. -Sat.
11:00 a.m.-6:00 P.M.
Thurs. & Fri. Nites
tit 9:00 P.M.

Japan launched 17.5 million
gross tons of ships in 1974 which
constituted 51.6 per cent of the
ship tonnage world-wide, accord-
ing to "The Compass." The pub-
lication notes that Sweden was
second in ship production with
2.2 million tons, or 6.4 per cent
of world ship tonnage, and West
Germany was third with 2.1 mil-
lion tons, or 6.1 per cent.

I

The University
of Michigan
Artists & Craftsmen
Guild

Saturday, December 6,10 a.m.-6p.m
Sunday, December 7 Noon-6 p.m.
Pendleton Room and Ballroom
2nd floor, Michigan Union

I

Ulll

1

NATIVE AMERICAN TRADITION and a SPIRIT OF PLACE

4:00
Monday
Dec. 8

ONANDAGA, Faith

Keeper

OREN LYONS

"We come, then, to both a necessity to change and a possibility to do
so. In attempting to contrast the world views of the American Indian
with the imported assumptions if the immigrants who have been unable
to find roots in this land, we can do no worse than to identify alterna-,
tive paths to choose. The choice, of course is another matter.", God
is Red, p. 74
PENDLETON LOUNGE, 2nd floor Mich. Union
OFFICE OF ETHICS AND RELIGION-764-7442
"NI E A*N f
LIQUID SILVER CHOKERS
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
& :ADDITIONAL CHOKERS CAN BE PURCHASED
FOR $5.95 up to a limit of four
A special purchase from the Indians by a
Trader Tad makes this offer possible
-COUPON-
... ADDED BONUS ...
Do your Christmas shopping early
and on a $30 purchase you receive a
30% DISCOUNT.

i
;
1
I

support
(Continued from Page 1)
Chinese capital.
En route to Jakarta a senior
American official aboard Air'
Force One told newsmen the
most important benefits derived
from the Peking summit were
the triangular aspects of diplo-
macy - the balancing off of
China, the Soviet Union and the
United States.
THE OFFICIAL who declined.
to be identified, sketched in
broad strokes what diplomats
call the "wide-ranging" impact j
of U. S.-China policy. It is bas-
ed on "parallelism" and seeks
to establish the points on which
both sides see eye to eye, espe-s
cially in discouraging Soviet ex-
pansionism.
The American president,don
his first official visit to Indone-!
sia noted in his banquet speech
that there have been dramatic!
changes in the world, with all
but thevestiges of colonial em-
pires and cold war divisions*
broken down.
"In this complex time of
change, America, as always,
looks to its relationships with
friends," he said. "Indonesia is'
such a friend. Indonesia exem-
plifies strength, and self-reli-
ance, as well as international
leadership and responsibility.
We respect your nonalignment
and your goal of national resil-
iency. We admire your contri-
bution to regional peace. We
value your friendship."
* * 00@ e
7.There IS a~
£difference! !
* PREPARE FOR:
MCAT over 35 years
: tii* of experience "
" A and success "
AT Small classes
LSAT Voluminous home
GRE study materials
ATGSB constantly updated
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U"A reviews of class
CPAT of supplementary
" FLEX materials
" Make-ups for "
ECFMsedlessons"
NAT'L MED DS
" write or call:
0 1 4 5 auline HBv d .

Ozer said that man appeared
before the grand jury and nam-
ed three men alleged to have
abducted the former Teamsters
boss.
OZER'S disclosure that a
grand jury witness named
names and that an individual
who witnessed Hoffa's abduc-
tion had been found are the
most startling devedopments in
the more than four-month-old
case.
The, witness who will watch
the police lineup does not know
the names of the men he saw
pull off the abduction, Ozer
said. However, he conceivably
could recognize the men if he
saw them again. Ozer said the
witness had not apneared before
the grand jury but probably
wo,,d if he corroborated the
story from the government in-
formant.
The three men were asked to
anear in the lineup by the
grand jury probing the Hoffa
disappearance. They declined to
do so, but Ozer received a
court order annroving the lineup
from U. S. District Court Judge
James P. Churchill in an un-
scheduled hearing.
THOSE APPEARING before
the witness will be Salvatore
Briguglio, 47, of Paramus, N.J.
his brother Gabriel, 36, of East
Rutherford, N.J. and Thomas
Andretta,'38, of Hasbrouck
Heights, N. J.
A fourth man who appeared
before the secret panel, Steph-
en Andretta, was not asked to
participate in the lineup.
However, Ozer said he would
seek a grant making Stephen
Andretta immune from prose-
cation in exchange for grand
jury testimony.
Rent
strike
a Press'
(Continued from Page 1)
denied any financial difficulties
as a result of the strike and said
"I want to deal with tenants on
a one to one basis - a human
level."

HOWEVER, Cooperman
lieves Sunshine's "high rent
low maintenance" do not
stitute a human level.

be-
and
con-

rate
decines
(Continued from Page 1)
The drop in the national un-
employment rate was attribut-
able largely to the fact that the
size of the civilian labor force,
which is made up of both those
who are working and those who
say they are looking for a job,
declined slightly in November.
AT THE SAME time there
was a modest decline in the
number of business which add-

A shot against cancer?

One day the scariest thing about cancer

And the promise for the future is stag.

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