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November 16, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-16

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Page Eight,_

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

November 16, 1975

Paqe Ei~ht, THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Bell's

first

quarter

TD's

provide edge

Illini penalty sets up winning
TD, stage set or Big Ten finale

(Continued from Page 1)
Three plays later, Illinois full-
back Steve Greene fumbled and
Michigan's Don Dufek recover-
ed at the Illinois 30. From there,
the Wolverines needed just six
plays to convert the Illini mis-
cue into the game's initial touch-
down. Tailback Gordon Bell,
who gained 28 of Michigan's 30
yards on the drive, darted over
from two yards out, and the
Wolverines led 6-0. Michigan
placekicker Bob Wood missed
the conversion, his third miss of
the season.
THE STRATEGY of choosing
the wind proved successful again
o n 1 y moments later. Illinois
started at their own 21 yard
line, was unable to generate any
offense, and had to punt from
its own 20. The Illini punter,
Phil Vierneisel, managed only
a 28 yards boot into the wind,
and Michigan took over once
again with excellent field posi-
tion.
This time, the Wolverines re-
quired 12 plays to execute their
second scoring drive. Michigar
stuck exclusively to the ground,
and converted a key fourth anc
five at the Illini 31, with Lytle
booming over right guard for '
six yard pickup. Bell went the
final yard for the touchdown,
and Lytle added a two-point con-
verison to give Michigan a 14-0
edge at the end of the first
quarter.

When defensive end Dan Jilek Paced by the running of Bell,r
intercepted a Kurt Steger pass Lytle, and L e a c h, MichiganI
and returned it to the Illinois moved 46 yards in ten plays to
34 yards line three plays later, assume a commanding 21 pointi
it appeared that a rout was im- lead. The Wolverines attemptedi
minent. However the Illini de- their second pass of the day dur-l
fense stiffened, and held on ing this drive, and it appearedt
downs, and the momentum slid that it would net a touchdown,
from Michigan's grasp. but wingback Smith was trip-
AFTER AN exchange of punts, ped while pursuing the ball, and
Michigan started at its own 38, Michigan had to settle for a first
and moved steadily downfield, down on the Illinois four 'yard
utilizing the running of Bell and line. Leach capped the drive on
a Rick Leach to Jim Smith pass a keeper from one yard out.'
good for 27 yards. The drive AFTER HICKS' second inter-
was thwarted, however, when ception, Lytle fumbled away theI
Bell fumbled deep in Illinois ball for the second time, and]
I territory, and the Illini recover- the dormant Illini finally came
ed on their own 13 yards line. alive. Steger moved his team
The beginning of the third almost exclusively through the
period featured a continuation air to the Michigan 15, and tail-
of the defensive struggle. Mid- back Lonnie Perrin carried four
way through the quarter, safety times from there to the Mich-;
Dwight Hicks made his first of igan 5. Then Steger spotted,
two interceptions, and Michigan Johnson alone in the end zone,
obtained the ball on the Illinois and Illinois narrowed the gap
46 yard line. 21-7.I

The Wolverine offense storm-
ed back, only to be confronted
again by disaster in the form
of yet another fumble. This time
it was Leach's bad pitchout to
Bell at the Illinois 37 that
thwarted the Michigan attack.
Steger went to the air again,
and Illinois moved to the Mich-
igan 17 yard line where it faced
a fourth and three situation.
Steger's overthrow of Chrystal
apparently stopped the drive,
but Hicks was penalized for in-
terference, and the Illini had
new life and a first down on the
Michigan 11.
TWO PLAYS later, tailback
Jim "Chubby" Phillips burst up
the middle to score a touchdown
and make the score Michigan
21, Illinois 13. The Illini added
a two-point conversion, to come
within a successful onside kick
of being back in the game.
The dream ended there, and
Michigan. maintained an unde-
feated season heading nto Sat-
urday's showdown.
Physically, the Wolverines suf-
fered injuries to Lytle (pinched
nerve), corner back Jim Bolden
(hip pointed), Leach (shoulder
strain), defenders -Tim Davis
and Jeff Perlinger (received
minor sprains). All should be
ready next week with the pos-
sible exception of Bolden.

,.i
rI
Il
d

T minus

Michigan
First Downs 16
Rushing att/yds 66/218
Passing 1-1-0-27
Total off. plays 67
Total yards 245
Fumbles/no. lost 6/4
Penalties 3/22
Interceptions 3/31
Punting 4/40.8
Punt returns 2/12
Kick returns 1/0
Score by guar
Michigan 14
Illinois 0

rte
0
0

Illinois
16
47/137
11-24-3-1
71
240
3/1l
5/46
0/0
6/41.3
2/6
2/38
xs
7
0

six days .
M-Bell 2 run (kick failed)
IM-Bell 1 run (Lytle run)
M-Leach 1 run (Wood kick)
03 I-Johnson 5 pass from Stegar
(Beaver kick)
I-Phillips 2 run (Johnson pass
from Steger)
MICHIGAN

i
t
1
,
!
,
I'
i
l;

AP Photo
MICHIGAN MIDDLE linebacker Dave Devich forces Illinois runner Lonnie Perrin out of bounds shy of the goal line in the
fourth quarter of yesterday's game. Chubby Phillips scored for the Illini on the next play. Perrin gained 88 yards rushing
against the Blue defense.

0
151

MORETTO SCORES HAT TRICK:

E
L
IE
I
c
I
I
1

B LOWN
DEAD

Icers

outgun

Ir0ish

Bell
Lytle
Leach
Davis
Smith
Leach
Smith
Perrin
Phillips
Greene
Johnson
Steger
Steger
jPerrin
Chrystal
Johnson
Smalzer
Phillips
Perrin

Rushing
att yds ave
35 141 4.0
17 51 3.0
11 19 1.7
2 7 3.5
1 0 0.0
Passing
att comp int
1 1 0
Receiving
no yds ave
1 27 27.0
ILLINOIS
Rushing
att yds ave
27 88 3.3
10 35 3.5
6 22 3.7
1 -1 -
3 -7 -2.3
Passing
att comp int
23 11 2
1 0 1
Receiving
no yds ave
6 59 9.8
2 28 14.0
1 7 7.0
1 7 7.0
1 2 2.0

]g
13
8
11
4

y2% BILLBOARD
ig Season basketball tickets for
27 students go on sale Wednes-
day, Nov. 19, not Monday as
Ig previously expected, due to a
113! delay in printing. Seniors and
8I these wvith,' six semesters at
-i; Michigan should buy their tic-
1 kets from 8 a.m. to noon
yds Wednesday, juniors from noon
103 to 5 p.m., sophomores from 8
o am. to noon Thursday and

-- By RAY O'HARA
The more things change...
...the more they stay the same

11

TO THE SURPRISE of many, the Big Ten
again come down to one ultimate game.
loser of that contest will be winging its way to
instead of staying home, the agony of defeat
as always.

Season has once
Even though the
the Orange Bowl,
will be the same

Surprise? In a way. Ten weeks ago it was thought by many
that Wisconsin and Michigan State had finally accumulated the
talent and depth needed to make a legitimate run at the title.
Michigan and Ohio State both seemed to be badlly hurt by
graduation. An end of an era was eagerly awaited. But it was
not to be.
The hopes of the Badgers and Spartans both lie in ashes,
amidst scores of painful injury reports, game plans and pre-
season press clippings. No one on either team will win any
Heisman Trophies and be named "All-American."
Meanwhile Michigan and Ohio State have gotten better all
year. Michigan was clearly overrated (as number two in the
nation) at the season's beginning. Two ties showed that, but since
then they have pounded forward over both injury and adversity
to become a genuine contender for the national title.
Buckeyes deserve top spot
Ohio State, riddled by graduation and confronted with its
toughest schedule ever, has nonetheless performed brilliantly
and deserves its number one rating, complaints from Nebraska
rooters not withstanding. Archie Griffin has run like everyone
knew he would and Cornelius Greene showed that he really can
throw to receivers who really can catch. .
Its defense, not always quick, has hit hard and played in-
telligently. As of today, Woody Hayes could ask for little more
than what he has-but there's still Michigan to contend with.
It has been a long time since Woody has won in Ann
Arbor and judging from his age, and the Wolverines' Youth,
It may be his last shot at it. In two years the heart of this
year's Michigan team will still be around so the Fat Man
will never have a better shot than the one he'll have in six
days.
As for Michigan it has progressed with the maturation of
its young defensive secondary, its young offensive line and its
extraordinary young quarterback.
All three have had their problems. As late as yesterday a
team of Illinois' caliber could throw an unfamiliar defense at the
Wolverines and hamper both Leach and the offensive front. Early
in the season, Stanford's passing riddled the secondary, and the
departure of the injured Jim Bolden yesterday opened the door
to another flurry of successful opposition aerials.
The question, of course, iswhether these young players can
beat OSU.
No one worries whether Tim Davis will make tackles or
Gordon Bell will evade them. But will Jim Pickens come up to
slow the OSU option and will Rick Leach hit his receivers? If
they and the other sophomores and freshmen perform up to their
capabilities, victory for Michigan is not only possible but likely.
Michigan improving
Michigan's season has shown how well it'can play. Be-
tween the Baylor and Purdue games Michigan fans have
seen the murky depths to which the Blue can sink as well as
the dizzying heights to which it can rise.
Illinois was another bad road game experience for the Wol-
verines. Yet, despite the score, there was never any real doubt
in the minds of those who. were there that Michigan would win.

By PAUL CAMPBELL But within five minutes, the fensive letups to score. Pirus responded halfway into
Special To The Daily Wolverines had cranked out "That's what happens when the period to knot the score at
SOUTH BEND - Michigan's four goals to ice the contest. you make mistakes against a 3-3. Moretto scored on a power 1
hockey team turned on the Dave DeBol, set up beauti- team 1 i k e Michigan," noted play, less than two minutes
scoring machine last night and fully on a breakaway by pass- Fighting Irish coach Lefty Smith later.
pulled away in the third period es from Tom Lindskog and after the game. "You get your But Kevin Nugent, the hero ofF
to take a 9-6 WCHA decision: Bill Thayer, scored on a back- potato burned." Friday's game, parked one in
from the Fighting Irish of Notre hand drive less than a minute At the outset of the game, it the net from less than a foot
Dame. into the period, seemed as if the Wolverines away after a mixup at the side
Angie Moretto was the biggest;'wolblwNteDm of ofhegaI
gun as he chalked up a hat Just over a minute later, Mau- -
trck wthanasit hrwn~ rer, slammed one home fromI the ice. They were skating Between the second and third
trick, with an assist thrown bly right of Notre Dame goalie Len well, moving the puck out of periods, Notre Dame'sunique
for good measure. was a y Moher. But Clark Hamilton re- their own zone easily, and set- skating cheerleaders took the ice
s pported Kris Maneryoalsnd ofthree taliated almost immediately, ting up scoring opportunities to lead the crowd in a chorus of
points each from Kip Maurer, pulling his team to within one with crisp passing and heads- the school fight song. But a re-
and Tom Lindskog goal 0on a quick tally off a face- up play. cording of the Star Spangled
n Thegme Lask tieda4-Nteoff pass. The newly-formed line consist- Banner was put on accidentally,
T he at ws tnd as e Bing-of Moretto, Mark Miller, and and set the stage for Michigan's
Dame had doggedly refused to even think about tying the scoreBen Kawa provided the scoring third period fireworks.
play dead after falling behind again, Mike C o f i a n and punch. Six minutes into the
early. I Manery took advantage of de- game, Moretto knocked in a Angie haberdasher
Kawa rebound, and Kawa in FIRST PERIOD
. turn used second and third ef- SCORING: I. M-Maretto (Kawa)
forts to register his first goal of 6:00; 2. M - Kawa (Maretto, Fox)
12:45; 3. ND -- Clarke (unassisted)
SCO RES I the season five minutes later. 13:29; 4. ND - Pirus (Walsh,
But Notre Dame, who proved Brownchild) 14:22 PP
COLLEGE FOOTBALL I Georgia Tech 14, Navy 13 on Friday that they never stop SAVES
MICHIGAN 21, Ilnois 15South Carolina 37, Wake Forest 26 fighting t a break when Paul ; ERIO
na 9, Wisconsin 9 Wevirginia 31, Richmond 13 Clarke intercepted1an erra n SCORING: 5DPM MRne (Mr
Purdue5 19.anIowaMa18
Puich ,IgaSt.472Nothesten1 Texas A&M 33, Rice 14 Greg Natale pass and skated in er) 4:09; 6. ND - Pirus (Walsh,
Michigan St. 47, Northwestern 14 Alabama 27, So. Mississippi 6 alone on Robbie Moore to score Clarke) 12:50; 7. M - Moretto (Pal-
CaOhio State 318, Minnesota 6 Columbia 28, Penn 25 unassisted. mer) 15:28 PP; 8. ND - Nugent
California 3, Air Force 14 Misssippi 23, Tennessee 6uasse.(arom 65
Georgia 28, Auburn 13 MIs(Fairholm) 16:59
Texas ech 3, Bayor 10Vanderbilt 23, Army 14Pea
enas Tech 33, Baylor 10o 5Penalty trouble kept Michigan THIRD PERIOD
Maryland 22, Clemson 20 on the defensive. When Kris SCORING: 9. M - DeBol (T.
Arkansas 35,. SMU 7 Manery went off for holding Lindskog, Thayer) 0:53; 10. M -
Florida 48, Kentucky 7 North Carolina 17, Tulane 15 i ery minutes left n t p Maurer (Miller, D. Lindskog) 2:15;
Yale 24, Princeton 13 Centra Michigan 69 No Illinois 7 i m es first 11. ND - Hamilton (Walsh) 3:24;
Mississippi St. 16, LSU 6 Ceta ihgn6,N.Ilios7 idNteDm' explosive frtAioa3,Clrd t 12. 14I- Coffman (DeBol) 3:46; 13.
Oklahoma 2s8. Misuri 27 Arizona 31, Colorado St. d,9or t x idat Ma d~r~eTL ~~
Pittom 34, MtreoDame2 No. Michigan 27, WV. Illinois 23 line was quick to take advant- M - Manery (Maurer, T. Lindskog)
Pitt 34, Notre Dame 20 Texas 27, TCU 11 age of the opportunity. Alex 4:13; 14. M - Moretto (D. Lind-
Duke 21, No. Carolina St. 21 Memphis St. 14, Houston 7 Pirus, Notre Dame's leading skog, T. Lindskog) 11:07 PP; 15. ND
K .UCLA 31, Oregon St.9rBrownschidle (Walsh, Nugent)
Neaska(O52, Iowant. CA31 rgSt.t.scre, 9pedin a shot from 1:1- P
Miraid()4, Kent S.68Stanford 33, Oregon 30 soetpe 51 P
Harvard 45, Brown 26 San Jose St. 31, San Diego St. 7 j fellow captain Brian Walsh to ( TOTAL SAVES
Browns 12 24, Cleveland Miami (Fla.) 24, Florida St. 22 tie the game. M Moore 12,' 6, 13, 31 (total); ND
Washington 8, USC 7 OSU Invitational Ties were the story of the Moher 19, 9, 19, 47 (total)
Dartmouth 33, Cornell 10 Michigan first place s d r s .r
Rutgers 41, Boston U. 3 H.S. Footballc; second period as iell. Manery
Villanova 13, Holy Cross 12 Hudson 24, Kalamazoo Hackett 14 ( scored first for Michigan, but G Ol

Harriers nab second
in district tourney
From Wire Service Reports Host team Indiana placed
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - The third with a score of 81, follow-
Wisconsin Badgers placed three ed by Illinois with 94, and Kent
runners in the top ten to cap- State with 147.
ture the team crown of the NC- The top five teams travel to
AA District 4 cross-country Penn State on November 24 for
tournament yesterday. The Bad- the NCAA championship along
gers nipped favored Michigan, with the five best individuals
scoring 68 points to the Wolver- not associated with one of the
ines' 80. team qualifiers.
Big Ten champion Craig Vir- INDIVIDUALS qualifying for
gin of Illinois won the individ- the NCAA Championship are
ual crown with a time of 29:18.6 Lindsay and Jeff Pullen, both
on the hilly six mile course at of Michigan State, Phil Hinck
Indiana University. of Toledo, John Kealer of But-
MICHIGAN'S best effort came ler, and Ten Rupe of Cleveland
from third place finisher Mike State.
McGuire who posted a time of Other team scores yesterday
30:11. Rounding out the rest of were: Ball State 179, Eastern
the Wolverines field were fifth Michigan 193, Ohio State 233,
place finisher Greg Meyer with Notre Dame 261, Central Mich-
a time of 30:29, Bill Donakow- igan 276, Miami of Ohio 288,
ski at 30:38, Jack Sinclair at Ohio University 296, Bowling
31:35, Marc Foster at 31:56, Jay Green 307, Illinois State 318,
Anstaett at 32:35 and Steve El- Western Michigan 357, North-
liot at 33:51. ' western 375 and Marshall 455.

ig
12
23
7,
7'
2

".. . V l X A~ o~~ aa
freshmen from noon to 5 p.m.
Season tickets for students
cost $14 for 15 games. Individ-
ual games cost $1.50 for stu-
dents.

VDS GOPHERS, 38 - 6

osU

rolls onward

By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS-Top-ranked Ohio State, fired by
the record running of Archie Griffin and Pete
Johnson, clinched a trip to either the Rose or
Orange Bowl with a 38-6 victory yesterday over
Minnesota.
Griffin, who scored on a 19-yard run and
wound up with 124 yards in 23 rushes, left the
game with more than 10 minutes to play.
Johnson thundered eight yards for a Big Ten
record 22nd touchdown this season.
Quarterback Cornelius Greene darted for
touchdowns of 14 and 31 yards, ran for 67
yards and passed for 131 yards as the Buckeyes
pushed their over-all record to 10-0-0 and
league mark to 7-0-0.
Ohio State throttled Minnesota passing whiz
Tony Dungy, picking off three of his aerials.
Dungy did not complete his first pass until
11 minutes remained in the third quarter. The
Gophers trailed 17-0 at that point en route to
their fifth loss in 10 decisions and fifth in
seven conference games.
* * *
Purdue outpoints
LAFAYETTE-Quarterbacks Mark Vital! and
Craig Nagel led a fourth quarter drive cul-
t/ minatin with.. Q,.,4' T~~lrn cti.R ns rinrA rin

and Nagel, substituting for Vitali, hit Reggie
Arnold on a 23-yard pass and Paul Beery on a
14-yarder to set up the game-winning touch-
down.
* ,' *
Spartan spree
EAST LANSING, - Quarterback Charlie Bag-
gett fired a pair of touchdown bombs and spark-
ed two more scoring drives with his running
yesterday as Michigan State exploded for six
second-half TD's and a 47-14 Big Ten football
victory over Northwestern.
The victory, before a final home game crowd
of 54,432, lifted MSU to 6-4 on the season and
3-4 in the conference. Northwestern is 3-7 and
2-6, respectively.
Northwestern looked poised for an upset in
the first half, taking the opening kickoff and
marching 80 yards to a toucshdown, capped
by a one-yard plunge by fullback Rich
Boothe. Boykin sparked the Wildcat attack,
rambling for 53 yards in the drive.
Boykin ran for 101 yards in the first half to
reach 1,022 yards for the year.
Hoosiers tie
M',AT)TRON ---. Wiscnsin's de~fense.led by end

F :...: :if' f.

I

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