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December 05, 1975 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-12-05

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Page Ten'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, December 5, 1975

_IiTRAVEL TO PURDUE

Zlichigan women gymnasts debut

TONIGHT! Double Feature in MLB
TOM SMOTHERS, KATHERINE ROSS, and ORSON WELLES in
GET TO KNOW YOUR RABBIT
(Brian DePalma, 1971) MLB 3-7, 8:45, & 10:30
Tom Smothers, John Austin, Katherine Ross, Orson Welles. This offbeat comedy has
been undeservedly neglected, for it was easily the funniest film of 1971. Director
wePalma does a superb iob of handling this odd cast (With the exception of Welles
who, of course, handles himself).
DON'T LOOK NOW
(Nicolas Roeg, 1973) MLB 4--7 & 9*
This macabre, nothic horror story about clarvoyance and communication with the dead
is unforgettable-from the erotic love scene between Julie Christie and Donald Suther-
land to the violent, numbing climax. Shot in Venice by Nicolas Roeq (PERFORMANCE),
the cinematocraphv alone is worth the price of admission.
$2,00 DOUBLE FEATURE-$1.25 SINGLE SHOW
NEXT WEEK: KING OF HEARTS, SISTERS, GREASERS PALACE

1
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,

By MICHAEL WILSON
Michigan's brand new wo-
men's gymnstics team debuts
this weekend as it travels to
Bloomington, Indiana for the
second annual Big Ten women's
gymnastics meet. It is the first
competition for the young Mich-
igan squad which was just form-
ed this fall.
Eight schools from the con-
ference will be represented in
the two day tournament. Today,
the balance beam and floor ex-
ercise performances will take
place and on Saturday, compe-
tition on the uneven bars and
vaulting will occur.
This year's team is coached
by a trio of gymnastics veter-
ans. Newt L o k e n, present
coach of Michigan's men's

team, heads up the staff which
includes Linda Morton, coach
of Ann Arbor's highly success-
ful YWCA gymnastics pro-
gram, and Bruce Keeshin,
former co-captain of the de-
fending Big Ten gymnastic
champion Michigan Wolver-
ines.
"This will be the women's
first Big Ten meet and they've
had only a short time to pre-
pare," Loken said. "They're
fired up and eager to enter the
competition."
Lineups for Michigan are:
* All-around - Dot Summers
and Laura Ross
* Balance Beam-Nancy Kur-
land or Lisa Prokurat, Sue Rey-
nolds, Sandy Burak and Linda
Laatsch or Dot Macut
* Floor Exercise - Reynolds,
Laatsch, Burak, Kurland
Uneven Bars-Laatsch, Bu-
rak or Chris Van Raalte, Sandy
Laatsch and Vickie Crant
* Vaulting - Prokurat, Sue
Stanton, Burak, Van Raalte

The women tumblers have
been working out since mid-
October down in the old Coli-
seum. Up to this point, Mich-
igan h-s had no meet-like
competition. A scrimmage
meet was held with Western
Michigan's team earlier this
fall and though no team score
was tallied, Loken feels the
Wolverines performed well.
"They have a lot of potential,'.'
said Morton. "And they're not
lacking in enthusiasm."
Nonetheless, it would be 'pure'
speculation to predict howMich-
igan will finish. "Not having
seen any of the other teams in
action," Loken said, "the wo-
men are in the dark as to how
they'll fare."
The eight Big Ten schools who
have entered teams for the
tournament are Michigan, Wis-
consin, Illinois, Ohio State, Mich-
igan State, Minnesota, Indiana
and Northwestern.

Men visit Ball State
By SCOTT LEWIS Iffair. Only four performers
from each school will compete.
Coming off of a fairly impres- The top three scores in each
sive performance in the Midwestvent will count toward the
Open last weekend, the men's team score.
gymnastics team travels to Mun-t s
cie, Indiana to compete in the Thirteen teams will vie for
Ball State Invitational tonight. thtn t-mwimidesfrn
the~. to~J0SS s *tL *it W midwestern

CHRISTMAS-NEW YEAR'S SPECIAL
Any 7 Or More Consecutive Days Between
DEC. 10-JAN. 7
SRENT
$12.95 PER DAY, UNLIMITED MILEAGE
UP TO 200 MILES A DAY
RENTABEETLE 994-9300 1820 Packard
,rr a dr* r t i s { rt; sr

All of the Wolverine tumblers}
who will perform at Ball State
had a week of rest, as Coach
Newt Loken has chosen to alter-
nate squads on two successive
weekends.
Seniors P i e r r e Leclerc,
Richard Bigras, and Bob Dar-
den, as well as freshman Nigel
Rothwell-the all-around con-
tingent of the squad-will rep-
resent Michigan.
The meet is strictly a team

pIIC LP6U, WLI ILWS~
schools dominating the repre-
sentation. Michigan definitely
figures as one of the top com-
petitors, but many other fine
teams will perform.
Among the teams to watch
are Big Eight representatives
Nebraska and Oklahoma. Other
Big Ten representatives are Wis-
consin, Indiana, and Illinois.
Looking over the list of teams
competing, Loken commented,
"It's going to be a fine tourna-
ment."

WCHA Standings

W

L

T

Pts GF

Mich. State 8 2 0 16 34
Mich. Tech 6 4 0 12 45
Colo. Co. 5 3 0 10 42
MICHIGAN S 3 0 10 43
Minnesota 5 3 0 10 29
Minn-Duluth S 5 0 10 45
Denver 4 6 0 8 34

GAl
32
39
40
30
20
40
45

NCAA acts on MSU violations;

charges, penalties undisclosed

Notre Dame 4 6 0

8 45 50 EAST LANSING (M)-The Na-

Wisconsin

2 6 0 4 33

41 tional Collegiate Athletic Asso-
6n ciation has issued its decision

President Clifton R. Whatron Jr.
Jack Shingleton, MSU athletic
director, was not immediately

N. Dakota 2 8 0

4 37

vv

U -Towers

and proposed penalties in a case available for comment.
involving alleged Michigan State "Michigan S t a t e University
University football recruiting has received the decision of the
violations, the school said yes- NCAA Committee on Infractions
terday. and will be appealing certain
"The University has been or- findings and proposed penalties
dered by the NCAA not to reveal in their decision," Wharton said
either the findings or the pro-fin a terse statement issued
posed penalties," said MSU from his office.

The appeal will be heard by
the NCAA council Jan. 11-13,
Wharton said.
An MSU sports information
officer added: "That is all there
is to be said from here at this
time. The NCAA has a long
standing policy of saying noth-
ing" until investigations are
completed.
The NCAA and MSU have kept
a tight lid on the investigation
and it has not been disclosed
publicly who made the original
complaints about football re-
cruiting.
Most observers believe the
probe centers around MSU's ef-
forts to recruit high school play-
ers in the Midwest, especially
Ohio.

ate.

portedly took and passed lie
detector tests prior to appearing
before the NCAA infractions
committee in Denver in Octo-
ber.
The Detroit News has said
there are indications MSU will
be put on probation.

.,,...._ ____._ _._.._ .....__ __.,......e.m..

An Open Le tter to the
University Community
On the night of November 10, 1938, the Nazi Party staged a program against the
Jews throughout Germany. This night has come to be known in Jewish history as
KRISTALLNACHT-"Night of the Broken Glass," for the moon glistened in the streets
on the pieces of glass from the broken windows of synagogues, Jewish 'homes, and
places of business. This is a day of infamy in Jewish history. On the same day, thirty
seven years later, November 10, 1975, it is evident that little has changed. It is
ironic that on this day the General Assembly of the United Nations voted to designate
Zionism as a form of racism. The coincidence of dates should not be lost on us. The
commonality of purpose is the same.
The resolution of the General Assembly has ramifications beyond the current situation
in the Middle East. This resolution makes a simple statement, namely, that irrespective
of the issues of borders, interim agreements, Palestinian claims, Israeli claims, disen-
gagement, etc., etc., the Jewish people have no right to a national liberation move-
ment, to national self-determination, and what is even more odious, that the Jewish
people have no right to collectively define themselves as a nation. This resolution
reminds us only too well of that oft spoken statement, "To the Jews as individuals
everything, to the Jews as a people nothing."
This is the first time since the late Middle-Ages that the ugly and obscene spectre of
internationally approved antisemintism has dared to raise its head among the com-
munity of nations. The implication of the equation of Zionism with racism is quite
simple. Namely, that in the view of the United Nations there can be no resolution of
the problems of the Middle East until the Jewish people surrender their historic and
legitimate claim to a state in the Land of Israel. This is a terrifying expression of anti-
semitism.
The -Jews are, with the exception of the Chinese, the oldest self-governing nation still
active in history. The Jews are the only people in the Middle East still practicing the
religion, speaking the language, and self-identifying as they did in that very some
land and country, Israel, thousands of years ago.
The U.N. resolution gives a hunting license to every antisemite-whether in the Soviet
Union, Latin America, Western Europe, or elsewhere. It tells him that one of the oldest
peoples in the world has no right to exist as a people-to speak its own language,
develop its culture, and live in its homeland. Denial of the- right of Jews to exist as a
people is but one step away from denying Jewish people the right to exist. On the
anniversary of KRISTALLNACHT that point should be clear.
The antisemitic vote of the U.N. cannot alter history. We the undersigned faculty at
the University of Michigan deplore in the strongest terms this resolution of the U.N.
and call upon all people of good will to do likewise.,

Anthony V. DeCello, attorney
for Weyers and Butler said in
October he will go to federal
court if either of his clients are
fond guilty of NCAA recruiting
violations.
During the investigation, re-
porters unearthed details of how
football player Joe Hunt used
a credit card belonging to MSU
booster Thomas Doyle to buy
clothes, and quarterback Char-
lie Bagaett had to return a 1975

I

j~QoLey s

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air#
v4F
IVWAR

TGIF

e

However, other reports say aitomobile he sought in a spe-
the NCAA is looking into about cial paymentdeal.
70 charges of recruiting viola- The program was muddied
tions, most of which are against : further when Burt Smith was
Howard Weyers. suddenly ousted as athletic di-
Weyers, defensive end coach rector in what MSU officials
and MSU's chief Ohio recruiter, claimed was an unrelated move
and Charlie Butler, who coaches to shore up administration of
offensive guards and centers, re- the program.

Thank God It's Friday
Today
and every Friday

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15c Hot Dogs

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2-5 P.M.

WHILE THEY LAST

Movies every Mon. & Tues. Nites
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT, Sunday, 8-
11 p.m. featuring RUSS TROMBLEY
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT, Monday, 9-
12 midnight featuring Steve Sofferin

rol

NO COVER
310 MAYNARD

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Bizarre and
NEW LOCATI
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With This Coupon 0
OPEr
MONDAY
.66

Prof. Monroe Z. Hafter (Romance Languages)
Prof. Gerald D. Abrams (Pathology)
Prof. Elliot Juni (Microbiology)
Dr. David Schteingart (Internal Medicine)
Prof. Arthur Schwartz (Math)
Prof. Albert J. Silverman (Psychiatry)
Prof. J. G. Wendel (Math)
Dr. Stephen P. Bloom (Pediatrics)
Prof. Peter Bauland (Engineering)
Dr. Henry D. Appelman (Pathology)
Dr. Barbara A. Threatt (Radiology)
Dr. Robert A. Green (Medical School)
Prof. Marvin B. Becker (History)
Prof. I. A. Bernstein (School of Public Health)
Prof. Marvin Brandwin (Psychiatry)
Prof. Robert Segal (Social Work)
Prof. Raphael Ezekiel (Psychiatry)
Prof. J. C. Catford ((Linguistics)
Prof. Sheldon Siegel (Social Work)
Prof. Deborah Keller-Cohen (Linguistics)
Ms. Ziona Kopelovich ((Near East Studies)
Prof. Raoul Kopelman (Chemistry)
Ms. Charlotte Kearney (Psychology)
Prof. Joel Isaacson ((Art History)
Prof. Steven Kaplan (Psychology)
Prof. Rachel Kaplan (Natural Resources)
Prof. David Guttman (Psychology)
Prof. Paul Glasser ((School of Social Work) '
Prof. Lois Glasser (School of Public Health)
Prof. Ronald U. Rosen (Math)
Prof. Morris Foster (Biological Science)
Prof. David Krantz (Psychiatry)
Dr. Arnold Monto (School of Public Health)
Joseph Hoshen (Chemistry)
Ms. Shula Reinharz (Psychology)
Dr. Saul Harrison (Psychiatry)
Prof. Sylvan Kornblum (MHRI)
Prof. Stanley Siegel (Law School)
Dr. Monica Starkman (Psychiatry)
Prof. Sidney Gendin (Philosophy)
Prof. William Gerler (Psychology)
Prof. Martin Sichel (Engineering)
Prof. Ernst Fontheim (Engineering)
Prof. Harold Levinson (Economics)
Dean Wilbur Cohen (School of Education)
Dean William Haber (School of Education)
Dr. Milton Mutchnick (Medicine)
Drf -- Rrn- RonM ofRnei, Wnrk

Dr. Raulf Polichar (Physics)
Dr. Pary Goldberg (Internal Medicine)
Dr. Bernard Portner
Prof. Bernard A. Galler (Computer Center)
Prof. Otto Graf (German)
Prof. Zelda Gamson (Education)
Dr. Isadore Lampe (Medicine)
Prof. Carl Gans (Biology)
Prof. Z. H. Weisfeld (Speech)
Dr. Ivan Sherick (Psychiatry)
Dean Rudolf Schmerl (Education)
Prof. Paul Ilie (Romance Languages)
Mr. William Benjamin (Music)
Prof. William Gamson (Sociology)
Prof. William Martel (Medicine)
Prof. Enoch Brater (English)
Dr. Bennett Cohen
Dr. Alexander Z. Gulora (Psychiatry)
Dr. Daniel B. Doodman (Intemal Medicine)
Prof. Steven Lavine (English)
Prof. Zvi Gitelman (Political Science)
Prof. Edna Coffin (Near East Studies)
Prof. Armand Lauffer (School of Social Work)
Prof. Tony Tripodi (School of Social Work)
Prof. Samuel Krimm (Physics)
Dr. Henry Gershowitz (Human Genetics)
Prof. David Aminoff (Medicine)
Prof. Sidney Fine (History)
Prof. Myron Levine (Human Genetics)
Prof. Veskel Hasenfeld (Social Work)
Dr. Phillip Margolis (Psychiatry)
Dr. George Siegel (Neurology)
Prof. Byron Roe (Physics)
Prof. Terrence Tice (Education)
Prof. Victor Miesel (History of Art)
Prof. Richard L. Park (Political Science)
Prof. James L. Miller, Jr. (Education)
Prof. Frederick H. Wagman (Library)
Prof. Norma Diamond (Anthropology)
Prot. Noah Sherman (Physics)
Prof. Pauline Sherman (Aerospace Engineer-
ing)
Prof. Roman Szporluk (History)
Dr. William Chameides (Engineering)
Prof. Benjamin J. Darsky (School of Public
Health)
Prof. James Robertson (English)
P..f Rnc Va.nt.i.Miarv - ea

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
THE ACTING COMPANY
USHER APPLICATION
NAMF
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE__ U of M l.D. No.

l
"..

6

. RULES
1. You must be a U of M student.

,,

2. You must choose your series in order of preference.
3. Married students may send applications toqether.
4. This application must be posted by U.S. mail on or
after Tuesday, December 9, 1975. Mail to: Usher The
Actinq Company, Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor,
Michicin. 48109.
5. Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
PLEASE NUMBER CHOICE 1, 2, 3, 4
CHOICE
SERIES A: Friday. January 16; Wednesday. January
21; Thursday, January 29; Friday, February 6
(Performances at 8:00 p.m.)
SERIES B: Saturday, January 17; Thursday, January
22: Saturday, January 31: Saturdv February 7
(Performances at 8:00 p.m.)
SERIES C: Sunday Matinees at 3:00 p.m.; January

/ rji//y%/\..din'th u st Jeans a '.
Givin' an getn th JutJen wy.

®

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