100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 25, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY
rts Enterta inm ent Tuesday, November 25, 1975 Page Five

" "":} *****. * {.:,:::: : .*: *.":"*.::..*:.....r."r-....:: .......".:::.".. . .r. ... ..... ;.....
:" ::.- :, .. ,...-., ...;:.} ".
Bly enraptures audience
with poetry from psyche
By RUSTY GREEN cept December and January, his best work-
"In another 50 or 60 years it's possi- ing months.
ble that you will hear a poetry reading Bly described himself in his youth as
which will be danced," predicted Robert "a neurotic Mid Western Norwegian intel-
Bly, the award-winning poet from Minne- lectual." He served in the Navy in World
sota. War II, graduated from Harvard, then lived
Bly recited poetry, talked, sang and in New York. There he first experienced
played the dulcimer for an enraptured audi- solitude and began to work things out within
ence in the Pendleton Arts Center last his head.
: Tuesday afternoon. "I published my first book when I
While reciting some poems he wore was 36, and had been writing since my
animal masks. "We will have American twenties," says Bly, who has just pub-
poetry return some of the ancient things," lished his tenth book of poems in addi- ?
he said. tion to numerous volumes of translations.
"I'm doing a study of the sound struc- "The process of learning to write is
ture of Beowulf. The ancients had a sensi- not a process of getting published first-
tivity to sound that we don't .have. The it's a slow learning process.
Greeks had 24 meters. English has only t d
one. It's about time that form will enter The idea that you have to be slick
American poetry.,, or professional in order to be a writer
Several hundred people crowded the is very destructive. Your poems in the
Pendleton Room to see Bly. They filled all end have to be like your psyche. You
tenetons Roomto see Bly.r They filed all have to have a friend to read them, to:
n the chairs, sat on the floor, on table tops, criticize them, to say that a line doesn't
.. and lined the walls. The atmosphere was sound like you.
vibrant with emotion, energy and unity. ' you r
Poetry which is true art will bring "When you first start writing most of
NO feeling of unity to the listeners," says Bly. our work will be bd. You ust lo for
wil the lines that are different, that havea
"At certain times everyone in the room willi. ,,te.
feel a sense of unity." weird kind of resonance inthem,"
"When I was a kid, poetry readings Bly feels that poetry gives him energy.
were dull," Bly says. "You get excite- "I have two or three times the energy
meet by bringing in things from the out- now that I had when I was in my twen-
side world, like politics or community, Viet- ties. Part of the reason is that I started
namese dying or blacks in the city. writing which stopped daydreaming.
"That way the listeners can find new "Enegry is drained by daydreaming.
harmonies in their relationships with the Daydreams pass through your unconscious
outside world as the poetry brings change mind in the form of visual symbols. Your
from within the listener." unconscious responds with emotions, and
Bly lives with his wife and four chil- this drains your energy.
dren on the farm he grew up on in west- "The opposite of daydreaming is con-
S ern Minnesota. He rises at 5:30 every morn- centration. There is a world out there.
r ing and meditates for two hours. The forms If you go out, it will take you out of
of meditation may include chanting and your daydreaming.
reading poetry. "The hard work of my day "The problem of the artist is to live
4 is done in the first two hours," he says. with exactly what we are and try to stop
After eating breakfast he will work at daydreaming as much as we can. True
his desk for six straight hours without get- art comes not from the head, but from
ting out of his chair. He translates and the body and the psyche.
writes poetry and writes letters. Every "Delayed reaction is a quality of a
afternoon he takes a nap and then a work of art. Something about a good poem
walk. He spends his evenings with his may strike you two weeks after you've
family. read it.
Poetry readings provide his main source
4 of income. He travels around the country Rusty Green writes about Poet ry and poe/-
z to read for one week of every month ex- ry readings for The Daily.

Folk melodies

:;
:s
:i
k
;7
i
if
t!
t
i
1
J
3
I
!
I
a
3
i
E
F
i
i
I
I
t
I
i

with

'As

You

merge
Like It'

i

By JEAN FLYNN the entirely different idiom of I've done," he says.
With a cap perched on his the American folk-song. For this "I think there is a natural
production transfers the action progression for my scores to
head, Michael Roth can be from the rolling English country- move from Lab to Showcase to
found these days perpetually side to the rustic United States. Guest Artist productions. Writ-
EBrunning back and forth from the That the traditional American ing for the theatre is a skill
Friee Bildig t th Musc sngshave their origins in the that takes a while to assimi "
School, assembling scores and traditional English ballads late he eain.H nti-
onducting orchestra rehearsals made the new setting all the fies the ability to "create theat-
fortducomingh ge artist more interesting and challeng- rical effects" as a major part
You Like it. ing to the composer. of this skill.
Without distorting the lyrical Two summers with the Michi-
Its almost impossible to reach qualities of Shakespeare's text, gan Repertory Company adds
Roth worked on giving it the Ito Michael's experience as a
a hoe no as h sills this proper American "twist." Using composer and arranger. One
multiple role of music director/ the Dorian mode and the banjo season he served as musical di-
composer/arranger for the Pro-j as his major tools, that twistI rector/pianist for the Camelot!
fessional Theatre Program pro- came to life. Roth chose the t Dinner Theatre in Midland
duction, which opens this week Dorian mode since it best echoes
at the Power Center. the tonality of the English bal- Michigan.
Roth has been working on As lad. But including the banjo in. The Jug Band, a country/blue-
You Like It since August, when! the instrumentation helps create grass group Roth belonged to
production director Nicholas the transition to the American in high school, proved itself to
Pennell initially chose him as setting. This transition is made be a source of inspiration dur-
his music colleague. But it complete by throwing in snatch- ing the composing sessions for
hasn't been an easy assignment. es of traditional American folk As You Like It. The band's in-
Shakespeare is well-known for melodies, "along the line of fluence is present not only in
his canny use of music in his Aaron Copland," as Roth de- the melodies and arrangements
plays, using it not only for en- scribes it. of the musical score, but also
tertainment, but for technical Roth's musical background in the person of Michael Fisch-
and dramatic purposes as well. goes back several years. He has man, banjo/guitarist for the
This comedy is no exception. worked his way through progres- original band. Fischman is com-
Through the songs, the setting sive productions within the thea- ing in from New York to playE
and mood are established, char- tre department. His first cone banjo specifically for this pro- 4
acters are developed, and events positions were for Student Lab duction.-
are foreshadowed. It has been Theatre, leading to several . With the instrumentation alsoj
lip to Roth to keep these things nieces for University Showcase including harmonica, piano,
in mind while Putting music to plays. For Love A La Mode, bass, and assorted percussion, 4
Shakespeare's lyrics. loth wrote music of different Michael Roth's new-fangled folk!
Yet the main problem in corn- historical periods, including music is a colorful backdrop for
posing this music, Roth notes, Str~auss- and Chopin-influenced the frolicking action.!
was to fit the rhythm and sound melodies and a madrigal. "It's
of the Elizabethan language to really some of the best work

*.PREPAAEFOR: ******** @********
-r ECEM G*-F LE X
I NAT'L MED. & DENT. B'DS
: FLEXIBLE PROGRAM and HOURS
- 1945 PAULINE
A ARBOR, MI. 48103
.,£ 662-3149
TEST PREPARATION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1935
*****gg RQAW tN 'AJOP u..(CITIES 9099 O-*- *
Subscribe to The Daily-Phone 764-0558
VEL MICH. UNION 763-214
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
SKI PARK CITY, UTAH
Dec. 30-Jan. 6th
WE FEATURE:
* Non-stop American Airlines
jet deporting Metro Airport.
* Ski lift tickets for 6 days at
Park City Ski Resort.
! Accommodations at Alpine Prospector's
Lodge in Park City.
* $285/Quad, or
! $299/Double
SIGN UP DEADLINE DEC. 5th
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 763-2147
or
COME TO 2nd FLOOR-MICH. UNION

PRI PI

..

i
I
E({(4
t
1
i
r

"NMI

11'1114:1!

i,

FIFTH SMASH WEEK
DINO Of.LAURENITVS PRESENTS
ROBERT REDFORD
FAYE DUNAWAY
CLIFF ROBERTSON
MAX VON SYDOW

DAYS
OF THE
CONDOR
R tESTRlICTEDs'
SHOWS TONIGHT
AT 7:00 & 9:05
OPEN 6:45

~?tuswe_

P yy s:::;, .,... r.
.": ^: r f,....}".'..!1. :; ".$r.:..^.^...'ri'l.'+: 'J rF:; i:'r,:;}f:': ?n:iyY."}: i:S:":
." n "k. r .5... r .". rr..... e.e.. .... :S i''fi.. ""':SSS ' 'i"}ii}::"::"+ :q4} .;
.e.. S4{..... r......... ......L.....1:.".S ".Y.' :.d "I t"°.'?j 'f.RtiA.4':dt.1;y. N: At!){..yyr.} .L . ."p:".. ^>fr... rY.v. : ": ":??}r:::,t7:% :":.;?..
..-_.... . . . _._.. .... .. _.me.. .... .... _ ....... ........_...__._. _ ._.. _.....___.. e_®._.. __._ _ _______.__..._.

LAST CHANCE TONIGHT
TO SEE
MAHOGANY (PG)

Civil Defense
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 1946
crackers to g o NOTORIOUS
CLEVELAND (JP) - Twenty (AT 7)
tons of crackers stored more CARY GRANT convinces the daughter of a dead Nazi
than a decade to feed survivors agent to accept a dangerous spy mission during World !
if World War III occurred are; War If. Claude Rains is the villian who loves the imposter
destined for the hungry abroad. Ingrid Bergman in this suspenseful film.
Packed in seven-pound tin -
cans, the biscuits have been FRANK CAPRA'S 1938
staeke4 deep in the interior of.an
a steel factory since the early! Tou Ca ' Take It TT itFh You
1960s when Civil Defense was
on everyone's mind.(A9:)
JAMES STEWART, JEAN ARTHUR, LIONEL BARRY-
RECENTLY the steel com MORE, and EDWARD ARNOLD star in this wacky story
pny asked to have the storage f a carefree American family that won Academy Awards
~anyaskd tohav thestoage for best picture, and director,
area cleaned out, so the city be-)
gan looking for a charity in Cinema Guild Both shows OLD ARCH.
need of food, said Ina Keegin, for $2.00 AUD.
a city official.
"The local charities didn't - -
seem attracted by the thought
of 10-year-old crackers, "l\Mrs.0P NS TOM O
Keegin said. . OPENS TOMORROW
The relocation task fell to
James Zingales, the city's pub- THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lic property officer. The only PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
response the city received to
its offers came from CARE, the GUEST ARTST SERIES
international aid agency.
TSn C rt

""* 177:00 & 9:00
STARTS TOMORROW

Open 6:45

WATDIS itYS
n']jstnd I TE(
ROBERTLOUISSTEVENSON'S AND J
GREATEST ADVENTURE!
TECHNICOLOR4 ' ;G
ReveleasedbyBUENAVSTADSTRIBUTONCO.,N

ARTISTS & CRAFTSMEN GUILD presents
CHRISTMAS ART FAIR
80 Artists selling entirely handcrafted work
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6-10:00 a.m.-6 p.m.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-Noon-6:00 p.m.
2ND FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION-PENDLETON ROOM AND UNIVERSITY BALLROOM
UAC MUSKET presents
GODSPELL
DEC. 4, 5, 6; also DEC. 6 MATINEE
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT UAC TICKET CENTRAL
UAC CHILDREN'S THEATRE presents
FREE TO BE YOU AND ME
(based on the TV presentation with MarIo Thomas)

WAt T DISNEY'S
alias The Scarecrow
.ICIHLOR

ENDS TONIGHT

DEC. 4-7:30
DEC. 5-7:30
$1.00--CHILDREN
$1.50-ADULT

DEC. 6-11:00 a.m./2:00 p.m./7:30 p.m.
DEC. 7-11:00 a.m./2:00 p.m./7:30 p.m.
ARENA THEATRE
FRIEZE BUILDING

S 0"The Iceman Cometh"
7:00 ONLY
TOMORROW-The Film
Event of the Season
Sherlock Holmes-his limits:
Knows nothing of common garden-
ing; well up in belladonna, opium,
and poisons generally. Plays the
violin well.-

"ONLY CARE had facilities to
check the condition of the:
crackers," Zingales noted. A
sample was dispatched and a
laboratory returned a report
with high marks for the ship-
ment's quality.
CARE then launched a search
cy. The Lions Club responded
and put up about $1,000 to have
the crackers trucked to Phila-
delphia.
They could end up in either of
two parts of the world, Samia1
said.
They may be sent to Haiti and
the Dominican Republic, where;
lack of rain has left about 600,.
000 persons suffering from hun-
ger.
'T'he other possibility is the
north African republics of Chad I
and Niger, where CARE has'
been fighting a five-year
drought.

NOVEMBER 26-
WED -SAT 8PM
SuNDAY 3PMf
Directed by
Nicholas Pennell
Guest Artist-in-Residence
with WILLIAM LEACf f (G;ucst Artist--In-R-esidence
Tickets available through PTP Ticket Office--
Located in Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby Mon-
day-Friday 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2-5 p.m.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (313) 764-0450

Tickets on sale NOW--at UAC Ticket Central
Group Rates Available ! For more information call-763-1107
UAC SHAKESPEARE CINEMA presents
George Tessler's MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR
NOV. 24 Time-7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m.
Price-$1.00 Place-Nat. Science Auditorium
FUTURE WORLDS is Coming!!!!
THOT PRODUCTIONS
ON SALE NOW .. Theseweeks arts magazine . . . 75c at the Union, UAC Ticket Central,
UAC Office, Fishbowl, all over town"!!
ARTISTS: We have an outlet for all literary genres and visual medias. Share in an artistic
experience. Contact UAC/THOT at 763-1107 or come to the THOT PRODUCTIONS
WEEKLY MEETING, 7:30 Wednesday evening, at the UAC office, 2nd floor Michigan Union.
WANTED: A producer and an Engineer to produce a weekly literary show on WCBN during
the Winter Term 1976. Responsibilities this term involve production of an hour long show.
Please submit an audition taope.
Want to have a class with David Brower, Julian Bond, John Koaol, Jerry O'Neill?
FUTURE WORLDS is RETURNING!!!!
WINTER TERM GEOGRAPHY 303, 4 credits
UAC TICKET BOOTH
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE UAC TICKET BOOTH, First floor Michigan Union. Sorry,
personal checks are not accepted.
GODSPELL Dec. 4, 5, 6
FREE TO BE YOU AND ME Dec. 4, 5,6, 7
OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 10:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M. TELEPHONE 763-2071

K-

PRESENTS
MARX BROTHERS DOUBLE FEATURE !
TUESDAY, NOV. 25
MONKEY BUSINESS
(NORMAN Z. McLEOD, 1931)
AUD. A-7 & 9:30
Marx Brothers. More nonsense from the world's most famous comedy team. The plot
is ourelv incidental as usual. But see Groucho and Lucille in the closet! Thrill to the

E

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan