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November 18, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
rts & En tertc inmfn Tuesday, November 18, 1975 Page Five.

Have a flair for
artistic writinq?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewlog
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
# drama, dance. ftim
arts: Contact Arta
E d it ox. oo The
Michigan lDaily,

(Brana' proves ambitious
By NANCY COONS their motions into one clear nated the program, giving it
stance without the seeming in- full visual impact, requiring cos-
The University S c h o oI of direction that made the other tumes, set, ahd lighting to sup-'
Music filled every inch of Power "sins" less complete. All were port t h e i r elaborate choreog-
Center with sound, color, mo- entertaining, h o w e v e r, and raphy. If the nuances of music
tion, and crowds this weekend, laughable though not in the and text were somewhat lost in
Two evening performances and least horrible, as the program the flurry of feet, overall it was
a Sunday matinee were sold out notes suggested. still stunning and beautiful.
well in advance as Ann Arbor Carmina B u r a n a followed.
anticipated one of the most am- C It is a powerful choral work There were some superb solo
bitious productions of Carl Orff's with all the emotional impact performances on the stage. Syl-
Carmina B u r a n a with two of a Wagnerian production, and vie Lambert danced the roast-
choirs, orchestra, three vocal ofwas composed in Nazi Germany. ing swan, contorting herself andr
soloists, and a stageful of Two themes in the poety, Fate fluttering one hand pathetically
dancers. Gratefully, the group Two thst ie poeby Fate efore being carried off to
was quite successful in this over- Iyand lust, are powerfully co - 'gnashing teeth.' Gay Delanghe
whemin unertkin, wh ic hveyed with stark, percussive ef- gnedasgteth"wayeanhe
whelming undertakas somewhat reminiscent of fects in the music, while the soloed as the woman whose
lover rode away on horseback;
was omehat emmscen ofgentler themes of young love lvrrd wyo osbc;
Band Day in its crowded and gnlspringtime are presented !her motions were smooth and
spectacular effects. With only a and sprigte a sted taught, and more attuned to the
few exceptions, it was a fault- th meiyfSymes n sr music than those of any other
less performance. The Univesit y o Or dancer. She was joined in the
Faculty-member William Al- contrasts and under Thomas |next segment by a pair of lov-
bright's Seven Deadly Sins could Hillbish'sb a ton the group j ers, danced by Elesa Chernin
have been overshadowed by the achieved several stunning ef and Gary Schaaf. All three were
tremendous production w h i c h ac: t n sensitive and disciplined; the
followed. The work did provide fects. . result was beautiful.
an introduction for what was to In the opening of the "Spring-' Perhaps the most stunning
come, but held its own as an time" section, the piccolo and effects of the production were
amusing and complete spec- percussion w e r e outstandingly the opening and closing scenes,
tacle. alert; the horns were full andwhere all facets of the nerfor-
Each of the sins was personi- vibrant in its closing. The only manle were combined. Fortune
fied in a solo dancer, whose less' weakness in the orchestra was stood high in her fantastic robes,
than subtle costumes included its general lack of precision is in which headdress and sleeves
green for Envy, red for Wrath, the tricky attacks and transi- combined to make a wheel-like
and a pink glitter heart below tions, and there were plenty in orb.She overlooked a mob of
the navel for Lechery. Sylvie a composition containing over hooded dancers, who writhed be-
Lambert communicated her dy- twenty-five sections. neath a suspended black cloth.
namic and energetic Wrath as The University Chamber Choir The full chorus sang "Mon-
successfully as Eileen Green- was beyond repproach. Their strous and empty fate, thou,
bain did her drained and loose- diction was crisp, their voices turning wheel, art mean . ."
limbed Sloth. Both coordinated full and well-blended. Even the thileng t naiponed
usullypaifulhig noes n Ethreateningly. I was extremely
"Where is my Lover?" were dramatic, and brought the audi-
":.:.. true ndandrbroughtve.the
greand veyect ie. The ence toctheir feet when repeated
glee-club effect of "When a boy 'at the close.
and a maiden are alone to The entire evening's program
I gether," using a few male was an ambitious undertaking,
IO i11l iIL voices atcapella, was delightful. and each department prodnoed
r1 Joining the Chamber Choir, the excting results. An unbelievably
Clague Middle School Concert long waiting list for tickets was
jaws Choir added their pure sound to well-justified, and t h o s e who
some of the most moving sec- m t ,n k ih

'Toledo'

again a success

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By TOM GODELL opera after Shakespeare's Much
Ado About Nothing. Although,
Berioz: Overture to eatrice and sadly, this work is seldom heard
Hummel: Trumpet Concerto it ranks with the best music
Shostakovich: symphony no. 15, Berlioz composed. This careful-
Op. 141 ly crafted miniature was played
Telemann: sonate de Concert for magnificiently. Balance between
martini: Trumpet Concerto in D the orchestral choirs, unfortun-
The Toledo Orchestra, an en- ately lacking in previous con-
semble that has established a certs, was perfect, and the tone
considerable reputation over the was wonderfully even. Overall
past few years, may have failed Maestro Fornet's reading was
to live up to its potential in the impassioned and exciting.
first two concerts of this season,
j but the third time proved to be The next portion of the con-
a charm. cert featured Trumpet virtuoso
Last Friday's concert began Maurice Andre, playing Hum-
with Berlioz's Overture to Bea- mel's Concerto. Looking more
trice and Benedict, from an 'like a tenor than a trumpeter

he entered briskly and took his no particular order. The humor
place within the orchestra. An- is strained, and the climaxes are U.S. BEST
dre, no flashy virtuoso, empha- forced. Yet, Shostakovich could IN R&D
sizes his role as a member of not find a more sympathetic in- MINNEAPOLIS t - In an-
the orchestra by standing be- terpreter than Serge Fornet. He nINg the establishment fn
tween the conductor and the held my interest with this twounci new computer-based syof
second violins. From the mo- music, poor though it is. Fur- tems designed to speed the
ment the music begins, one her, the orchestral playing was world-wide transfer and 'ex-
senses his complete involve- brilliant, particularly the solos. dchange of technology, William
ment in it. Andre enjoys whatIC.aNor tch nof CWol
he is doing, and he easily con- After intermission the audi- C. Norris, chairman of Control
veys this 'to his audience. He ence was given a special treat. Data Corp., has reported . . .
achieves a tremendous rapport The orchestra was reduced to "the United -States will spend
with the orchestra which allows chamber size (18 strings), and ,35 billion of the world total of
him to dialogue with them beau- Maurice Andre returned to play $70 billion on research and de-
tifully. a pair of lovely baroque con- velopment in 1975.

Unfortunately this excitement
was rapidly dissipated as the
orchestra began the final work

certi by Telemann and Tartini.
Once again Andre and Fornet
combined to g e n e r a t e great
verve and excitement, and their
reward was a well deserved
standing ovation.

He said, however, that "this
cumulative stock of knowledge
is likely to be unevenly put to
use, particularly in the develop-
ing societies of Latin America,
Asia and Africa."

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Classifieds
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on the first half of the program
-Shostakovich's 15th, his last,
but least symphony. This music
could cure chronic insomina, if
one could keep from laughing
long enough. It is little more
than a potpourri of themes from
Rossini, Rimsky-Korsakov, Wag-
ner, and o t h e r Shostakovich

Join The Daily Staff
U-M SCHOOL OF MUSIC presents
PUCCIN I
La Boheme
November 20, 21, 22, 23-8 p.m.-$4.50
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre4
JOSEF BLATT, conductor
RALPH HERBERT, stage director
Box Office: Nov. 18-19-12:30-6 p.m.
763-1085 Nov. 20-23-12:30-8 p.m.
SPECIAL ADMISSION to working rehearsals of
La Boheme is being allowed to UM students
with valid ID's. $1.00 tickets avail. (balcony).
Tues., Nov. 18 & Wed., Nov. 19-7:00 p.m.
TICKETS AVAILABLE at the box office Tues. & Wed.

symphonies, thrown together in
WEST SiDE
BOOK SHOP
FINE USED and RARE BOOKS
at REASONABLE PRICES
LIBRARIES PURCHASED
113 W. Liberty
Mon.-Sat.: 11:00-6:00
Thurs. and Fri. Nites to 9:00
995-1891

CAROL REED'S 1949
THE THIRD MAN
Orson Welles (as Harry Lime) and Joseph Cot-
ton star in this original "Chase Through the
Sewers" thriller. Welles in one of his best per-
formances as a fascinating man of evil who sets
his traps in the ruins of post-war Vienna. With
a screenplay by Graham Green and a haunting
musical score, t h i s is one of Reed's finest
movies;
WED.: Bogart in A LONELY PLACE
TONIGHT AT *LD"',,si
jCinema Guild 7:00 is 9:05 Admission $1.25

!" T - ^

tate-I~- were smart-ter ucx -enougn
!tosof the work, includinhe I11L'1I~I
A formula is' beginning to tions of "Cort ofcLove. the to get their seats in advance
surface: take one best-selling openig of Court of Loveo were rewarded with a memor-
novel, preferably appealing to soloisthethree faculty o a ble evening of music and
the morbid curiosities of the s otsbaritone Leslie Guinn dance.
masses; adapt it to the screenwa outstanding. Each of them
by turning the taskoverstoa faced parts that challenged their
promising young director; so- ranges, but he was the one who CH AR iNG CROSS
licit the talents of the best spe- performed withoutveflinchinge,a BOOKSHOP
cial effects men in the business solo which called for Guinn to Used, Fine and Scholarly Boks
(invade Disney if necessary); leap from an intensely quiet 316 S. STATE--994-4041
wait two years through a seem- near-falsetto to a virile, rich Open Mon.-Fri. 10-8,
ingly doomed production sched- bass, didn't phase him. He seem- Sat. 10-6
ule, and - presto! Anyone re- ed to thrive on the showiness of--
sembling a human being will; the music, and played his role
be subjected to the final pro- to the hilt.
duct in one form or another. 'The r e al selling -point that;
The process worked in 1973 separated this production from
with The Exorcist, and it looks any typical concert performance
as if it may work even better of Carmina Burana, was, of
this year with Jaws. But this course, the dancers. They domi-'
time, the scenario is slightly 4

Uc C
Rthisv sek

/

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I.

UAC CONCERT COOP presents
FRANK ZAPPA
TONIGHT AT CRISLER ARENA
TICKETS: $6.00 AND $5.00-AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
NATIONAL LAMPOON SHOW
THIS THURSDAY, NOV. 20
TICKETS: $350-Available at Ticket Central, First Floor Michigan Union

FILMS BY ALAIN RESNAIS
D. &THURS. IN AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

different.
Unlike the Friedkin follies of
two years ago, Jaws, only the
second major film by cinemat-
ic whiz-kid Steven Spielberg,, is
a tense and terrifying work,
constructed in almost classic!
utilization of the director's
sense of mounting fear.
The film's screenplay, a co-,
effort by, Carl Gottlieb and'
Peter Benchley (who author
the book) serves as the frame-!
work by which Spielberg crafts
his effort. -James Valk

TUES., WE

PINBALL
is Coming
TO THE
UNION LANES
Watch For It!

TONIGHT, TUESDAY, NOV. 18
HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR

(Alain Resnais, 1959)

AUD. A-7 only

UAC MUSKET presents
GODSPELL
DEC. 4, 5, 6, ALSO SAT. MATINEE DEC. 6
TICKETS NOW ON SALE at UAC Ticket Central

;
w

An actress falls in love with a Japanese architect while she is in that country for a film.
Resnais introduces us to Chinese-box effects: a film within a film, an actress playing
an actress, an anti-war film within an anti-war film, and flashbacks between France
and Japan carefully interwoven. Written by Marquerite Duras. French with English
subtitles.
STAVISKY (Alain Resnais, 1974) AUD. A-9 only
Alain Resnais' first picture in 5 years and fifth film overall is based in the late twenties
and is stunninaly done. Stavisky was a prime manipulator in international politics and
economics and had much to do with the 1929 scandal-crash. Color. French with English
subtitles.
ONE SHOW-$1.25 DOUBLE FEATURE-$2.00
WEDS.: LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD, STAVISKY

UAC MEDIATRICS
SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE
NOV. 21 AND 22-NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM

I

i

TIME: 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

PRICE: $1.00

.s.
®

..

TONGHTat 7:00&:0
OPEN at 6:45
DINO DE LAURENTIIS PRESENTS
ROBERT REDFORD
FAYE DUNAWAY
CLIFF ROBERTSON
MAX VON SYDOW
IN A STANLEY SCHNEIDER PROP'JCTION
A SYDNEY POLLACK FILM

TOCGCPs
UAC Concert Co-op Presents

3
DAYS
OF THE
CONDOR
JOHN HOUSEMAN
eusicyDAVID GRUSIN/eAsioorn ME ov,.
SixAYS OF TmE coNoo BYJAMES GRADY
SREPA LORENZO SEMPLE, JR
.Ao DAVID RAYFIEL
PRooOcwsY STANLEY SCHNEIDER
oawCIEDY SYDNEY POLLACK PANAVISION0
TECHNICOLOR* A PARAMOUNT RELEASE
R RESRICTE
LT G VAAOAAN .A
PRW*Rf, 'AOV :a I uAN

UAC SHAKESPEARE CINEMA
George Schaefer's MACBETH
NOV. 24-NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
TIME: 7:00 P.M. AND 9:00 P.M.
UAC TRAVEL
Christmas Trips Skiing in Utah-$285
NEW YORK .... $79,73 DEC. 30-JAN. 6
Christmas in Utah-$119
BOSTON .....$87.83 DEC. 20-DEC. 29
DALLAS ...... $123.73 DEC. 27-JAN. 5
UAC CHILDRENS THEATRE
presents FREE TO BE YOU AND ME
an original adaptation of the TV special with MARLO THOMAS
PERFORMANCES: Dec. 4-7:30 p.m.; Dec. 5-7:30 p.m.; Dec. 6-11:00 a.m., 2:00
p.m., 7:30 pmm.; Dec. 7-11 :00 a..m., 2:00 a.m., 7:30 p.m.
THOT PRODUCTIONS
THESEWEEKS arts magazine
ON SALE NOW!!!! 75c
at the Union, UAC-ticket central, UAC office, fishbowl, and "all over town"!
ARTISTS: We have an outlet for all literary genres and visual medias. Share in an artistic
experience. Contact UAC/THOT at 763-1107 or come to the THOT PRODUCTIONS WEEK-
LY MEETING: 7:30 Wednesday evening, at the UAC Office, 2nd Floor Michigan Union.
WANTED: A PRODUCER and a ENGINEER to produce a weekly literary show on WCBN
during the Winter Term 1976. Responsibilities this term involve production of an hour long
audition tape for consideration at WCBN.
CONTACT: Tim or David at UAC/THOT Productions-763-1107
Tickets available at UAC TICKET CENTRAL, First Floor Michigan Union
NATIONAL LAMPOON SHOW Nov. 20 FREE TO BE YOU AND ME Dec. 4, 5, 6
LA BOHEME Nov. 20, 21, 22, 23 GODSPELL Dec. 4, 5, 6
UAC TICKET CENTRAL-phone 763-2071--Monday thru Friday 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
SORRY, WE CANNOT ACCEPT PERSONAL CHECKS

They drank and they dreamed...
tomorrow they would conquer the world...
then along came Hickey.
THE ELY LANDAU ORGANIZATION INc AND
CINEVISON LTEE PRESENT
LEEQIMARVI\
FREDPCMARCH
PCRWFPTRVAN

and THE MOTHERS

11

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