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November 20, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-20

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Thursday, November 20, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, November 20, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Thre4

_

U' black enrollment declines; County decides to subsidize a less
other minority enrollment p expensive ambulance company
By KEN PARSIGIAN the citizen's time at last night's I ity of service wasn't quest

-I

ATTENTION ALL SKIERS!

No Affinity Groups or Clubs to Joint
snoUmIaEssaLaspenC FLG
VIA UNITED AIRLINES CHARTER FLIGHT

ioned

(Continued from Page 1)
a certain. race and that runs
through the entire campus."
"There has to be a program
wherein they (blacks) can con-
tinue to participate and present
their cultural background to the
University," Garland said.
However Opportunity Program
Director George Goodman points
to other causes for the reduction
in black enrollment and the
weak responses to recruitment
efforts. He cited factors such as
a decline in financial aid, the
deteriorating national economy,
a growing question about the
relevance of higher education
and a bleak job situation.
WILSON, MEANWHILE, attri-
buted the University's success
in boosting overall minority en-
rollment to broad efforts under-
taken since the 1970 BAM strike
such as: increasing the number
of minorities on the recruitment

staff from pne to five; establish-
ing adjunct offices; carrying out
massive 1 e t t e r writing cam-
paigns to minorities in Detroit
and Grand Rapids; and inviting
many high school seniors to visit
the campus and ,talk with coun-
selors.
However, many minority offi-
cials and students are skeptical
of the University's efforts.
Allen, a member of GEO's
Fair Practice Committee said,
"I don't believe there is any co-
ordinated effort at all to recruit
minority students. They shroud
t (recruitment) in the jargon
of the administration. All I hear
is talk."
ALLEN SAID he wants to see
more direct involvement of mi-
nority students in recruitment.
Chicano advocate Leno Men-
diolan says the Chicano enroll-
ment has increased, not through
attempts by the University, but

Franco dies following
long struggle for life

(Continued from Page 1)
Spaniards dead and became a
testing ground for World War II
in Europe. Death for the 5-foot
4-inch Franco, a cold and cal-
culating man who led a spartan
life, came at another critical
juncture for Spain.
NEIGHBORING Portugal was
in throes of its first experiments
with democracy after nearly half
a century of dictatorship, and
Spain too was heading into un-
charted political waters. The
government was taking steps to
pull out of Spanish Sahara,
Western Europe was stll bitter
over the execution of five young
terrorists by Franco's right-
wing regime, and leftist guer-
rillas and Basque separatists
were poised for more violence.
Prince Juan Carlos de Borbon,
37, Franco's handpicked heir
who was made temporary chief
of state Oct. 30 as the stricken
Franco showed no signs of re-
covery and who will become
Span's first king in 44 years,
has indicated he will be open to
orderly political change. He will
take the name King Juan Car-
los I.
Franco's condition had stead-
ily worsened yesterday and doc-
tors said they were only giving
"necessary and essential treat-
ment that does not produce phy-
sical suffering."

VISITORS to the La Paz Hos-
pital where the general has lain
for the past two weeks, left last
night looking deeply upset. Some
Cabinet ministers were crying.
A crowd, which numbered
about 1,000 at one point, gath-
ered outside the La Paz Hos-
pital during the evening to wait
news of the general's condition.
But the streets were almost
empty when Franco's death was
announced, and most Spaniards
would not hear the news until
they woke later in the morning.
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only through recruitment efforts
of his own office and by Chicano
students already enrolled who
persuade others to apply.
Mendiolan says he wants to
see the University expand its
program of remedial courses, to
aid those students who've been
deprived the necessary back-
ground because of discrimina-
tion.
"THE UNIVERSITY is piggy-
backing a discriminating so-
ciety," he added.
T h e University's admission
criteria have also been a target
of criticism.
While administrators such as
Wilson and Goodman adhere to
the notion that the University
must remain "selective," many
minority representatives de-
mand new criteria, which will
examine an applicant's back-
ground and take past discrimina-
tion into account.
THE UNIVERSITY, according
to Wilson, uses a "probability of
success standard" for minori-
ties and Allen says he feels the
University must reexamine its
admission and success stand-
ards, and correlate them with
the actual success rate of all
students.
Despite such criticism, Good-
man claims the University has
"taken gigantic steps" in its re-
cruitment efforts.
He said there are individual
colleges and departments doing
"a fantastic job to integrate the
curriculum to the new kind of
student here."
OTHER DEPARTMENTS have
done "very little," Goodman
said, "but we are trying to
work with them."
"We're never going to solve
the criticsm. Until we reach
the ten per cent, people have a
right to criticize. I'm critical
and I'm on the staff of the Uni-
versity, but I'm out working in
the field trying to get a change."
Allen called for public scru-
tiny of the recruitment pro-
grams.
"THE UNIVERSITY has an
obligation to serve the people
of the state of Michigan and it
should be doing just that," he
said.
He added that the University
must strive to create a faculty,
staff and student body repre-
sentative ofsthe racial and sex-
ual composition of society.

t
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.i
.I
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,
l

Despite citizen testimony
praising the quality and effic-
iency of the Ann Arbor-based
Fontana - Taylor Ambulance
Company, the county's present
subsidized service, the Washte-
naw County Board of Commis-
sioners voted 13 to 1 last night
to subsidize the Jackson-based
Horne - Vinson Ambulance
Company for the next two
years.
The decision was a purely;
monetary one as Horne-Vincent
promised to provide 24-hour
county-wide ambulance service
for a $270,000 subsidy over the
next two years. Although this
is up from the $220,000 paid
Fontana-Taylor for the past two
years, it is less than one-third
the $850,000 that Fontana-Tay-
lor said it would need to provide
the county with top-flight serv-
ice.
"WE CAN'T go any lower'
than thgt and still maintain
the quality of service we have
provided," said John Fontana,
co-founder of Fontana - Taylor.
Janet Buta, who spoke during

meeting, said that she has rid-
den with Fontana - Taylor on
four occasions and found their
service to be 'fantastic.'
"Please don't be pennywise and
pound foolish," she urged the
Board. "This is a matter of!
life and death."
Chelsea resident, Paul Fite,
also spoke out in favor of Fon-
tana - Taylor. "I guess I've
used their (Fontana - Taylor's)
service as much as anyone in
this county, and I've found it to
be excellent. Four times their
para-medics have saved my
life." He added, "Don't trade
life for dollars."
Although both companies have
seven well-equipped ambu-
lances, the similarity stops
there. According to state re-
cords, Fontana-Taylor has 34
certified paramedics, who have
completed nearly 300 hours of
advanced training, and 25 li-
censed ambulance attendants.
The records credit Horne-Vin-
son with only 15 licensed attend-
ants and no paramedics.
FONTANA - TAYLOR'S qual-

but Horne-Vinson had its sup-
porters too. One physician said-
Horne-Vinson has "not only
done an excellent job, but have.
always expressed an interest to
improve both their facilities and
their personnel."
After the meeting, FontanaI
did not seem worried. "They,
can't possibly do the job for
that amount," he said. "They
will go belly-up in June or July,
and then maybe the commis-
sioners will realize what a mis-
take they have made tonight."
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
ARBORLAND--971 -9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761 -2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

DEC.
16-23

SKI TOUR INCLUDES Round-trip, Detroit-Grand Junction
iet transportation: Gd. Jct.-Snowmass charter bus transfers;
deluxe lodoinq seven nights - STONEBRIDGE INN or
WILDWOODfINN; three "Get-Acquainted" parties; tips
and taxes; fully escorted; lift tickets are optional; meals
not included.
MUST BE BOOKED 16 DAYS BEFORE DEPARTURE
- mmm m a awe aamm mm mamamea maa m mmowarn mm,
Mail to: MD
M. GUERIN TOURS, INC. WRITE OR CALL:
4145 Gratiot Ave. WR1TE 3R5CALL:
Port Huron, Michigan 48060 (313) 385-3521
Gentlemen: Please send me your new O.T.C. Colorado
brochure.

Name
Address
City, State and Zip Code.

Subscribe to The Daily

$239
Per Person

i

C LON LARA offers
CHILD CARE
for all Football Saturdays
3-YEAR-OLDS through 11-YEAR-OLDS
Children in age groups with activities
geared to their interest level.
$3.75 PER CHILD-
reduced fees for each additional child in family
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 769-4511
and make your reservation before 3 p.m. on day pre-
cedinq the same.

DEC. 30-
JAN. 6

Per Person

764-0558

I

I

ELECTIONS

For Eight (8) Full Year Positions on the
Executive Council of the
LSA Student Government
will be held on Dec. 8 and 9, 1975.
In order to run for a seat you must sign
up at the LSA Goverment office at:
Room 4001 Michigan Union
DEADLINE for Applying Is:
Tues., Nov. 25,1975 at 5:00 p.m.

ECONO-CAR
438 W. HURON
ANN ARBOR
ALL TYPES of
AUTOS TO RENT,
Including a
LUXURY LIMOUSINE
663-2033
You Must Be 21

East Windc
D. Asian American Students
tOe Mein:regular business 46
enl Metin g current events.
6:3 ~minority affairsfl
6:0p ol. pen forum :
Pot-Luck:Bring refreshments
and food
8:00most importantly,,~
8:0 p.m. bring yourself
Friday, Nov. 21, 1975, -
"'tthe International enter ~

a a~au cAiam, C~x. *
f J uxeje 'M PoRITP
/77 -
For a free booklet on mixology write:GIROUX, P.O. Box 2186G, Astoria Station,New York, N.Y.11102.
Giroux is a product of A-W BRANDS, INC. a subsidiary of IROQUOIS BRANDS LTD.

1 - c

l

~

U

i

1,

! 1

11

"I

.B BRINGIN THIS ADVERTISMENT EE
N ONE WEEK U
O NLY I
rlease
K test
To help you have a safe ski
® season we will release test fl
your equipment, absolutely
free! Just bring in your skis
and boots and we'll test them
while you wait ...on a first -
come, first serve basis.
This free test is available for
one week only, beginning
November 20.
Adjustment and l~brication is not
included and adjustments cannot
be made while you wait.
U U
HOURS:
MON. THRU SAT. I
* 10 am to 6
SUN. Noon to 6
U
CP IU

What Roots has
you cnt patent.
You can patent a sole, as Earth Shoe has.
You can copy it and sell it for less as others have.

AND NOW,. .
The First Ever and Greatest of All
First Prize:
FREE dinner for 2 at
one of Ann Arbor's
Finest Restaurants
PLUS $25 cash
PLUS your design in
The Daily using
special IRON-ON ink.
2nd & 3rd Prizes: Contest
w i l l be acknowledged a n d
have their designs printed in
The Daily using regular ink.

But you can't patent comfort, and quality and beautiful which
is what you get in a pair of Roots'
Beautiful top-grain Canadian leather.
Beautiful stitching and workmanship and detail.
A sole that cradles your heel and supports your arch.
And above all, caring.
The people who make and sell Roots really do give a damn
about comfortable and handsome and you. And it shows.
Compare us with Earth Shoes or Nature Shoes or Exersoles or
anybody and you'll get the picture.
You'll pay a bit more for Roots.
Because Roots are more. R oots.
Buy a pair and you'll love them "Be kind to feet.They outnumber people two to one.
for a long time.
_:. ; , moiiV-,.

1

-

Design an emblem, cartoon or drawing incorporating into its theme the
Michigan Football Wolverines and their upcoming Bowl appearance.
The winning design will be reprduced in The Daily using special ink
so that students and all team supporters can IRON-ON your artistic
talents to the front of their t-shirts.
--RULES---
ELIGIBILITY: Anyone who supports U of M football
ARTWORK: no larger than 6 1/2" deep x 9" wide or 9" x 6/",
black ink on white paper. Include name, address and
phone no. and bring or mail to The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104. Submit as many
entries as you like.

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