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December 03, 1975 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-12-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Smusic in review Wednesday, December 3, 1975 Page Five

iii

Jon'sla es L offers

JEAN RENOIR FESTIVAL 1954
FRENCH CAN-CAN
Film critic Andrew Sarris called this the great-
est cusical ever made. A colorful film that is
highlighted by lavish scenes. It is certainly the
best can-can film of all time. Jean Gabin plays
a night club owner who stages the most spec-
tocular cabaret conceivable - The Moulin
Rouge.
JEAN RENOIR FESTIVAL
Thursday: THE SOUTHERNER
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH
Cinema Guild 7:00 and 9:05 AUD.
Adm. $1.25
Subscribe to The Daily-Phone 764-0558

free-spiritee
By KURT HARJU attitude she is adopting on the
On The Hissing Of Summer new album. She is less the love-
Lawns (Asylum 7E-1051), Joni sick lady mourning the end of
Mitchell takes an ambitious and an affair and more the woman
perceptive look at the type of of the world observing the
life American society offers to changing scene.
a free-spirited artist like herself.' In "Shades Of Scarlet Con-
While she does not totally reject quering," her cinematic, south-
or condemn the AmericanI ern belle declares "a woman
Dream, she yearns for some- ' must have everything" and she
thing more. means more than just Clark
"Conceived graphically, mu-t Gable.
sically, lyrically and accidental-
ly-as a whole," this package HER MUSIC too has grown
is the first major collection of more confident-she's now a
new material to be released by first-class composer of sophisti-
Joni in two years. Hissing shows cated musical structures, ar-
a creative mind working in full rangements and sound effects;
gear on a thematic song cycle. judging by the album's impres-
that is the most challenging sive sonics. It's a considerable
effort of her illustrious career. achievement as Mitchell is now
working without the guidance
SUPERFICALLY, the record of Tom Scott who originally
is an extension of the electronic, helped shape the group sound
jazz-influenced compositions she on her last three albums.
initiated on Court And Spark On this release, Joni is trying
and, most recently, Miles Of to establish her place in the
Aisles. ranks of pop music's elite. She's
But there are striking dif- a star but success is turning out
ferences in the mood and the'to be less than she expected.

jazzrock
The first song, "In France gowns.
They Kiss On Main Street,"
celebrates freedom, romance The aspect of contemporary
and creation as the human and living that she really dislikes is
artistic ideals to which she I the bureaucratic and techno-
aspires. But, in "The Boho lagical maze. "Harry's House'
Dance," she realizes that she's effectively destroys the myth of
still much the same person as suburban bliss by including the
|when she was a struggling folk- classic Johnny Mandel-Jon Hen-
singer from Canada: dricks tune of unrequitted love
"Centerpiece," within the pes-
Nothing is capsulized in me simistic context of her song.
On eithe ci e4An£, fcrn

'1
°
.

STAR TS TOMORROW

The streets were never really
mine te ga r
Not mine these glamour

INSTRUMENTAL s u p p o r t
varies from solo guitar to full
See JONI'S, Page 8

CHANUKAH DINNER PARTY
at H I LLEL
WED., DEC. 3 -5:30 - 7:30
50c
-SINGING AND DANCING-

'4j V

Daly Photo by STUART HOLLANDER
Joni Mitchell

1429 HiLL ST.

Ph. 663-3336

i

Clarke scarce on

'Journey'

By STEPHEN HERSH
QTANLEY CLARKE is one of
the more conspicuous of the
new wave of electric jazz heav-
ies. He's a dazzling bassist-this
he demonstrated at Hill Audi-
torium a couple of months ago
as a member of Chick Corea's
band, Return to Forever.
His playing is the fastest and
most fluent around, and the.
wierd metallic tones he gets
out of his Alembic brand bass
mark his sound as completely
distinctive.
But Clarke's own playing un-
fortunately isn't spotlighted on
his latest album, Journey to
Love (Nemperor NE 433). As
an arranger, he employs a va-I
riety of jazz and rock styles to
build effective compositions. A
solo recording, though, is the

best place for a back-up musi- background-but they're scarce. Still, Duke's synthesizer solos
cian to showcase his talents as And in the tunes featuring are a telling contrast to Beck's,
a soloist. And on this album, guitarist Jeff Beck, Clarke is because they're so agile and
though we hear a lot from hardly in evidence. Those num- forceful. Duke is right at home
George Duke and Jeff Beck, we bers show Beck to be just a playing fast, furious, warbling
don't hear enough of Clarke. mite out of his element in a solos. And that fast, furious
ONE OF Clarke's bass lines jazz group, as he seemed to be playing is the essence of this
is the first thing we do hear on in the Eddie Harris album of a electric jazz.
the opening tune, "Silly Putty." couple years ago, E.H. in the
He plucks out a springy riff, U.K. IT ISN'T only the electric
based on a set of descending BOTH ON Journey to Love stuff that's fast. "Song to
chord changes, and when he and on the Harris record, Beck's John," dedicated to John Col-
finally hits bottom he thumps solos are slightly more hesitant trane, is a two-part acoustic
out a short, funky lick which and less fluid than those of the composition featuring John Mc-
leads into a keyboard burst. other musicians-the musicians Laughlin on guitar and Chick
It's keyboard player George schooled in jazz-participating Corea on piano. It starts off
Duke who dominates the rest in the sessions. slowly, with Clarke gently bow-
of the song. It sounds a lot like But his solos are good be- ing a double bass.
the song "Funny - Funk" on cause the notes are well-chosen. Later, the pace picks up. All
Duke's album Feel. It's syn- And the tough, loud rock 'n' roll the instruments state a speedy
copated and spirited, and some chords he plays on "Hello Jeff" unison theme, and then they
of Clarke's bass riffs do occa- i add a nice touch, reminiscent take turns playing rapid-fire
sionally bubble up from the of his album Beck Ola. solos.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE UNION BOX OFFICE
FOR MORE INFO CALL 763-1107
W'AbJ1n kAVCT.IPY1W;.:

ARE YOU TIRED OF THE SAME SEXIST
STORY LINE IN MUSICAL COMEDIES?
Well Here's a change of pace .
Free To Be You and Me

Musselwhite plays traditional

It's here that
some of his best
album, pluckingl
rumbling riffs.

Clarke does
work on the
lightning-fast,

I

blues wit

By JOAN BORUS
JT DOESN'T seem like many,
people have heard of Charlie
Musselwhite, save for hard core
blues freaks, and that's a
shame. When he decided to title
his latest album Leave the,
Blues to Us, (Capitol ST-11450)
he wasn't boasting by any
means. Just listen to the LP
once and you'll be content to
leave the blues to Charlie and
the other fine musicians on this
album.
Few harp players are able to
match Charlie's performance.
His harmonica style is mellow,
throaty, and incisively honed.
He can bend a blue note on
the harp the way B.B. King does
on the guitar and is also able to
skillfully weave and interact his
solos within the context of the
song.
Scott-Heron
concert
scheduled
This Friday night, December
5, blackpoet and musician Gil
Scott-Heron will appear in con-
cert with The Midnight Band
at the Michigan Theatre as part
of the After Midnight Concert
Series.
Hailed by Clive Davis as a
star for the seventies, Scott-
Heron made his first mark on
mass consciousness by penning.
"The Revolution Will Not Be;
Televised," which was later
picked up the group LaBelle.1
Reserved tickets for the per-
formance will be sold at the
door or before showtime at the
Michigan Union.
Who's to bless
and who's to blame?
W 4 8OLAME a7
ixfuding
EdsyCome On

i
i
I
!'
1
{
}
{t
C

punctuated with a few loud,
A an elecric ouch"CONCERTO for J a z z / Or-
crashing, pompous blasts which
sound like some Return to For-
A STUNNING example of this bluesmen like Big Bill Broonzy. ever songs.
is the first cut on side two,' Similarly, Musselwhite pays That n u m b e r would have
"Candy Kitchen," where Mus- respect to the past with "Early worked better had it been cut
selwhite's wailing harp plays in the Mornin'," song that dates to the length of the few sting-
around Mike Bloomfield's imi- to the inception of the blues. ing solos, by Clarke, Duke, and
tative, high pitched guitar, in In updating the tune, Mussel- the former guitarist for Bruce
a call-and-response pattern that white alters the instrumentation Springsteen, David Sancious.
compliments the interplay be- but works within the three-chord When the spotlights at Return
tween the two instruments. structure of elemental blues to to Forever concerts turn to
The overall musical effect of create one of the best songs Clarke, the bassist invariably
Leave the Blues to Us could on the LP. kicks ass. On Journey to Love,
best be labeled urban blues in: \IUSSELWHITE'S earthy sing- he seems modest. He shouldn't
that it features a brass sec-i. r s earyt g-srelegate himself to the back
tion, electric guitars and piano, ing provides the basic stimulus ground
f h r t 1h ibm grnd

and slick, tight arrangements.F
Yet, as the liner notes point,
out, the difference between ur-
ba n and country blures is diffi-'
cult to define - the basic dif-r
ference being usually one of:
sophistication in the arrange-
mpntc nnl d in t, i tti-,

o~r In ene gy L I IUI.j
His style of vocal inflections
on a cut like Willie Dixon's
"Business Man" shows a
thorough understanding of the
nuances necessary to properly
sing the blues.
Credit must also be given to

ments ana nst rumen~aUOn.
Musslewhite's superb back -up;
DESPITE IllS tendency for a musicians. In addition to per-
higher energy treatment of the; formances by Bloomfield and'
blues, Musselwhite never for- Goldberg, he is augmented by'
gets the tradition from which the King Bee Band, a group of
he came. Side one for example studio musicians whose driving
closes with the traditional bal- rhythm adds a special touch of;
lad, "Key to the Highway," a'polish to Musselwhite's arrange-.
song associated with great ments.

FLICK
of the
FOOT
a multi-art
dance conceit
Dec. 4,5, &
8 p.m.
Schorling Aud
$1.50

A children's musical based on non-sexist, non-
stereotypic writings . . with original music
and song.
It's Beautiful . . . for children and the child"
in all of us..,
OPENING TOMORROW NIGHT
7:30-ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Bldg.
FOR MORE PERFORMANCE TIMES AND
TICKET INFO CALL 763-1107
AC TRAVEL MICH. UNION 763-214
CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
VACATION PACKAGES
SKI PARK CITY UTAH
$285/$299
DECEMBER 30-JANUARY 6
DOMESTIC FLIGHTS
* NEW YORK (LaGuardi)-$79.73
DEPART DEC. 18, 19,20
o DALLAS-$123.73
DEPART DEC. 19
BOSTON-$90.73
DEPART DEC. 19 & 20
SIGN-UP DEADLINE DECEMBER 5TH
For More Information, Call Us at 763-2147
or
Come to 2nd Floor--Michigan Union

THURS., FRI., SAT.
6th Annual
MIN I-FOLK
FESTIVAL

*.
$3.00
with
Michael Cooney
Maggie Pierce
Joe Hickerson
Davey Jones
Owen McBride
30 761-1451

I

A THREE-DAY
MUSICAL PARTY

I!\t * MO Vitt: AT BRIARWOOD
ADJACENT T0 J.C. PENNEY 0769-87800 1-94 $ S.STATE. ANN ARBOR

1421 HILL

8:3

U

Ui

TONIGHT
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, DEC. 3 & 4
DAY FOR NIGHT
(FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT, 1973)
Aud. A-7 & 9

Mm

DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES - Adults $1oo
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. ti 1':30 P.M.
SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
STUDENT & SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNTS
(Except Friday and Saturday Evenings)
BARBRA STREISAND
2ROBERT REDFORD
10:30
f *" "1 6W12:35
2E40 ,E
7:00 +__ ,
9:30h _'

ryf,-s I U Fi,-.i

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